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Beginning Woodworker Needs Help with Lumber Species Identification

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Forum topic by texasjoker posted 05-23-2016 01:27 PM 845 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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texasjoker

2 posts in 242 days


05-23-2016 01:27 PM

Topic tags/keywords: memorial day 2016 - home of the brave wood identification question

First & foremost, Happy Veteran’s Day Lumberjocks. We are so fortunate that our armed services protect us willingly, even at the cost of their own lives. A moment of silence for our fallen heroes…

I came across a few 4” x 1” planks of this wood while walking my dog yesterday, which my neighbors left for the trash when they moved. I quickly checked for 6 or 8 legged residents, and brought it home, being very careful not to alert the wife to what I was doing. No matter how much I organize, my garage workshop is cluttered with 14 years and 4 growing kid’s worth of belongings. I found a lumber mill stamp on one of the pieces, but couldn’t find the sequence during 3 hours of web searching, although I came across several references to pallet stamps. Can anyone help me by identifying my mystery find, so I can determine how to preserve it and what to use it for?. Let me know if a picture of the end grain would help, because I’m dying to put this to good use! Thanks for the help in advance :o)


18 replies so far

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

695 posts in 1446 days


#1 posted 05-23-2016 01:38 PM

Next week the 30th is Memorial Day just an FYI, but that looks to be Osage Orange possibly.

-- Nick, "Choking to death on bacon is like getting murdered by your lover." - JG

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Lazyman

694 posts in 851 days


#2 posted 05-23-2016 01:52 PM

Looks a little like lauan to me.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#3 posted 05-23-2016 02:02 PM

No telling but that stamp is the key. Somewhere in that code is the country of origin and species.

Most likely crating material from the Pacific rim area.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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dbray45

3186 posts in 2240 days


#4 posted 05-23-2016 02:26 PM

Make something nice out of it and enjoy it.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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texasjoker

2 posts in 242 days


#5 posted 05-23-2016 04:55 PM



Next week the 30th is Memorial Day just an FYI, but that looks to be Osage Orange possibly.

- UpstateNYdude


Well I feel silly! My wall calendar shares the 23rd and 30th in the same box, so my apologies for the oversight.
After further research I found the IPPC country codes here http://ephyto.ippc.int/ISO-country.
The pieces came from Thailand, and they only use number graiding, so it could be Osage Orange indeed! I’ll have to scope the end grain to tell which species for certain, but I’m thinking either Osage Orange, or Polynesian Maple. Either way it’s a score for me here in Texas, where the choices are Yellow Pine or Red Oak unless buying top dollar from specialty suppliers.
Thanks for the replies, and have a great woodworking day, Lumberjocks!

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Tennessee

2410 posts in 1978 days


#6 posted 05-23-2016 06:28 PM

It is indeed an Asian Rim pallet wood.
To me, it looks a whole lot like the wooden legs I used in Shanghai and here in the US for Catnapper furniture. That was a fast growing type of mahogany, had that orangish tint as in your pictures, is rather tough but light, and grows like a weed in multiple Asian Rim countries.
Kind of Philippine Mahogany meets Sapale meets common maple.

We called it “rubberwood”, since it had a tendency to take a beating, which furniture legs certainly do when on things like sofas. It was so common that a lot of Asia used it for pallets. I don’t think you got a piece of osage orange.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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mobrien

1 post in 1552 days


#7 posted 05-23-2016 07:06 PM

I saw some Osage Orange in a exotic wood rack at Rockler or somewhere and thought it was an exotic species from Japan or Asia, then I realized that is what we call Bodark (Bois d’arc) or Horse Apple tree here in Dallas, where it is a considered a big time weed tree by most, although it’s hard, rot resistant wood is probably under most of the old DFW pier and beam houses the Yuppies live in, and landowners use it for fence posts and turn of the century it was planted for fence lines and erosion protection. Funny how something so common can be greatly desired if you don’t have it around you.

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Kazooman

626 posts in 1416 days


#8 posted 05-23-2016 08:16 PM


Next week the 30th is Memorial Day just an FYI, but that looks to be Osage Orange possibly.

- UpstateNYdude

Well I feel silly! My wall calendar shares the 23rd and 30th in the same box, so my apologies for the oversight.

- texasjoker

Well…. Veteran’s Day is November 11th. Have a happy Memorial Day and enjoy your free wood!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#9 posted 05-24-2016 12:30 AM

That is NOT Osage Orange for sure. Some of the grain looks like the elm I cut here (that feathery grain).

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3206 days


#10 posted 05-24-2016 03:48 AM

Based on the coding – I don’t see a species

The first line TH is Thailand
rest of first line is coded.

HT is Heat Treated – so it is going to be darker than the true raw wood which will make this pretty tough to figure species
DB is debarked.
DOA Department of Agriculture

examples of heat treated wood – - Fine Woodworking
Few would identify the middle board as Maple on appearance and that color is all the way through.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View wuddoc's profile

wuddoc

93 posts in 3181 days


#11 posted 05-24-2016 04:41 AM

The Federal Forest Product Lab in Madison, Wisconsin at one time would ID wood for an individual. You would send them a certain size sample and they would identify it.

Forestry schools within a University might be helpful.
Texas A&M Forest Service, Mississippi State, Virginia Tech, Univ. of Mass all have forest product departments

You may find at a library a book; Identifying Wood by R. Bruce Hoadley where he breaks done the steps to ID wood. species.

International wood group at http://iawa-website.org/

-- Wuddoc

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#12 posted 05-24-2016 04:49 AM

Hobbithouseinc.org is a great site as well

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2281 days


#13 posted 05-24-2016 11:51 AM

I may be wrong, but I think the heat-treating that wood goes through for pallets is not the same as the process involved in darkening those boards in the FWW article. The HT you have requires that the core of the board reaches 56 Celcius for 30 minutes and it changes the color very little. Whereas roasting or torrefying wood involves kiln-drying to 4% then cooking it at 350 F for 4 hours.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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DrDirt

4169 posts in 3206 days


#14 posted 05-24-2016 09:47 PM



I may be wrong, but I think the heat-treating that wood goes through for pallets is not the same as the process involved in darkening those boards in the FWW article. The HT you have requires that the core of the board reaches 56 Celcius for 30 minutes and it changes the color very little. Whereas roasting or torrefying wood involves kiln-drying to 4% then cooking it at 350 F for 4 hours.

- jdh122


That is a good point – - but the heat treating article was also discussing using the wood for decks instead of Pressure treating with chemicals. But it may be that the temps needed to kill bugs, would be lower than what is needed to make the wood more rot resistant.

you can get thermotreated at teh Borg
http://www.thermotreatedwood.com/Well%20Done%20Products.html

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1939 days


#15 posted 05-25-2016 01:57 AM

It is a tropical hardwood for sure.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

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