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Forum topic by dalec posted 12-10-2007 07:50 PM 788 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dalec

613 posts in 2643 days


12-10-2007 07:50 PM

I have novice question about wood grain. I have a figured maple board that I gave some thought to ripping and gluing to get the board thickness I wanted for a box. I have decided after advice from a number of you to resaw instead.

I tacked a question on to my last response to the subject, but probably should have started a new topic.

The question I have is if I were to rip a nicely grained hardwood board would the newly exposed side graining hold any possibility of nice grain pattern? I am thinking, I suspect I would lose the nice grain because of the way the grain runs, but I thought I would ask experience LJ’s what your experience has been.

Dalec


12 replies so far

View dustynewt's profile

dustynewt

647 posts in 2617 days


#1 posted 12-10-2007 08:19 PM

DaleC,
You should get the same grain pattern throughout the board. That is one of the reasons why veneers are made. When the board offers exceptional beauty they slice it to get more of that pattern to adhere to a substrate.
One thing you might do once you have your band saw set up to resaw the board is to test run it with a board of similar width and hardness to make sure that blade drift and squareness have been accurately accounted for. It would be a shame to get into that nice figured maple and realize that it is going crooked. Also, smooth the cut side before the next pass if you are slicing multiple leaves. Have fun!

-- Peace in Wood ~ http://dustynewt.com/

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dalec

613 posts in 2643 days


#2 posted 12-10-2007 08:41 PM

Hi Dustynewt,

Just wanted to confirm, I don’t know if I was as clear as I should be: If I rip a figured grain board will the side 90 degrees to the figured side hold similar pattern? I know if I resawed the figured side, I will get similar grain pattern.

Thanks,

Dalec

View che's profile

che

123 posts in 2781 days


#3 posted 12-10-2007 09:18 PM

You should be able to tell by looking at the exposed edge grain. I’m pretty sure “tiger” stripes show on the edge of the board, burl should show as well. Not sure about the others. I wonder what crotch “feathering” looks like from the side?

-- Che.

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dalec

613 posts in 2643 days


#4 posted 12-10-2007 09:27 PM

Thanks Che,

I will have to clean up the edge, so I should see what the grain looks like.

Dalec

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4441 posts in 2717 days


#5 posted 12-10-2007 10:07 PM

If you have a piece of real quarter sawn lumber the edge would be flat sawn and vice versa. How the grain is oriented will determine the look. If the board has a very nice grain the way it is I would re-saw it not rip it. That way you can have book matched pieces.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

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dalec

613 posts in 2643 days


#6 posted 12-10-2007 10:50 PM

Thos,

I looked at the grain pattern again after receiving your comments and it looks from this novice that the board is not quarter sawn. So the nice graining is as you suggested, best resawed and not ripped. So much to learn!

Thanks

Dalec

View dustynewt's profile

dustynewt

647 posts in 2617 days


#7 posted 12-10-2007 11:43 PM

That’s what we are all about. Learning. Sorry I misunderstood your question Dalec. I hope it works out for you.

-- Peace in Wood ~ http://dustynewt.com/

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dalec

613 posts in 2643 days


#8 posted 12-11-2007 05:18 AM

I appreciate you taking to time to respond to my questions and your effort to educate me.

Dalec

View TreeBones's profile

TreeBones

1824 posts in 2778 days


#9 posted 12-17-2007 07:41 PM

I think Che hit the nail on the head. Here is a little on sawing methods.

-- Ron, Twain Harte, Ca. Portable on site Sawmill Service http://westcoastlands.net/Sawmill.html http://westcoastlands.net/SawBucks2/phpBB3 http://www.portablesawmill.info

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 2643 days


#10 posted 12-17-2007 10:32 PM

Thanks TreeBones,

I have read another piece explaining plane and quarter sawn. Everytime, I read it get get it a little more, slow learner here.

Dalec

View LONGHAIR's profile

LONGHAIR

94 posts in 2569 days


#11 posted 12-19-2007 04:14 AM

The grain that you see will almost always change dramatically if you turn it 90 degrees. Of course some more than others, but there will be some for sure. I saw a post on another forum where the poster was confused by the ray fleck pattern, on white oak, when cutting strips for edgebanding. He was cutting thin strips from a flat sawn board…and turning them. This gives you quarter sawn parts, desired in many cases, not this time though. Simple solution, start with quarter sawn wood, then when you turn them you get flat sawn grain.
That being said, the “figure” (chatoyance) of “figured maple” is not the same as the grain. The figure goes through. It will show on the egde of a board, though it may reflect light differently than the adjacent face, making it look darker/lighter.

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dalec

613 posts in 2643 days


#12 posted 12-19-2007 06:22 AM

Thanks Longhair.

I have never paid much attention to figured woods and now I am seeing just how beautify the figuring can be and what a wood worker can do with it is just amazing to me. Each board is like a treasure that you want to use in its best way to show its unique figuring and how it plays with the light.

Dalec

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