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Delta Unisaw Model # 34-801F questions

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Forum topic by kennyd posted 04-07-2010 05:39 AM 5335 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kennyd

103 posts in 2464 days


04-07-2010 05:39 AM

Hi everyone,

I’ve been searching for a table saw upgrade and I think I’ve found it. Just wanted to check in with you folks here and see what you think. Initially I was trying to keep within my budget of around $300 – 400 but then I ran into this deal and I think I have to jump on it.

It’s a Delta Unisaw, Model# 34-801F with a 52” Delta Unifence #36-889, Delta outfeed table, Delta sliding miter table, and an additional Delta support table to the right of the saw. Sorry, in my haste to get some answers here I ran off without those part numbers. It also comes with 2 sets of stacked dado blades, a 10” Freud set and another 8” set that I can’t remember the manufacturer, a bunch or regular 10” blades of various tooth count, and some jigs that the owner has laying around as well.

It seems to be in fantastic shape. A little dusty from sitting for a couple years but it looks and operates great. The blade adjustment wheels turn smoothly, the fence seems to be rock solid, and motor is quiet as well.

The only negative for me at the moment is that it’s wired for 220 which I don’t have in my shop. I have no more room in my main breaker panel so I have to add a sub-panel before I can even use the saw. Not a bad thing but with all of my budget money going for the saw I won’t have the funds for the panel yet. Anyway, I can grab this saw up for $700.00 and the fellow that’s selling it to me will even let me pay him the $400 that I have and then pay the balance off over a couple of weeks. He’s a great guy who just doesn’t want to own a cabinet shop anymore. He closed the business down a couple years ago and his machinery has been sitting in his shop ever since. I should also tell you that I recently purchased his Powermatic #044 14” bandsaw for $225.00 and that’s in mint condition as well.

Is there anything I should be taking a hard look at on the saw to determine the condition other than the basics that I’ve mentioned? I’ve never owned a saw like this but it sure has been a dream of mine for a while now.

OK, I’m rambling so I’ll post this and wait for your valued input.

Thanks in advance,

Kenny

-- Kenny... The man who needs a tool he doesn't have is already paying for it.


18 replies so far

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grumpycarp

257 posts in 3210 days


#1 posted 04-07-2010 07:40 AM

I tried to dl the manual for you but couldn’t find it on the dewalt/delta/portercable/ site. I “Know” that most tablesaw motors and many other induction start motors can be 120/240 v. mine included.

It is alleged to be a very simple matter to change this and though I have not done so personally, I’ll bet many jocks have. In your case it would be something like disconnecting a lead wire at the motor end and probably changing the plug on the other end. I wouldn’t call it a deal breaker if this fits your budget. You won’t have to re-wire your garage or anything. There are plenty of online resources besides this one that deal with this very issue, just wanted to chime in and let you know. If you want it, get it and figure out the downgrade in wiring later.

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kennyd

103 posts in 2464 days


#2 posted 04-07-2010 01:55 PM

Hi grumpy,

I should have been more specific. I don’t want to change the saw to 120. I just have to wait a little bit before I have the funds to add the sub-panel. I was more interested in what others thought of the deal.

Thank you though.

Kenny

-- Kenny... The man who needs a tool he doesn't have is already paying for it.

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doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 3457 days


#3 posted 04-07-2010 02:15 PM

well let me throw this out there for you. 1 the additions on this saw are worth more then you are paying for the saw. the uni fence went for over 400 bucs the sliding miter was another 300.

it largely depends on the motor you have as to weather or not it can be re wired for 110 the motor will say right on it weather or not it can be

to me this one is a no brainier what are you working with now?

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View kennyd's profile

kennyd

103 posts in 2464 days


#4 posted 04-07-2010 02:34 PM

Morning gumwood,

I thought so too. I didn’t know that the fence and sliding table were add-ons though.

As far for the motor, I’m not going to change it to 110. I’m going to install a sub-panel for my basement shop and add a 220 circuit.

One thing that I only realized when I saw the saw and outfeed tables was how large it is! It’s almost 7’ x 7’. I made a quick sketch of my shop floorplan and found it’s going to be a squeeze to get it in there as it takes up a lot of space. There’s no doubt that the saw will be the centerpiece of my shop. I’ll have to do some rethinking on the layout but the shop is in the middle of an overhaul anyway.

The saw I’m using now is a Ryobi 10” BT3100 with the small sliding miter table. Not a bad saw but it has an aluminum top, no real miter slot to speak of, and a fence that really doesnt allow for any shopmade add-ons. Also, I’m finding that while I’m ripping thicker stock or making edge cuts prior to resawing on my bandsaw the saw pops breakers or the blade just wobbles like mad and it’s scaring the heck out of me. This saw was fine when I was just using it for working around the house and making some small items but as I’m growing and learning some of the finer points and new techniques in my woodworking this saw is just not cutting it. Pun intended.

Thanks for the response.

Kenny

-- Kenny... The man who needs a tool he doesn't have is already paying for it.

View doyoulikegumwood's profile

doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 3457 days


#5 posted 04-07-2010 02:45 PM

well it sounds like your sold on the saw and being a recent uni saw owner myself “under similar conditions” i have to say there is no way you will be disappointed.

here a few things you will want to do getting the saw set back up once you get it home.

1 new belt preferable a matched set. allot of guys like those twist link belts but i could never get a clear picture if they were worth it on a uni saw as the thing runs damn near silent to start with.

2 while moving it if you remove the top then is the time to get in their and clean clean clean then lube lube lube.

the ubi saw is very straight forward from their. set up far easier then on contractor.

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5179 posts in 2659 days


#6 posted 04-07-2010 05:05 PM

Greetings Kenny: All I can say is that you can’t go wrong with a Unisaw in my opinion. I have a ‘09 X5 that I bought brand new last July. It’s also got the 52” Biesemeyer fence and outfeed table on the right side. You can handle a full 4×8 sheet of ply with no problem. I also built a 4’x8’ outfeed table to complement the saw, and have an old Sears contractor saw backed up to the outfeed table to run dados and rabbits on only. If you have the room for the Unisaw, I would deffently snag it. Keep it at 220 volts, not 110 as some have sugessted. You’ll be glad you got it, believe me….well worth the bucks….. keep on keeping on….. later.

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

View Michael Murphy's profile

Michael Murphy

452 posts in 2469 days


#7 posted 04-07-2010 06:15 PM

Buy it. You won’t be dissapointed and unless you really trash it somehow, it will hold it’s resale value.

-- Michael Murphy, Woodland, CA.

View kennyd's profile

kennyd

103 posts in 2464 days


#8 posted 04-08-2010 03:29 AM

I’ve made the commitment to buy the saw. Now I need to finish up the framing, electrical, and OSB board for the walls. I’ve also got a few shop cabinets to build before I get the saw into the shop. My shop is pretty small at 18’ x 18’ so the saw is going to take up quite a bit of space. I have a furnace and water heater that are also competing for about 20 sq. ft. of the space but I can live with the remaining space for now. I’ve drawn the floor plan in sketchup and have jockeyed all of my tools around in it until I’ve found a workable design. It’ll be a little cramped but it should be OK for now.

Thanks for all of your input. I’ll post some pictures when I have the saw in the shop.

Kenny

-- Kenny... The man who needs a tool he doesn't have is already paying for it.

View Fallon's profile

Fallon

86 posts in 2592 days


#9 posted 04-11-2010 08:00 AM

I paid about the same for my ‘86 Unisaw that needed a bit of work & came with no extras.

Mine is 220v only. I think that anything over 2hp or so is really only going to be 220v. A 110v saw at the 3hp range could pull over 15 or 20 amps making it unusable on any normal household 110v circuit.

Depending on the vintage of your particular saw http://www.owwm.com might have the manual, and if not, most of the stuff on the Unisaws hasn’t changed much at all.

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kennyd

103 posts in 2464 days


#10 posted 04-11-2010 03:02 PM

Hi Fallon,

I found the manuals for the saw and all of the accessories. I have an electrician coming to the house today to help me with the re-wiring of the shop/basement. We’re running a 220 line for the saw and 20 amp circuits for all of the new outlets. Also, new wiring for for lights. Everything for the shop will be on its own sub-panel. I should have the wall framing and OSB wallboard done by tonight and then I can start putting the shop back together.

Thanks for the response.

Kennny

-- Kenny... The man who needs a tool he doesn't have is already paying for it.

View grumpycarp's profile

grumpycarp

257 posts in 3210 days


#11 posted 04-28-2010 11:18 PM

Hey Kenny,

If it isn’t already too late, as long as you’re adding a sub-panel Why not go ahead and an additional drop for a 220V. dust collector and maybe even another 220 for a welder? I wouldn’t calc in the amp draw for both the dust collector and the welder as one would almost certainly not be operating at the same time as the other . . .I didn’t realize at the time of my original comment that you were going to add a sub panel. Now would be the time to future proof the shop. And every galoot needs a welder . . .(and another hammer).

Good luck form an envious viewer . . .

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HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3192 days


#12 posted 04-28-2010 11:49 PM

I know I’m too late to the party, but maybe this can help some others that don’t do electrical themselves (like me). If your breaker box is full because it is out of slots, but it has the capacity to handle the tool in terms of electricity, you could potentially take some of the circuits you have and consolidate them 2-for-1 into slimline breakers. I don’t know what the code is for how to do this, but I know they sell them. Essentially, 2 breakers will only take up one slot this way. Do this a few times and you’ll have some new slots to use.

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grumpycarp

257 posts in 3210 days


#13 posted 04-29-2010 01:52 AM

HM, I say this with all humility, but your advice might lead to a fire. It is not about “space” in the box” but about load carrying ability of available wiring. You can’t just make “room” for another breaker. It is critical that one knows the load carrying ability of the drop FROM THE POLE TO THE PANEL TO BE TAPPED. You can certainly make room for additional breakers but you need to secure for the demand. In other words, “you can ask, but you night not receive.”

Adding additional load to underserved or underwired infrastructure will only lead to increased resistance\heat, and this will be bad . . .

View kennyd's profile

kennyd

103 posts in 2464 days


#14 posted 04-29-2010 03:11 AM

Hi grumpy and Hokie,

grump, I added another 220 line for just the reasons you mentioned. I actually did it today. The electrician is supposed to be here to finish the wiring to the sub-panel today. Unfortunately he hasn’t shown up yet.

Hokie, I thought about the slim line breakers but in the end I chose to go the sub-panel route. It was cheap enough sisnce I was doing all of the wiring myself. The only thing the electrician is doing for me is connecting the sub-panel to the main breaker

-- Kenny... The man who needs a tool he doesn't have is already paying for it.

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HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3192 days


#15 posted 04-29-2010 03:16 PM

we did the same thing. i added a sub as well and had someone else install it. I can add individual circuits after that. I don’t regret it at all, but it costs a lot more. just curious, but do you know what gauge wire the electrician used to install the sub and what amperage the sub is rated for?

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