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Restoring Craftsman Table Saw

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Forum topic by Chris Januski posted 05-17-2016 02:59 PM 669 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chris Januski

19 posts in 209 days


05-17-2016 02:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman table saw restore

My father-in-law gave me an old 12” Craftsman table saw that has been sitting outside for at least 3 years. It’s pretty rusted, both the top and internal pieces. I think the model number is 133.29950. I started disassembling and cleaning off the rust and in the process of taking the saw apart, the front trunnion snapped where it bolts to the table. I’m not sure if there is a way to fix this (JB Weld?) or if I should look for a new front trunnion. The piece is cast iron, there is a pic of the clean break. I’ve been reading the other forums on recommendations on how to clean the top. I don’t have a pic of the top with me (will post one soon), will it hurt the top to take a brass brush on an angle grinder to it or is their a better way?


14 replies so far

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01ntrain

146 posts in 535 days


#1 posted 05-17-2016 03:07 PM

JB weld isn’t gonna fix that trunnion. I wouldn’t even attempt it. But, you may be OK with 3 of the 4 bolts. Use a fender washer on the bolt with the busted eyelet. This might be enough to stabilize it.

Good luck. That’s a pretty old saw. I doubt if you can find any replacement parts.

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#2 posted 05-17-2016 04:59 PM

I would jb weld it because what do you have to lose? The replacement part will be the cost of another saw.

JB then drill and tap for two machine screws for reinforcement.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#3 posted 05-17-2016 05:20 PM

It can be welded back on. If you don’t have that ability, any local welding shop should be able to do it. Even mig will work if that’s all you got.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Chris Januski

19 posts in 209 days


#4 posted 05-17-2016 05:51 PM

Thanks for the tips guys. What do you guys prefer to use as a lubricant/rust remover/preventer for both the gears and the top?

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#5 posted 05-17-2016 05:57 PM

Remove the rust first, then worry about lubrication/protection. For rust removal, there are a zillion ways to go about it… electrolysis, evaporust, phosphoric acid, molasses, citric acid, etc, etc, etc… After cleaning, for gears and other moving parts, a good dry lube or paraffin wax works well and won’t attract sawdust. For the top, regular Johnson’s paste wax. An easy way to get the little nuts, bolts, washers and other small stuff coated with wax, you can mix up some paraffin wax in mineral spirits and just dunk them in the solution. Once the MS flashes off, they will have a nice coat of wax left on them. Something like this makes it pretty easy:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Chris Januski

19 posts in 209 days


#6 posted 05-17-2016 08:30 PM

Brad,
Great idea for the little parts. Thanks for all of the advice. Here are a couple of pics of the table saw top. I’ll post some more as the work goes on

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#7 posted 05-18-2016 03:35 AM

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McFly

188 posts in 492 days


#8 posted 05-18-2016 12:24 PM

Cast iron can be anywhere from very difficult to damn near impossible weld properly if you don’t have experience working with it. Use caution and talk to someone who knows their stuff when it comes to welding cast materials.

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Chris Januski

19 posts in 209 days


#9 posted 05-26-2016 12:56 PM

It’s been a slow process working on the table saw, but its coming along. Unfortunately I can only work on it 1 day a week at the most with everything else going on in my life. Here are some updated photos of the top.

I sprayed the underside with 2 coats of semi-gloss black rustoleum.

After sanding down the top I noticed some pitting. Is this just something I am going to have to live with? Is the pitting going to have an effect on wood sliding across the top surface?

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#10 posted 05-26-2016 01:04 PM

After sanding down the top I noticed some pitting. Is this just something I am going to have to live with?

Yes – unless you want to drop a bunch of cash to have it re-ground.

Is the pitting going to have an effect on wood sliding across the top surface?
- ChrisJanuski

That table is in great shape and what little pitting there is will have no effect. Give it a good wax and it will be fine.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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HokieKen

1780 posts in 604 days


#11 posted 05-26-2016 02:24 PM

Ditto on what Brad said^ As long as the table is relatively flat you’re good. Pitting won’t hurt a thing.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#12 posted 05-26-2016 06:13 PM

Something to consider, John Heisz and Matthias Wandel have both experimented with putting thin coats of polyurethane on cast iron tops for long term rust protection and are reportedly getting good results. They wipe on a one thin coat and let it dry. Probably a great idea with that pitting. You could also fill the pits with metal epoxy and sand the top down again. But they won’t hurt anything if you leave them, unless they are big enough to collect stuff that will scratch wood as it slides across.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1490 days


#13 posted 05-29-2016 01:30 AM

Cast iron can be brazed. Makes a very strong joint.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Chris Januski

19 posts in 209 days


#14 posted 08-29-2016 08:25 PM

It’s been a while since I have had a chance to work on the saw. I stripped and repainted the entire saw base and stand and replaced all of the hardware. Here is how it is looking so far.

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