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ShopSmith Model 10ER

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Forum topic by eaglerider posted 05-16-2016 02:31 PM 511 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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eaglerider

1 post in 210 days


05-16-2016 02:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: vintage shopsmith lathe working condition multiple accessories included so cal no deliveries 500obo txt rick at 213 509-two two 63


12 replies so far

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3927 posts in 2711 days


#1 posted 05-16-2016 03:40 PM

I had one in a lot better condition than that one and I only paid $100 for it.

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#2 posted 05-16-2016 04:12 PM

I have 3 of them and the most I paid was $250 and it had the optional speed changer that sells for about $175 on EBay.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#3 posted 05-16-2016 11:49 PM

Good luck!
I paid $50 for mine and it has a speed changer.
Even with a changer you would be lucky to get better than $100 for that one.
OK, with the jointer maybe $150 (still lucky)

IMHO

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View CharleyL's profile

CharleyL

197 posts in 2832 days


#4 posted 05-17-2016 12:12 AM

They only sold for $150 new back in the late 40’s and very early 50’s. They were made by a company called Magnus, which later sold the rights to the present Shop Smith Company, who completely redesigned it. You can get parts for the ones made by the present Shop Smith Company, but not the ones that were made by Magnus. However, the present Shop Smith Company will send you a reprint of the manual for it if you ask them.

I have a 10 ER without the variable speed option, 3 pulley speeds only. The major weak point in these is the cast aluminum brake piece that is supposed to prevent the assemblies from moving on the rails. I ended up having some new ones machined out of solid brass and I can now lock the head, carriage, etc. in any position without a problem. I chose brass for these because of it’s sticky tendency when pressed hard against steel. It works for this purpose very well. They even hold when tipping the machine up on end to make a drill press out of it. To me, the 10 ER makes a fair wood lathe, a not-so-great drill press, a downright scary table saw, and an OK disk sander or horizontal boring machine. Mine sits in the corner of my shop, unused, until I need to make a lathe turning. Then I clean off the sawdust and cob webs, and make the spindle or other part that I need. It then begins collecting saw dust and cob webs again for the next year or two.

I’m not a turner, but I can and will turn if I need something that requires turning. If I enjoyed turning, I would buy a real wood lathe and scrap this thing.

Charley

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#5 posted 05-17-2016 01:18 AM



They only sold for $150 new back in the late 40 s and very early 50 s. They were made by a company called Magnus, which later sold the rights to the present Shop Smith Company, who completely redesigned it. You can get parts for the ones made by the present Shop Smith Company, but not the ones that were made by Magnus. However, the present Shop Smith Company will send you a reprint of the manual for it if you ask them.

I have a 10 ER without the variable speed option, 3 pulley speeds only. The major weak point in these is the cast aluminum brake piece that is supposed to prevent the assemblies from moving on the rails. I ended up having some new ones machined out of solid brass and I can now lock the head, carriage, etc. in any position without a problem. I chose brass for these because of it s sticky tendency when pressed hard against steel. It works for this purpose very well. They even hold when tipping the machine up on end to make a drill press out of it. To me, the 10 ER makes a fair wood lathe, a not-so-great drill press, a downright scary table saw, and an OK disk sander or horizontal boring machine. Mine sits in the corner of my shop, unused, until I need to make a lathe turning. Then I clean off the sawdust and cob webs, and make the spindle or other part that I need. It then begins collecting saw dust and cob webs again for the next year or two.

I m not a turner, but I can and will turn if I need something that requires turning. If I enjoyed turning, I would buy a real wood lathe and scrap this thing.

Charley

- CharleyL

No it was Magna Engineering, and they make great drill presses, lathes do to there weight. and length. I own 3 of them with speed changers, know what you are talking about B4 you give answers or opinions!!!

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#6 posted 05-17-2016 01:34 AM

eaglerider,
go here, the Shop Smith Forum and ask your questions, not some of the idiots here. Pick the right forum.
http://shopsmith.com/ss_forum/index.php

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#7 posted 05-17-2016 01:41 AM


They only sold for $150 new back in the late 40 s and very early 50 s. They were made by a company called Magnus, which later sold the rights to the present Shop Smith Company, who completely redesigned it. You can get parts for the ones made by the present Shop Smith Company, but not the ones that were made by Magnus. However, the present Shop Smith Company will send you a reprint of the manual for it if you ask them.

I have a 10 ER without the variable speed option, 3 pulley speeds only. The major weak point in these is the cast aluminum brake piece that is supposed to prevent the assemblies from moving on the rails. I ended up having some new ones machined out of solid brass and I can now lock the head, carriage, etc. in any position without a problem. I chose brass for these because of it s sticky tendency when pressed hard against steel. It works for this purpose very well. They even hold when tipping the machine up on end to make a drill press out of it. To me, the 10 ER makes a fair wood lathe, a not-so-great drill press, a downright scary table saw, and an OK disk sander or horizontal boring machine. Mine sits in the corner of my shop, unused, until I need to make a lathe turning. Then I clean off the sawdust and cob webs, and make the spindle or other part that I need. It then begins collecting saw dust and cob webs again for the next year or two.

I m not a turner, but I can and will turn if I need something that requires turning. If I enjoyed turning, I would buy a real wood lathe and scrap this thing.

Charley

- CharleyL


The ER was the first one and you cant get parts from SS for it, then when they redesigned it now for those you can still get parts for those. DF, [removed]

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1964 posts in 1456 days


#8 posted 05-17-2016 02:02 AM

Amazing that one can get so upset about a Shopsmith 10 ER. Someone is going to burn out a bearing…

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2230 days


#9 posted 05-17-2016 02:19 AM

I don’t know beans about a Shop Smith – but – a member of our woodturning club has one, and he turns the most beautiful segmented pieces anybody will ever see.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2265 days


#10 posted 05-17-2016 02:34 AM

They are great machines. Intrinsically they are most certainly worth more than the asking price here. The sad truth however is that the market for this fine old iron is just not there and lots of them are available for much less.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#11 posted 05-17-2016 02:40 AM

To DF,
http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=2747


Amazing that one can get so upset about a Shopsmith 10 ER. Someone is going to burn out a bearing…

- Redoak49


[removed], my 3 have the originality bearings in them. Can you say that about any 66 year old machine you have?
[removed]

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3927 posts in 2711 days


#12 posted 05-17-2016 04:58 PM

The original 10-ER was sold through Montgomery Ward. If space is a problem, a Shopsmith is the perfect answer. I’m sorry I sold mine (bought it for $100 and sold it for $100 two years later). I still have the 12” sanding disc that came with it and use it on a spare motor with a shop made table.

For the NCIS fans out there, there was an episode where a Shopsmith 10-ER was seen in Gibb’s basement shop.

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