LumberJocks

Sycamore log

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by rwe2156 posted 05-14-2016 11:26 AM 527 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2200 posts in 948 days


05-14-2016 11:26 AM

I have access to some logs approx 36 diameter they will not fit on my buddy’s bandsaw mill.

My question is can I split sycamore? The logs are about 5 feet long and very well dried.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


7 replies so far

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1943 days


#1 posted 05-14-2016 11:50 AM

No, not very easily because it has spiral grain. You can cut it into quarters with a chainsaw, or split it with a chainsaw. If you don’t quartersaw the lumber, it is very prone to warp and twist due to the spiral grain. Beautiful figure when quartersawn. I sell a good bit of it.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#2 posted 05-14-2016 12:24 PM

Take it a real sawmill and have it quartersawn, you will really like the results. QS sycamore is drop-dead beautiful.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2200 posts in 948 days


#3 posted 05-14-2016 01:43 PM

Also the wood has tons of checks both in ends and surfaces (bark is off).

Very weathered, but solid no signs of rot.

I was thinking maybe it could be spalted.

Though if I could get a log opened up first to see if worth it to resaw.
I can do that with my chainsaw but its a lot of work.

Am I wasting my time?

Fred, the reason is the larger logs won’t fit in his sawmill.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#4 posted 05-14-2016 02:32 PM


Fred, the reason is the larger logs won t fit in his sawmill.

- rwe2156

Yeah, I got that. A “real sawmill” won’t have a problem with them, though getting them there might be impossible. Bandmills are great, but a lot of them do have size limitations.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

700 posts in 691 days


#5 posted 05-14-2016 02:52 PM

If you’re good at cutting straight with a chainsaw, you can quarter it first with the chainsaw and then your buddy can then do the milling. Make sure you have a good rip chain and mark a chalk line or something to help keep the cut as straight as possible. That will help you reduce waste.

After your first cut down the center, you’ll see whether it’s worth it to continue.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

394 posts in 686 days


#6 posted 05-14-2016 04:59 PM

Am I wasting my time?

imo, no.
whats the max size of log you can get on the mill and the carraige will clear?
ive seen oversized logs that the carraige will clear get whittled down in somewhat of an octogonal pattern until small enough to start cutting slabs.

we like pictures!!!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2200 posts in 948 days


#7 posted 05-14-2016 09:21 PM

AZ – Explain what is a “rip chain”? I just got a new chain for my saw at the Stihl dealer when I was there I asked him about a rip chain for chain saw mill he said there is no such thing just another type chain with smaller teeth. Is that all it is?

Fred the reason I am using him is he does it for me as a friend. He has a very nice machine.

Tomsteve – Hadn’t thought of that. Duh.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com