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Cabinet saw bearing noise ?'s

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Forum topic by athomas5009 posted 05-13-2016 07:03 PM 614 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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athomas5009

293 posts in 1082 days


05-13-2016 07:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip tablesaw

In the past day or so I have been killing a good amount of lumber in preparation for 3-4 cutting boards. Well today after turning the saw off to take a short break my Cabinet saw came to a rough stop. A bit of grinding noise and a quicker than normal stop.

My saw is a GEneral int. 50-240 GT M1 2hp. I don’t own a true DC yet and just use a 6.5 hp shop vac and separator.

My first reaction was to un plug and check it out. Besides being dusty (no where near filled) nothing appeared wrong. I then tried to spend the blade and it was really hard to. I then reached through the cabinet door and did the same to the belt pully. It was the same at first but after spinning in both directions it loosed a good amount. Besides a good amount of dust film around the trunion and bearings all looked fine. I definetly was not in the mood to stop the project to replace bearings and realign everything especially on a saw that might be 5yo if that.

So I decided to give it a good cleaning making sure to clean trunion/bearings well. It helped but didn’t cure the problem. I then lubed everything and gave a good shot of WD-40 to the trunion and bearings. This really made a difference and after a cpl rounds of running the saw for a minute and shooting with WD-40 all was good. I let it sit for about 30mins then took a cpl rags and whiped off any excess WD-40. I then went back to ripping lumber for a good hour and all was still fine.

There is no play in the arbor or bearings. They are still tight and run true.

What are your thoughts on this?

For the time being I’m just gonna chalk it up to excessive dust grime because of no DC unit. Keep it clean and an eye on it.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.


13 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#1 posted 05-13-2016 07:12 PM

Sounds like your bearings are toast and need to be replaced. WD-40 is a temporary fix and will actually make them worse, as it will wash away what remaining grease there may still be in there. You can keep going as it is, but you risk the possibility of even more expensive damage if you do. Bearings are cheap and easy to replace, and are about the only real point of failure on the machine – both at the arbor and in the motor. Replace them with some quality bearings and you should be good for the next few decades.

Keep in mind that it is basically impossible to visually inspect a bearing to determine if it’s bad or starting to go… unless you open it up and check the condition of the grease, balls and cage. Grinding noises and resistance to turning are however sure signs of impending failure. In many cases, they will fail without warning, so consider yourself lucky :)

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Lack of DC should not be a problem… unless you let it build up to the point of covering the motor and/or arbor.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#2 posted 05-13-2016 08:17 PM

Many people mistake WD-40 as a lube, NOT! I don’t use it on my knees either. :)
You need to really check out the bearing issue before you have a catastrophic failure.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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athomas5009

293 posts in 1082 days


#3 posted 05-13-2016 09:31 PM

I figured the bearings going could be the only culprit. I just had a glimmer of hope because the saw wasn’t that old.

Is there a better spray type lube I could use for the next day or 2 until I’m done with these boards and in a better spot to be out of commission for a day or 2?

Also what do you mean by catastrophic failure? I only need it for an broken up hr or 2 to finish up. I want to know what pushing them a lil more could mean.

Thanks guys

Andrew

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#4 posted 05-13-2016 09:46 PM

It depends on how they fail. If they seize, it could score the shaft and/or housing, requiring machining or replacement to fix. If a cage breaks loose or it ejects a ball or two, it could allow enough play for things to come in contact that were never meant to be in contact – particularly the motor where it could allow the rotor to make contact with the windings, which could result in you basically trashing the motor. They will fail in different ways, but the point is to never let them get to that stage.

If you only have a limited amount of stuff left to to, you might be ok keeping it lubed, keeping an eye out for further problems and taking it easy until done. To make table alignment easier… before you take the table off, raise the blade and lay a straight edge along side it so it hangs off the front and back of the table. Put down some masking tape at the edges and mark where the straight edge hits it. You won’t get it back exactly where it is with this method, but you will get darn close and just need a little bit of tweaking.

And do replace both sets (motor and arbor). If some are already on their way out, the others should not be far behind. It will also give you a chance to clean out the motor, check the centrifugal switch contacts and generally clean and lube things so they are good as new. 5 years is not unreasonable for bearing failure, particularly if cheaper Chinese bearings were used. I’ve seen new bearings fail within a few years because someone wanted to save $1 or two. Quality bearings from some place like Accurate will not only last longer, but in many cases are as inexpensive or even cheaper than what you might find online for no-name ones (even places like vxb).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Sunstealer73's profile

Sunstealer73

121 posts in 1557 days


#5 posted 05-14-2016 12:27 AM

My Sawstop did that after a long ripping session of 8/4 Ash. The motor was scalding hot and felt really tight and gritty when I tried to turn it by hand. It was fine after it cooled and hasn’t done it since.

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cutmantom

389 posts in 2499 days


#6 posted 05-14-2016 12:33 AM

I have seen bearings bad enough that a 1/8” kerf blade made a 3/16+ dado

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1082 days


#7 posted 05-14-2016 01:26 AM

My plan is to change them next weekend or sooner. Just depends on how long it takes me to finish these cutting boards up.

Remember there is bop lay in the bearing. Everything feels tight and spins true.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#8 posted 05-14-2016 02:12 AM

Remember there is no play in the bearing. Everything feels tight and spins true.
- athomas5009

That means nothing – to determine a bearings condition, you need to open it up. Typically it’s just cheaper and easier to replace it so you know for sure. Case in point, here is a bearing from a Baldor motor. The motor ran perfect, no noise, spun freely with no play – in all respects there was nothing indicating a problem.

It may have ‘felt’ perfect, but it was on it’s last gasp.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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athomas5009

293 posts in 1082 days


#9 posted 05-15-2016 02:14 AM

when I change out the bearings I figured it would be a good time to rewire the motor for 220v. My question is do I have to rewire the switch as well? GI doesn’t provide direction for this. They just sat call a electrician lol.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

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MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#10 posted 05-15-2016 05:29 AM

Depends on how your machine is setup. Without knowing what you got, it’s impossible to say for certain.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

2236 posts in 1354 days


#11 posted 05-15-2016 12:35 PM

I would change both the bearings in the motor and the Arbor as long as you’re going to do it. it’s quite easy and quite cheap. I paid less than $40 for sealed bearings from kaman.

Took less than 2 hours to do both.

View unbob's profile

unbob

718 posts in 1368 days


#12 posted 05-15-2016 03:56 PM

I would recommend Accurate bearing also for the higher quality bearings they have. I believe Lynn is the woodworking machine bearing expert there.
My experience with Accurate Bearing is with shaper bearings that were quoted locally at $1250 with a 2month wait, Accurate had the Swiss IBC grade 7 spherical ball bearings that met all the specs for the machine at around $450 delivered.

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athomas5009

293 posts in 1082 days


#13 posted 06-29-2016 10:15 PM

I ended up going with a pair of SKF’s. They swapped out easier than I thought they would considering I used them for a week after the problems started. The blade side hearing was totally fried. Could feel it grind when I turned it in my hand lmao.

I just about ready to get her aligned and running again. When I went to reassemble and align it last night I found a crack in on of my granite slabs. So I had to repair that with some epoxy. It should be dry enough by now. I’ll make a new post on the granite crack / repair for others that run into the same problem.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

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