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Delta 36-725 Build review - By an amateur.

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Forum topic by jwyant posted 05-12-2016 09:13 PM 830 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jwyant

18 posts in 221 days


05-12-2016 09:13 PM

Well, this will be quick, but I wanted to provide some feedback on my build of the Delta 36-725. I am not going to get into WHY I picked this TS, but I can say, my first impression…..I LOVE this saw!

Now, there are some things you should know about me. One, I am by no means an expert in ANYTHING woodworking, heck, this is the first table saw I have ever purchased, built and used. If you have seen my other posts, I recently built a mudroom system for my wife, and I was hooked. The craftsmanship, the tools, the accomplishment is what I love.

So, about the saw. I did the research on TS…I was going to buy the Dewalt 7480 but then for a $100 more, I could get a much better solution (long term). So I moved into hybrid type saws…and it was between the delta 36-725 or the Rigid R4512. The most important feature for me was the fence and its accuracy. Long story short, the Delta won.

Off to Youtube I went watching assembly videos, what the heck did I get myself into…..I mean it seemed like there were no assembly videos that did not curse or complain about the crazy build instructions and how much of a PITA it was to get the rails and fence system correct. Here are the 2 that really helped me:

BEST (IMO): https://youtu.be/STVZWtGcLqA You will have to not care about some language…but its really good.
Close 2nd: https://youtu.be/uKNb4EhjvOA

Now that I am done, the build was not as bad as I thought it was going to be. Yea, the quality is not GREAT, but for me, it was great. I dont mind getting something cheaper and sacrifice in quality a bit, especially since it is my first table saw. The rail system was not that hard to do. What worked for me was the following:

  1. Loosely bolted the front rails to the cast iron top (did not install the stamped sides)
  2. Used the guide, magnets and a level to get the rails nice a close. (Level, flush and within the tolerance of the guide)
  3. Tightened down the bolts so that the rails would not move.
  4. Installed the rear rails the same way, again did not install the side top plates.
  5. Once both the front and rear rails were good, I then use a Dremel to widen the (3) mounting holes of the 2 side plates so I had some vertical movement, so they could be flush with the cast iron.
  6. Installed the side plate by loosely securing the front and rear bolts (that connect the rails) to the plate. I worked from the cast iron side out. I used the measuring guide as a straight edge and made sure the side was flush to the case iron and tightened down the bolt that was closest to the center of the rail system. I then repeated the same process for the rear.
  7. Once I had the side and the cast iron flush, I then used a level to make sure the outer edge of the side was level to the top of the table. Now, I do have a SLIGHT dip in the middle of the plate, but there is nothing I can do about that and it is ok with me. Tightened down the outer bolts.
  8. Repeat the process for the rear and the other side.
  9. I then installed the support bar.
  10. Once it was all set, I verified that everything was in check, then I tightened down ALL rail bolts. Its rock solid now.
  11. Install the guide system.

Now that I am done, I cut my first piece, WOW….it is SO smooth and QUIET. Oh, I installed a Diablo 50T thin kerf blade, so I needed to adjust guide window a bit. Also, I did not have much adjusting on the blade alignment. Videos out there are good and do a great job of explaining how to get it all setup. I bought a Wixey 300 and it makes a world of difference in the confidence that the blade is at X degrees.

Its been a fun build and the reason for me writing this to let anyone who reads this, DONT be intimidated by some of the reviews out there about how HARD the assembly is. This is the first time I have assembled a Table saw….and It was not that bad….challenging at times, but that builds the love and respect for the tool!

It is super quiet….did I mention that…..so much that I was like…really, that is it? :)

Well, off the design my work bench and cut some thin white sheets to cover the underside of some cabinets I installed in the laundry room last weekend.

Thank you for all the help fellow members!


6 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2842 days


#1 posted 05-12-2016 09:33 PM

Sounds like you made a lot of good choices with your budget. Full size saw with belt drive induction motor, upgraded the stock blade, did the alignment….enjoy your new saw!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1196 days


#2 posted 05-12-2016 10:07 PM

It looks like you covered pretty much how you did your build, and now the dreaded but. Why would you have a need to adjust your window for the thin kerf blade. The arbor flange should be zero. It shouldn’t matter what thickness blade you are using as long as you butt up to the flange, unless the arbor flange is on the left side of the blade. ........... Jerry

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#3 posted 05-12-2016 10:14 PM

Why would you have a need to adjust your window for the thin kerf blade.

For a left tilt saw, the arbor flange -is- on the left :) For right-tilt machines, the thickness of the blade is not a concern as the right side of the cut (fence side) is always in line with the arbor flange, even when using a dado stack, regardless of how thick it is. For left-tilt machines, the right edge of the cut (fence side) varies depending on blade thickness. That is one advantage to right-tilt machines.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1196 days


#4 posted 05-13-2016 12:36 AM

Okie dokie Brad, I was just questioning. I looked at the saw and it is a left tilt saw. I shoulda looked before I commented.

Jwyant, cut a couple pieces first, check the size, and just adjust by eye when cutting. Woodworker aren’t machinists, so we can be a 32nd off, and no one will ever notice unless you spill the beans….... Jerry (in Tucson).....

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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jwyant

18 posts in 221 days


#5 posted 05-13-2016 12:51 AM

Nubs,

No worries….I was just checking because, as mentioned, this was my first TS and going from a reg kerf to a thin kerf, it would make sense that there should be an adjustment made.

I made a few test cuts today, and they are dead on!

Thanks for the help everyone!!


Okie dokie Brad, I was just questioning. I looked at the saw and it is a left tilt saw. I shoulda looked before I commented.

Jwyant, cut a couple pieces first, check the size, and just adjust by eye when cutting. Woodworker aren t machinists, so we can be a 32nd off, and no one will ever notice unless you spill the beans….... Jerry (in Tucson).....

- Nubsnstubs


View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

296 posts in 743 days


#6 posted 05-13-2016 03:10 AM

Like you I bought the delta saw and used it for about a year. Later I bought an old unisaw and restored it which I now use. For some reason I hate to get rid of my 725 delta. Everyone tells me to sell it but I keep putting it off for some reason. It’s been sitting in the shop covered up now for about 6 months. I keep telling everyone that I’m keeping it in case my unisaw breaks. I guess I’ll sell it one day but will hate it when I do cause I still love the way it cut, and like you said it’s quiet.
Gerald

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