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Benchtop Thicknesser to Moulding Machine

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Forum topic by KeithusMaximus posted 05-11-2016 01:21 PM 376 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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KeithusMaximus

3 posts in 731 days


05-11-2016 01:21 PM

Hey Lumberjocks,

Had a quick look and couldn’t find a thread that matches my query exactly.

I am limited in respect of space and money and am in need of a moulding machine. I have seen the various products that will fit the bill and I am aware that I could do most of the work with a router but I am also limited in time – Not much to work with right?

I do have a benchtop thicknesser and was wondering whether this could be SAFELY used as a moulder with custom knives.

The Machine i have is similar to the Jet JWP-12. For those not familiar, here’s the manual http://www.misgroupinc.com/partfiles/M-708521.pdf

Now my immediate thoughts were as long as the knife is centered in the machine and the mount is the full length of the roller and coupled with some sort of sled that can serve the clamp the piece this could be possible. it also goes without saying that anything that requires large volume of material is either cut in multiple passes or removed prior to shaping.

I am fairly fond of my hands, arms and face so if this is a totally stupid idea then please feel free to say so :)

Does anyone have any thoughts?


6 replies so far

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Bill White

4459 posts in 3428 days


#1 posted 05-11-2016 02:05 PM

I wouldn’t, but that’s just me.
How much molding do you expect to need? Why not use the router?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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KeithusMaximus

3 posts in 731 days


#2 posted 05-11-2016 02:11 PM



I wouldn t, but that s just me.
How much molding do you expect to need? Why not use the router?
Bill

- Bill White

Hi Bill,

Some of the moulding I wish to produce could be very time consuming on a router, bit changes and angle configuration and not to mention the cost of more specialist router bits etc. Time and money are the sole reasons for looking at this alternative.

I can produce an example and have a steel knife cut by a local firm for a reasonable fee.

Could you please elaborate your reasoning for not doing this so as to better understand why this is a concern to you?

Many thanks :)

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Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#3 posted 05-11-2016 02:28 PM

I can’t answer your question but keep in mind that most people here probably don’t know you can use a planer as a molding machine. I haven’t done this myself since the 80’s and it was only once. There are 13” planer/molders. I’m trying to imagine worse case scenario—- and I don’t see how the knives are going to explode out of the machine or anything. Most likely bad thing would be that you can’t secure the knives well enough and one comes loose and jams the machine while running. I would definitely feed it from the side until you have some experience with it. Been thinking about making my own molding for a project and sure would like to know if this works.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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KeithusMaximus

3 posts in 731 days


#4 posted 05-11-2016 02:35 PM

Hi Rick,

My thread was inspired by those 13” machines as I cant see how they are massively different to a thicknesser. the things I have noted is that the roller is more substantial and the knives screw into the roller directly unlike the thicknesser which is more of a clamp than an actual fitting.

My main concern is that the blade could fly out thus taking the machine or my head out with it. there is also the possibility of it ripping the wood right out of my hand.

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Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#5 posted 05-11-2016 03:21 PM

They are planers (thicknessers). The molding knives are planing the wood to a shape instead of flat. Those machines are heavier duty than yours. A benchtop planer may not have a beefy enough system for clamping knives. Some knives screw directly to the roller, some clamp in place. You are talking about modify a machine for a purpose it’s designers never intended so there is inherent risk involved. It’s interesting. I would love for someone else to do it but I probably wouldn’t because I don’t know that you can secure a knife well enough and I wouldn’t want to damage my planer. You can also make molding on a table saw, or a shaper, might be simpler and safer than modifying a 12” planer.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5734 posts in 2835 days


#6 posted 05-11-2016 04:29 PM

As an alternative, you could set up a number of routers in router tables, each with a specific cut, and run the material through each set up to get the desired moulding. Possibly a greater degree of flexibilty!

Much like Sandra did to make her clothes pins.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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