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Forum topic by mnausa posted 05-11-2016 02:08 AM 443 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mnausa

29 posts in 1242 days


05-11-2016 02:08 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question walnut joining modern

I am curious on what way some of you would do this.

Mine will be a little different from the pics.
55” wide and 30” deep
30” to top of desk
It will have a keyboard drawer in the center and a drawer on both sides of the keyboard.
The stained wood will be walnut and the rest will be white lacquer.

Since I’m not able to put an apron on the front because of the 3 drawers, I believe over time that it will start sagging in the front because of books and stuff. I plan on putting an apron on the back.

I don’t think that the approx 1.75” x 1.75” walnut band on the front would be enough support long term. I have a couple of ideas but wanted to see what you thought.

-- Mike, Mississippi, www.facebook.com/pages/Wood-b-Perfect/169836013081912


7 replies so far

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

818 posts in 383 days


#1 posted 05-11-2016 02:58 AM

mnausa,

Several ideas are:

Make the top as thick as possible. If laminating several layers to achieve a thicker top, bonding the layers together would increase the strength of the top.

Add a second lower rail that is below the drawers and which is attached to the top rail with drawer dividers. The lower rail and the two drawer dividers could all be 1-3/4” x 1-3/4”. This option makes mounting the drawer runners or glides a little easier.

Increase the width of the front rail from 1-3/4” high X 1-3/4” wide to 1-3/4” high to 3” (or more) wide.

Install angle iron to the back side of the front walnut rail.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 905 days


#2 posted 05-11-2016 04:31 AM

mnausa—

When I first looked at your desk idea, I thought “That looks weak. It will sag.”

Then I realized that I’m sitting at a similar desk, built of just four pieces of 1” thick particle board, covered in plastic laminate, dimensioned as shown in the drawing below.

I’ve been using this desk since 1984—it was a “disposable” desk used by the IOC staff for the 1984 Olympic games in L.A.—- not sagging yet! (32 years and counting!!)

I like JBrow’s ideas. You might also consider a stretcher/apron about 22” back from the front edge—-behind the drawers—in addition to the rear apron. Laminate the top to 1 1/2” thick or so, and you could get 32 years or more out of it.

—-Jerry

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#3 posted 05-11-2016 12:07 PM

Any material with laminate on both sides will be very resistant to sagging. You could start with a core of double laminatd 3/4” MDF or similar and laminate plywood over that (can’t glue dimensional lumber to a substrate this wide).

Be sure you use the horizontal (thicker) laminate.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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mnausa

29 posts in 1242 days


#4 posted 05-11-2016 12:17 PM

Great ideas! I don’t have a lot of experience with white lacquer. Would that be durable enough for the top. And if so, would MDF or a good quality piece of plywood be better for the top.

-- Mike, Mississippi, www.facebook.com/pages/Wood-b-Perfect/169836013081912

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7913 posts in 1843 days


#5 posted 05-11-2016 02:56 PM

It’s a box on legs, make it a partial torsion box and never worry. You can add as many ribs inside as you want, they won’t need to be heavy, the top won’t need to be thick, and it will never sag.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5729 posts in 2831 days


#6 posted 05-11-2016 04:44 PM

If you ddcide on MDF I would band it with hardwood to protect the edges and corners.

As an alternative, how about a solid counter top material such as PaperStone which is made from recycled paper. It is durable, easy to cut, and is available in different thicknesses and different colors. I have used it and really love it. You can also overlay the MDF with thus material.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#7 posted 05-11-2016 05:22 PM



Great ideas! I don t have a lot of experience with white lacquer. Would that be durable enough for the top. And if so, would MDF or a good quality piece of plywood be better for the top.

- mnausa

I would use 3/4 MDf with hardwood plywood on top and edge band.

After sealing/staining/finishing with whatever you like, I really like covering a desk with a sheet of glass.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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