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Forum topic by JetDriver posted 05-10-2016 03:23 PM 746 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JetDriver

21 posts in 560 days


05-10-2016 03:23 PM

So I’ve been making some DIY upgrades in the back yard over the last year and one of them about 6 months back was installing a small retaining wall of pressure treated 4×4’s. I bought a 5/8” auger bit that is 17.5” long over all to drill the holes for the spike that would connect and anchor the wall into the ground. I found drilling the first hole totally killed the battery on my old dewalt 14.4v drill so I walked across the street and borrowed a corded hammer drill (an old black and decker) from a neighbor.

The drill also really struggled to drill the holes and actually started smoking a couple of times as a result of the bit binding up.

Now to the heart of the story. My wife asks be to build some steps up to an upper area in our yard and having decided on pressure treated 6×6s I knew I would need a serious drill to bore the holes. I ended up purchasing a Bosch HD19-2 that was factory refurbished from CPO tools. The manual suggested high speed/low torque for wood and that is what I started with and once again the drill was really struggling. So I switched to low speed/high torque and now it was capable of fully burying all 17.5 inches of bit into the wood. The only problem was when I switched into reverse to back the bit out what happened instead was that the drill backed right off the chuck leaving it still attached to the wood. CPO was awesome and immediately sent me a replacement drill and shipping label to return the bad unit at no cost.

Drill number two and I start drilling its very first hole. I’m being much more cautious now and don’t run the bit in full depth before trying to back it out and the very first time I go into reverse it once again backs right off the chuck. I should mention that my old dewalt was able to back the bit out after a little help without ever spitting its chuck.

I finished my project using a combination of the two drills (Bosch in forward Dewalt in reverse) and once again CPO is sending me a replacement drill. I talked to Bosch tech support and the guy told me that the auger bit I was using was the problem and that unless I could drive it all the way through it was the wrong bit for the job. He suggested that what I needed was a their 11250VSR Rotary Hammer.

The more I think about it the more I’m thinking there is something off here. A drill should not make more torque in reverse than its capable of taking without having it come apart. And never in my life have I seen or had this happen before. So my question is… is the Bosch guy right? Should Auger bits only be used where you can drive all the way through? Or am I right and there is something night right with these drills?


26 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3666 posts in 1181 days


#1 posted 05-10-2016 03:29 PM

You need a Milwaukee hole hawg model 1670-1. It will last multiple generations if taken care of. It has broken arms and wrists in the past so be careful with it if you do get one.

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2532 posts in 1436 days


#2 posted 05-10-2016 03:40 PM

I agree with Yeti. ^

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2704 days


#3 posted 05-11-2016 04:43 PM

I’ve used a Milwaukee hole hawg and it has so much torque, it can knock you off your feet if you don’t brace yourself.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2704 days


#4 posted 05-11-2016 04:43 PM

I’ve used a Milwaukee hole hawg and it has so much torque, it can knock you off your feet if you don’t brace yourself.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2704 days


#5 posted 05-11-2016 04:46 PM

I’ve used a Milwaukee hole hawg and it has so much torque, it can knock you off your feet if you don’t brace yourself.


I ve used a Milwaukee hole hawg and it has so much torque, it can knock you off your feet if you don t brace yourself.

- MrRon


I don’t know why, but when I hit the “post this reply” button, It gets posted twice.

View jonmakesthings's profile

jonmakesthings

68 posts in 279 days


#6 posted 05-11-2016 05:19 PM

Thats really strange, a quality drill shouldn’t fall apart when you reverse it, and I don’t see any reason why reversing an auger would be that difficult for it.
+1 on the milwaukee hole hawg. Even my 18v milwaukee hammer drill can handle some pretty sizeable augers without too much difficulty

-- How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?

View JetDriver's profile

JetDriver

21 posts in 560 days


#7 posted 05-11-2016 06:16 PM

The Milwaukee would certainly do the job but my question is more about the Bosch. Should it be able in reverse to back the chuck off the drill or not?

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 979 days


#8 posted 05-11-2016 06:19 PM

You should be able to rent a hole hawg. Check hd tool rental. Refurb price is around $300.

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

1911 posts in 1216 days


#9 posted 05-11-2016 06:34 PM

Maybe I’m missing something, but my 18v Bosch drill will handle the auger, and it doesn’t lose its chuck when I reverse it. Admittedly, I haven’t drilled that deep into pressure treated wood, but still, losing the chuck just doesn’t seem right.

I have also used the Hole Hog and, yes, it’s a beast.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View jbay's profile

jbay

811 posts in 360 days


#10 posted 05-11-2016 08:14 PM

You should clean out the drill bit every couple of inches.
I don’t reverse the bit to back it out. I drill a couple of inches and while the drill is still spinning I back it out to let the chips clear then I drill a couple more inches and repeat.
(yes I know the auger bits have a threaded tip, just man handle it to cut loose.)

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View jonmakesthings's profile

jonmakesthings

68 posts in 279 days


#11 posted 05-11-2016 08:18 PM



The Milwaukee would certainly do the job but my question is more about the Bosch. Should it be able in reverse to back the chuck off the drill or not?

- JetDriver

No, it shouldn’t. Maybe it has something to do with them being refurbished. I don’t trust refurbished products anywhere near as much as brand new, something always seems to be wrong

-- How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?

View Lee's profile

Lee

49 posts in 339 days


#12 posted 05-11-2016 10:22 PM

If I understand you right the drill is unscrewing from the chuck and leaving the chuck still attached to the bit. if the chuck has right hand threads, then reversing the motor will try to unscrew it, you might try some thread locker on the chuck. Let it dry overnight, if you ever need to change the chuck you might have a problem getting it off though.

-- Colombia Custom woodworking

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#13 posted 05-11-2016 11:40 PM

#1 PT lumber is wet and IMHO doesn’t care to drilled. #2 Augur bits (like the typical Irwins) are “aggressive” and in my experience will feed themselves thru the hole whether you like it or not…no such thing as backing them out until the hole is finished…combine that with the moisture in the wood (that tends to close up on the bit) and you’ll learn why PT lumber is so much fun. Might be best to use a spade bit and back it out every 1/2” or so. Spade bits usually have a point so when you get close you can finish with your auger. As for the Milwaukee “Hole Hawg”...knew a guy that broke his nose with one of those! A few years ago I found one of their old right angle drills (same body as their Sawzall with a different head)...have to be careful with that thing too!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1110 posts in 2405 days


#14 posted 05-12-2016 12:32 AM

I have a couple Bosch drills, an angle finder, a couple routers, a minter and a site table saw. I’ve been happy with them, though I did give the worst Amazon review to a Bosch quarter sheet sander I could.

I also have Milwaukee drills and grinders and a PC variable speed drill. The Milwaukee’s and the PC beat the Bosch, in their general category. I have no problem stopping the D handle Bosch, when hammering through rock. It’s higher speed costs torque. The Milwakees, though smaller, will do your wrist or whatever damage, as others noted (my finger is still won’t straighten, after all these years.

My PC is about in the category of the Milwakee Hole Hog and would get the job done. Either way, use the extra handle provided.

I think my smaller, low speed Milwakees would do what you need.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 947 days


#15 posted 05-12-2016 12:45 AM



You should clean out the drill bit every couple of inches.
I don t reverse the bit to back it out. I drill a couple of inches and while the drill is still spinning I back it out to let the chips clear then I drill a couple more inches and repeat.
(yes I know the auger bits have a threaded tip, just man handle it to cut loose.)

- jbay

Yes yes yes yes yes

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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