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Forum topic by Beginningwoodworker posted 04-01-2010 04:57 AM 1246 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


04-01-2010 04:57 AM

Topic tags/keywords: pine joining

I some sucess today with my benchtop mortiser, but not so good sucess with my tenoning jig. My tenons seems to be taper, I wonder why?


34 replies so far

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patron

13535 posts in 2801 days


#1 posted 04-01-2010 05:09 AM

charles ,
i always do the ends of the mortises first ,
that way the bit is going down straight ,
then eat a little at a time in the middle ,
moving it sideways .
the bit can flex , and why eat to much
at a time , it just messes with the tool .

as far as your tenons ,
looks like something isn’t square .
check your fence or the router for square .

i always make my mortises a little deeper than the tenons too ,
for a reservoir for the glue .

but hey , you are cooking now !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


#2 posted 04-01-2010 05:13 AM

I am using a tenoning jig on my Unisaw.

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patron

13535 posts in 2801 days


#3 posted 04-01-2010 05:19 AM

check it or the blade for square .
probably the blade is off just a tad .

maybe some sawdust in the closing to 90 deg .
it gets in mine too ,
i clean it out before i come to 90 .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


#4 posted 04-01-2010 05:20 AM

Ok I will check it.

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jm82435

1284 posts in 3202 days


#5 posted 04-01-2010 05:22 AM

I would suspect the blade is not at 90 degrees, or the jig is not holding your stock at 90 degrees…

-- A thing of beauty is a joy forever...

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jm82435

1284 posts in 3202 days


#6 posted 04-01-2010 05:23 AM

wow I need to type faster, you two had a conversation while I was writing.

-- A thing of beauty is a joy forever...

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dbhost

5604 posts in 2692 days


#7 posted 04-01-2010 05:54 AM

What they said…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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tomb

2 posts in 2438 days


#8 posted 04-01-2010 06:07 AM

Just joined tonight. Been woodworking for a while but have been staying away from mortise and tenons and Dadoes. I am 68 years old, and need to get on the ball. I hope to learn from your experience. Thanks so munch in advance for any help.

-- Tomb. West Virginia

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jack1

2057 posts in 3487 days


#9 posted 04-01-2010 06:08 AM

Is it a home made jig for the tenons? If not, you’ll be able to adjust that too if it’s a Delta or like that.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


#10 posted 04-01-2010 06:13 AM

Its a Delta.

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jack1

2057 posts in 3487 days


#11 posted 04-01-2010 06:19 AM

Which one, there are two. A big heavy grey one and a lighter one (about $30 diff) green maybe? Anyways, use a good fixed square and check everything for 90° to the table and that includes the blade. Take your time and check twice (read my motto ;o)...).

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


#12 posted 04-01-2010 06:25 AM

Tomb, Welcome! I got the 34-183, Jack.

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patron

13535 posts in 2801 days


#13 posted 04-01-2010 06:27 AM

charles ,
i do all my tenons with the dado blades ,
piece flat on the saw table ,
pushing down evenly , as the saw wants to ’ lift ’ the part slightly ,
and use a miter slider to push the part through the blades ,
with a backup screwed to the miter gauge for chip out .
with the fence set for the length of the tenon from the outside of the dado blades ,
and move the piece over until i get the whole thing done ,
then flip the part over and do the other side the same .
i ’ sneak up ’ on the thickness of the tenon ,
by raising the saw a little at a time ,
until it is good .
i found that using the jig you have ,
can let the blade ’ bend ’ in the long end grain cuts ,
and getting a ’ tapered ’ cut like you got .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3133 days


#14 posted 04-01-2010 06:35 AM

I have wobble dado blade would that work?

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hazbro

109 posts in 2450 days


#15 posted 04-01-2010 06:38 AM

Charles, I don’t want do discourage you or demean you; but an english language jig would help you out a lot. My grammar is not perfect, I am a carpenter after all, but I’ve made it to job super without a degree. A little effort in the grammar and spelling can take your ground level know how and field skills to a professional level. If you can hone your skills and practice communication you can go far. Communication skills can take you farther than your woodworking skills.

just trying to help you out. you can go far.

-- measure once, keep cuttin' til it fits

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