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Chicken Coop - sealing the roof of the nesting box

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Forum topic by mortalwombat posted 05-06-2016 03:01 PM 665 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mortalwombat

65 posts in 1610 days


05-06-2016 03:01 PM

I am in the beginning phase of designing a chicken coop that I will build for a bunch of chickens that my wife just bought. There are a bunch of chicks in my garage as we speak, so I had better get moving!

I have most of the design in my head at this point and have begun working it out on paper. However, there is one part that I’m stuck on. I plan to build some nesting boxes to the exterior of the coop with a lid that lifts for access to the eggs. It’s a pretty common layout like you see here: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/133650

In all the designs I have found, there is either nothing to keep water out of the hinge joint, or poorly designed attempts at it. We live in an area that can have some pretty rough winters, so it’s not inconceivable for snow to drift up on top of the nesting box that would sit and slowly drip water over the seam.

I will either be using asphalt shingles or corrugated metal roofing – whatever is easiest – to cover the roof of the coop and the nesting box. What might be a good way to keep water out of that hinge joint?


11 replies so far

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ChrisK

1809 posts in 2544 days


#1 posted 05-06-2016 06:11 PM

Could you design a simple gutter system inside the coup so any water that seeped in would have a place to go?

-- Chris K

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Aj2

689 posts in 1261 days


#2 posted 05-06-2016 06:31 PM

Okay so check this out I’m a retired roofer.One detail you might consider is above he hinge joint you fasten metal called z- bar.Then you will get a piece of roof to wall metal.Then you can slide the roof to wall metal in and out as needed.
I think they might still the flashings in the roofing section at the Borg.If you need more description let me know.
Good luck looks like a fun project.

View mortalwombat's profile

mortalwombat

65 posts in 1610 days


#3 posted 05-06-2016 08:39 PM



Okay so check this out I m a retired roofer.One detail you might consider is above he hinge joint you fasten metal called z- bar.Then you will get a piece of roof to wall metal.Then you can slide the roof to wall metal in and out as needed.
I think they might still the flashings in the roofing section at the Borg.If you need more description let me know.
Good luck looks like a fun project.

- Aj2

Thanks AJ2!
I looked up z-bar and have some ideas how it might be used in an application like this, but a little clarification would help. With the method you are describing, would you have to slide the roof to wall metal in and out every time you lift the roof, or are you saying it would slide in and out on it’s own as you open and close the door? Maybe a picture would help if that’s not too hard.

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Aj2

689 posts in 1261 days


#4 posted 05-06-2016 11:22 PM

So here’s what I was thinking .In the drawing they call metal flashing that what I was calling roof to wall it’s usually bent at 110 degree angle for the slope of the roof.
You should be able to slide it in and out of the zbar easy peasy.
Hope this helps.

Aj

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xeddog

115 posts in 2470 days


#5 posted 05-08-2016 05:03 PM

I built a couple of coops for my daughter-in-law and had the same dilema. I didn’t spend much time thinking about sealing the doors because “Theys only chickens and a few drops of water ain’t gonna hurt ‘em”.

Wayne

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rwe2156

2192 posts in 944 days


#6 posted 05-08-2016 07:16 PM

I just extended the roof line far enough to cover the boxes.

As long as the cover is sloped so water can run off, it should be alright.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Aj2

689 posts in 1261 days


#7 posted 05-08-2016 08:21 PM

Here’s what I was thinking,the other comments sound good to me.
Detail on the right.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3040 days


#8 posted 05-08-2016 08:32 PM

Seems to me what the old timers used worked fine,a piece of intertube nailed to the wall and door with a little henry’s roof patch underneath .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View mortalwombat's profile

mortalwombat

65 posts in 1610 days


#9 posted 05-09-2016 02:18 PM


I built a couple of coops for my daughter-in-law and had the same dilema. I didn t spend much time thinking about sealing the doors because “Theys only chickens and a few drops of water ain t gonna hurt em”.
I was initially thinking the same thing, but then I realized these are the nesting boxes. They are smaller enclosed spaces with bedding and what not. I worry that once they get wet, they won’t dry well and they will get pretty gross. I don’t want my eggs in that, and I don’t really want my chickens in it either. I’m not going to worry about the door seal so much, though. If water does work itself in there, it won’t be much and it will dry out quickly enough and get cleaned regularly.

I think I’ve got my plan. I may go with the flashing that AJ2 is talking about, but the old inner tube idea makes perfect sense as well. Thanks for the input!

View chiseler's profile

chiseler

121 posts in 351 days


#10 posted 05-11-2016 02:46 AM



Seems to me what the old timers used worked fine,a piece of intertube nailed to the wall and door with a little henry s roof patch underneath .

- a1Jim


My thought exactly

-- Scott.Triangle,NY Becareful and don't forget...They cut meat too!

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firefighterontheside

13467 posts in 1319 days


#11 posted 05-11-2016 02:52 AM

My nest boxes are built into the coop with a little drop down door that gives access to the boxes, so different than your plan. I built a little awning over the door so I don’t stand in the rain while I’m collecting eggs.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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