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Craftsman 113.27520 Arbor Shaft & Bearing Removal.

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Forum topic by ecaps posted 1604 days ago 6708 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ecaps

7 posts in 1604 days


1604 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman table saw 11327520 10 old

Hi guys (and gals),

I figure it’s finally time to get my tools back in shape. Seems like everytime I go to use them, I have to jury rig or deal with adjusting/fixing something before I begin to make some saw dust. Anways, I need some help/tips on getting replacing arbor bearings on my old craftsman saw. I was finishing up my daughter’s bedroom when I burned through 2 belts, so I figure I’ll fix this saw & then work on my old Atlas DP.

So I got the saw all apart, but cannot get the arbor shaft removed so I can access the bearings. I have removed the bearing reatainer plate (p/n 3508) and the c clip (p/n6383). It seems I should be able to slide or somehow persuade it out. It seems to be siezed on there and I didn’t want to bang on it for fear of breaking something. So any on have some pointers or am I over looking something?

113.27520 Parts Breakdown

-- Look forward. Turn what has been done into a better path. If you’re a leader, think about the impact of your decisions on seven generations into the future.


16 replies so far

View Michael Murphy's profile

Michael Murphy

448 posts in 1631 days


#1 posted 1604 days ago

The belts you replaced were due to the bearings being bad? If thats the case, and you have all the retainers out of the way, then the arbor and bearings may be stuck because of excessive heat generated by the bad bearings.

Is the housing steel, iron, or is it aluminum? In any case I would try heating up the housing with a heat gun or even a propane torch while trying to not heat up the arbor and bearings. Then tap on it a bit in the right direction using a mallet and a piece of wood.

-- Michael Murphy, Woodland, CA.

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ecaps

7 posts in 1604 days


#2 posted 1604 days ago

I’m not exactly sure, the belts kept turning on themselves almost like a pulley out of alignment. I started checking on things and noticed the bearings where bad. Turning the arbor by hand you could feel it catch and has resistance.

I’m not sure what the housing is made from, definately not aluminum. I just didn’t want to break something, since parts aren’t exactly easy to come by. I’ve rebuilt truck axles, drill press arbors, etc so I’m not a novice to taking things apart, but if I break something on my truck they were only 2 bazillion made so I can just run to junkyard/parts store & get a replacement.

As as side note, I broke the knob on the handwheel getting it off. I’m not exactly sure how that happened, but it looked as though that handwheel had someone else working on it at one time or another. So I’m a little gun shy to start using a drift punch to free the arbor shaft….

-- Look forward. Turn what has been done into a better path. If you’re a leader, think about the impact of your decisions on seven generations into the future.

View UnionLabel's profile

UnionLabel

660 posts in 1826 days


#3 posted 1604 days ago

I have a similar saw, see my project page. You are right when you say the arbor should just slide out. The bearing on the other side is a different matter. If you have the arbor housing out, you should be able to get the arbor out. Support the other side and like you were thinking, use a drift punch ans a dead blow hammer to persuade it out. There is an inner C-clip up against the inner bearing race (p/n#6383), make sure you have that removed.

The other side of the arbor has a pin running through the shaft. Took it to a machine shop and had them remove and replace the bearing.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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UnionLabel

660 posts in 1826 days


#4 posted 1604 days ago

Also, if you are in need of any parts for your table-saw you can go to here, http://www.owwm.com/

Just sign up and post your request with model # in the shop forum. I see the site has changed so you may get redirected. I have gotten a few parts for my 27520 from them. Good source for old machinery parts.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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ecaps

7 posts in 1604 days


#5 posted 1604 days ago

@ UnionLabel, so which side should the arbor shaft slide out toward? – I’m assuming the side that where the blade screws on?
I do have the c clip out (p/n 6383) that would definately stop it from moving. It was getting late and I was getting tired last night when I got to that point.

BTW, I like the handwheel’s on your saw. Are those original or replacements. Since I broken the “knob” off one of my handwheels I’m looking for some replacement(s). Sears has replacements for about $26.00, but I fear they will be plastic and I’d rather have metal.

One other thing anyone know what bearing type is used. I’ve got to get 2 new bearings for my drill press that is in pieces too. I have to much broken down equipment at the present time.

-- Look forward. Turn what has been done into a better path. If you’re a leader, think about the impact of your decisions on seven generations into the future.

View UnionLabel's profile

UnionLabel

660 posts in 1826 days


#6 posted 1604 days ago

The shaft slides out toward the arbor nut, so you can beat on the pulley side.

The hand wheels are from Grizzly Industrial

I have a set of bearings down in the shop. They are fairly common and sell I think for 12-15 bucks for OTC bearings. I’ll look up the number and get the number in a dew minutes. I just have to remember where I stashed them.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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UnionLabel

660 posts in 1826 days


#7 posted 1604 days ago

Ok, I ordered my replacement bearings from Sears, part # 3509, they show only one left, but if you take it to a bearing supplier, I know that they can match it up.

Oh yea, the pin is through the washer collar on the blade side.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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UnionLabel

660 posts in 1826 days


#8 posted 1604 days ago

If you go to http://www.timken.com/en-us/products/bearings/productlist/ball/Pages/default.aspx

Find a industrial distributor near you, take an old one with you, I bet you will find the bearings.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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ecaps

7 posts in 1604 days


#9 posted 1604 days ago

OK, I got the arbor shaft out & the bearings off. My washer collar didn’t have a pin through it, it was just a press fit. I was able to get it off (and the bearing) with a 2-jawed puller.

The bearings were really shot, I could see where one loss lubrication. Anyways, the bearings were Norma XF 121PP. I’m going to probably go to fastenal and get new bearings. I couldn’t find a quick cross-reference for norma bearings on the net. My Atlas DP had fafnir bearings and I was easily able to find cross-reference.

Thanks for the help so far and I’ll keep everyone updated. It maybe slow though, since I have a bunch of irons in the fire right now so to speak….

-- Look forward. Turn what has been done into a better path. If you’re a leader, think about the impact of your decisions on seven generations into the future.

View UnionLabel's profile

UnionLabel

660 posts in 1826 days


#10 posted 1603 days ago

Glad Everything worked out. I love my 27520. Just finished a new rolling table for it. Face frame and doors next. Also an outfeed table and a right side extension table. Good luck and I look forward to seeing more on the saw as it progresses. By the way, machined pulleys and a link belt will also make a big difference in performance. These guys are great for link belt, http://www.agrisales-inc.com/item_list.php?int_category_id=50

Hard to beat 5.15 a foot.

Order your pulleys here, http://www.in-lineindustries.com/performance_pack.html

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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ecaps

7 posts in 1604 days


#11 posted 1599 days ago

Well, I got the saw all taken apart, cleaned & picked up new bearings. I went to put the new bearings on last evening, but they didn’t fit. Looks like I’m going to have to purchase them from Sears at roughly 8x the cost.

Of the information I found online, the cross reference was a 6202 bearing, but the bore is a fraction to small. I even had the arbor assembly in the freezer overnight, but no dice.

-- Look forward. Turn what has been done into a better path. If you’re a leader, think about the impact of your decisions on seven generations into the future.

View jerryz's profile

jerryz

164 posts in 1905 days


#12 posted 1599 days ago

You can purchase some very nice replacement handle weels from Grizzly they have very good prices.
You will need to drill the center hole to your shaft as they sell them undersized so that they can be installed in any machinery.
I bought a set to replace the aluminum handles that came with my Sears 22124 hybrid saw.
This is the page for the wheels: http://www.grizzly.com/products/category.aspx?key=240470

And this is the model I bought for my saw:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/Spoked-Handwheel-6-/H3191
Also I ordered this Crank Handle:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/Safety-Handle-2-3-4-H3185-H3191-/H5133

They cost me $18.90×2 for the 2 wheels, they look really nice on my table saw also because they are heavier than the stock ones when you turn them the feeling you have is definitevily better..

View UnionLabel's profile

UnionLabel

660 posts in 1826 days


#13 posted 1599 days ago

Take the arbor with you to the bearing shop. Sometimes, they can mike the shaft and come up with the right size bearing. On the other side, Make sure the bearings fit in the arbor housing. You have to remember that you have 2 clearance issues.

The third thing maybe that the journal on the arbor could be slightly out of round. A machine shop can check it and maybe polish the journal enough to get the bearing to fit.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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ecaps

7 posts in 1604 days


#14 posted 1598 days ago

jerryz, thanks for the additional information on handles.

What does that mean to “mike” the shaft? I’ve heard that term before, but I’m still trying to get machining vocab. It will probably cost me as much to get that looked at as it would to get 2 new bearings. In the scheme of things $30 isn’t much, just irritates me that bearings (from sears) are that much.

The bearings fit snug in the arbor, they’re just a tad bit small to fit on the arbor shaft. I guess the arbor shaft is 5/8” (.625) and the bore on the replacement 6202 bearings that are supposed to be replacement are 15mm (.590). So I’m not sure how other got those to fit without using a reamer on the bearing.

-- Look forward. Turn what has been done into a better path. If you’re a leader, think about the impact of your decisions on seven generations into the future.

View Michael Murphy's profile

Michael Murphy

448 posts in 1631 days


#15 posted 1598 days ago

“Mike” is slang for using a Micrometer, dial or digital to get the exact size of the bore or shaft.

-- Michael Murphy, Woodland, CA.

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