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Forum topic by builtinbkyn posted 05-05-2016 07:00 PM 621 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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builtinbkyn

651 posts in 408 days


05-05-2016 07:00 PM

So today I set out to make a bandsaw box for my mother for Mother’s Day. I think it would be something she will like.

Well the issue I’m having I haven’t encountered in my limited use of this bandsaw, which was a CL purchase. To fill in some blanks – the bandsaw is a Grizzly 550. It has Carter guides and a riser block. I have Lonnie Bird’s book and have followed the procedures outline, but my issue persists so I’m here looking for some insight.

OK on to the issue. I needed to install a narrower blade for tighter radius curves so I put a Timber Wolf 1/8” x 14tpi blade. It’s new. The blade doesn’t track well on the tires when no cut is being performed. I realize the blade doesn’t need to track in the center of the tire, but the teeth do need to be supported somewhere around the crown of the top tire. Turning the tracking knob is very fussy and the blade wanders too far in either direction with little adjustment. I’ve cleaned the tires, thinking maybe there was some pitch buildup causing this to happen. I backed off the guides and reset them. Nothing so far has mitigated what’s happening. Is this a sign of worn tires? Is there something else I should check? Is this a sign of over tensioning/under tensioning the blade?

Just sitting here scratching my head :(

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)


17 replies so far

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#1 posted 05-05-2016 07:06 PM

This can sometimes happen when you put too much/too little tension on the blade. You should track the blade with very little tension on it, just enough so that it rotates around the tires, maybe a little more. Keep upping the tension little by little and adjust the tracking as you go. Keep in mind the 1/8 inch blades need very little tension to operate.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#2 posted 05-05-2016 07:11 PM

Another tip specifically for when you use 1/8 inch blades, you can set the upper guides about 2 inches above the work! It helps the blades last longer. I read it in Duginske’s bandsaw book, it actually works!

EDIT: Forgot, you have the Carter guides, not regular ones. :)

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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builtinbkyn

651 posts in 408 days


#3 posted 05-05-2016 07:24 PM

Well thanks Brandon. I’ll go back and reset everything and try a lower tension to see if that corrects the issue. Still wondering about the tires. May just replace them anyway. Not sure how old they are and they’re certainly inexpensive enough.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#4 posted 05-05-2016 09:03 PM



Well thanks Brandon. I ll go back and reset everything and try a lower tension to see if that corrects the issue. Still wondering about the tires. May just replace them anyway. Not sure how old they are and they re certainly inexpensive enough.

- builtinbkyn

I dont think the tires would be a problem, the urethane ones last quite awhile! I have original urethane tires that are 17 years old on my Delta 14 in, and they work just fine. Usually between $30-$40 for a decent new pair. I would spin the wheel freehand with no blade and check for any wobble, laterall or axial, which can happen if the tires arent a consistent thickness around.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#5 posted 05-05-2016 09:10 PM

Carter guides don’t play well with small blades. If you want to do tight curves, get a stabilizer!

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Or make your own… they aren’t all that complicated :)

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2390 days


#6 posted 05-05-2016 09:46 PM

I have given up on 1/8” blades for my Grizzly. Similar problem that you are having. I now use 3/16” blades to make band saw boxes.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1019 posts in 1397 days


#7 posted 05-05-2016 10:06 PM



Carter guides don t play well with small blades. If you want to do tight curves, get a stabilizer!

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Or make your own… they aren t all that complicated :)

- MrUnix

I’ve thought about this. Has anybody here made their own stabilizer? I looked (mostly on Amazon and Ebay) for a slotted bearing, and while I did find some I never found one that I thought would really do the trick. Bueller, Bueller, ......anybody…..................?


-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#8 posted 05-05-2016 10:16 PM



Carter guides don t play well with small blades. If you want to do tight curves, get a stabilizer!

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Or make your own… they aren t all that complicated :)

- MrUnix

Pretty sure he has the stabilizer, if i remeber correctly from when i visited

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

693 posts in 1266 days


#9 posted 05-05-2016 10:52 PM

I think it’s a bad weld on the blade.Take the tension off the blade and hold a straight edge against the back see if it’s straight.
That’s my guess from a thousand miles away.

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builtinbkyn

651 posts in 408 days


#10 posted 05-05-2016 11:06 PM

Thanks everyone for the responses. This was the first time using the narrow blade. I don’t have this issue with wider blades. I guess it was a combination of over tensioning and just finding the sweet spot in the adjustment, and yes, I have the Carter stabilizer for small blades. That works pretty well.

I got the drawer cut out just fine. Just had to take it very slow. I did however discover that the Ridgid combination spindle/belt sander isn’t tall enough to sand the profile of my box LOL I had to do it by hand, using a combination of methods. The spindles worked just fine …..................... manually :) I also use a rasp and rat tail file.

Here’s the results so far.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#11 posted 05-05-2016 11:23 PM

You can actually use sanding sleeves that are taller than the standard 4 inch ones. The part that would extend upward is stiff enough to work without the rubber drum backing it.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 408 days


#12 posted 05-05-2016 11:37 PM



You can actually use sanding sleeves that are taller than the standard 4 inch ones. The part that would extend upward is stiff enough to work without the rubber drum backing it.

- TheWoodRaccoon


How do you fasten it to the post? The sleeve has a rubber liner that compresses with a nut to hold the sleeve from spinning freely.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#13 posted 05-05-2016 11:58 PM


You can actually use sanding sleeves that are taller than the standard 4 inch ones. The part that would extend upward is stiff enough to work without the rubber drum backing it.

- TheWoodRaccoon

How do you fasten it to the post? The sleeve has a rubber liner that compresses with a nut to hold the sleeve from spinning freely.

- builtinbkyn


A deep set socket comes to mind.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 397 days


#14 posted 05-06-2016 01:12 AM


You can actually use sanding sleeves that are taller than the standard 4 inch ones. The part that would extend upward is stiff enough to work without the rubber drum backing it.

- TheWoodRaccoon

How do you fasten it to the post? The sleeve has a rubber liner that compresses with a nut to hold the sleeve from spinning freely.

- builtinbkyn

You can use some long nose pliers to reach down inside the sleeve and tighten the nut. You can buy longer sleeves, just make sure they are the same daimeter.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View konnon6's profile

konnon6

34 posts in 1781 days


#15 posted 05-06-2016 01:41 AM

First problem with and 1/8 inch band saw blade don’t use the lower guide at all- no really!
next check for the wheels being plumb with each other.
Now I use all different sizes but I use rubber hoses cut to 1/2 an inch longer than the sleeve
and put a washer on eather side with a nut on one end and the other a nut and thread.
My biggest was a six inch using a discarded rubber airbag for a semi-truck axel.

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

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