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Forum topic by Woodchuck2010 posted 05-03-2016 03:14 AM 418 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 321 days


05-03-2016 03:14 AM

I’m making a couple of 2×4 tables for my son and daughter in law. This is dry fitted currently. I’m wondering if I should put an arch in the side stretchers also or leave them straight. I will be putting in a bottom shelf also. While I’m at it, I’d like to put a sliding top on one of them too. How can I do that as simply as possible? Thank you.

-- Chuck, Michigan,


10 replies so far

View ROB_IN_MN's profile

ROB_IN_MN

29 posts in 1610 days


#1 posted 05-03-2016 03:45 AM

I would leave the arch out. I think it looks great the way it is.

not sure about the sliding top

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3040 days


#2 posted 05-03-2016 04:23 AM

I like arches on both sides,I’m not really clear what you mean by sliding top?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3675 posts in 1729 days


#3 posted 05-03-2016 04:52 AM

I’m in agreement with Jim on both issues. So far that’s a very nice looking table.

View devann's profile

devann

2200 posts in 2155 days


#4 posted 05-03-2016 05:41 AM

Looks just fine the way you have it.

The only thing I’d change is to round the corners of the table top with a jigsaw a little so they wouldn’t hurt so bad when I bumped into them. And use a roundover router bit on the exposed edges, top, aprons & legs. Something my painter friends talked me into doing for them on some jobs. It gives you a more durable product where the finishes (paint or poly) are concerned.

Like the other comments, not sue what kind of sliding table top you’re wanting to do.

Nice looking table.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7481 posts in 1470 days


#5 posted 05-03-2016 11:37 AM

Sliding top? So you could have storage under it? Why not just hinge the top?

I like the arch you have showing in the bottom stretchers. I would do the same to the top on the narrow sides (but that would mean you couldn’t do the storage under the top)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

818 posts in 383 days


#6 posted 05-03-2016 12:12 PM

Woodchuck2010,

I assume the side stretchers are those running perpendicular to those with the arch. Adding an arch on the side stretchers would “lighten” the look of the table and that is probably what I would do. I made living room side tables, but from 4/4 lumber, with arched upper and lower rails all the way around. Nonetheless, the way shown in the photo looks nice. Unless it is a surprise, the son and daughter-in-law would be the go-to people for this design decision.

Based on the assumption that the sliding top is a feature that would reveal a box for storage (like a fixed drawer) accessed by sliding the top out of the way, a couple of ideas are:

One option is to install a pair of slotted cleats secured to the inside rails. A pair of bolts that are secured to the underside of the top would ride in the slots and capture the top. If the slotted cleats set a little proud of the top edges of the table’s frame, the top would probably slide open a little easier.

Another option is to reduce the width (i.e.height) of one one rail so that runners attached to the top can move with the top as it is opened, allowing the runners to pass over the narrow rail in the provided gap. The gap could be closed up by attaching a filler piece to the top so that it sets flush with the narrow rail, like an inset drawer. In this option metal glides or wood runners could be used. Smooth running metal glides could allow the top to be slid open without the need to clear stuff off the top.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1814 days


#7 posted 05-03-2016 01:48 PM

I would arch the stretchers if it were mine. I have no idea what you mean by sliding top, so I can’t comment on that.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 321 days


#8 posted 05-03-2016 01:49 PM



Looks just fine the way you have it. The only thing I d change is to round the corners of the table top with a jigsaw a little so they wouldn t hurt so bad when I bumped into them. And use a roundover router bit on the exposed edges, top, aprons & legs. Something my painter friends talked me into doing for them on some jobs. It gives you a more durable product where the finishes (paint or poly) are concerned.

Like the other comments, not sue what kind of sliding table top you re wanting to do.

Nice looking table.

- devann

Oh for sure. Just doing a test fit. I should have been more clear. My son said he’d like a compartment that he could get to without removing things from the top. I’ve already done a table with the apron drawer, but he wants the whole top to slide open.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 321 days


#9 posted 05-03-2016 01:50 PM



Woodchuck2010,

I assume the side stretchers are those running perpendicular to those with the arch. Adding an arch on the side stretchers would “lighten” the look of the table and that is probably what I would do. I made living room side tables, but from 4/4 lumber, with arched upper and lower rails all the way around. Nonetheless, the way shown in the photo looks nice. Unless it is a surprise, the son and daughter-in-law would be the go-to people for this design decision.

Based on the assumption that the sliding top is a feature that would reveal a box for storage (like a fixed drawer) accessed by sliding the top out of the way, a couple of ideas are:

One option is to install a pair of slotted cleats secured to the inside rails. A pair of bolts that are secured to the underside of the top would ride in the slots and capture the top. If the slotted cleats set a little proud of the top edges of the table’s frame, the top would probably slide open a little easier.

Another option is to reduce the width (i.e.height) of one one rail so that runners attached to the top can move with the top as it is opened, allowing the runners to pass over the narrow rail in the provided gap. The gap could be closed up by attaching a filler piece to the top so that it sets flush with the narrow rail, like an inset drawer. In this option metal glides or wood runners could be used. Smooth running metal glides could allow the top to be slid open without the need to clear stuff off the top.

- JBrow

Excellent info! Thanks!

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3040 days


#10 posted 05-03-2016 02:02 PM

search sliding table tops in Images there are a number of options there.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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