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My ROS Died

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Forum topic by AandCstyle posted 05-02-2016 06:30 PM 804 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1724 days


05-02-2016 06:30 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

This is more of an electrical question so I will delete it if it isn’t appropriate for this forum.

I was sanding and my 7 year old sander just stopped working. I tested it in another outlet (different circuit) and still no joy. I tried my shop vac in the original outlet and it worked fine. About 2 weeks ago, LOML’s mixer just stopped working. Also, my table saw stopped while I was ripping a 26” long piece of 4/4 walnut.

None of these tools had been over worked so I thought, maybe, I have an electrical issue. I tested several outlets and they were at about 127.5V and 256V. There wasn’t any load on the outlets when I tested them. Could this be the source of my problems? Any other suggestions? Thanks for any guidance.

-- Art


18 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#1 posted 05-02-2016 06:47 PM

It sounds like the ROS is just plain dead. Replacing it may be more cost effective than repairing it.

What about the tablesaw… did it trip a breaker, and then begin working again? Even 4/4 can bind a saw if there is tension in the wood.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View JimYoung's profile

JimYoung

227 posts in 1054 days


#2 posted 05-02-2016 07:16 PM

Looking online, it looks like utility voltage should be +/-5% to +/-10% depending on the location and the power company. You’re voltage is on the high side (greater than +5%), but does not sound outrageous (less than +10%).

I would think that motors would tolerate higher voltages if there is enough cooling. I’ve had problems with electronics (stereo systems, video games, oven) going bad after we had brown outs and power losses due to a storm. I installed a whole house surge protector that appears to have helped. I don’t know if this will help with motors.

It could be just coincidence.

-- -Jim, "Society is well governed when its people obey the magistrates, and the magistrates obey the law." -- Solon

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

424 posts in 592 days


#3 posted 05-02-2016 08:44 PM

I think they just plain die. My PC 1/4 sheet is showing signs…it runs fine for awhile, then “balks”, then runs fine. I hit it with air from the compressor and use the shop vac on it…nothing seems to matter. That tool is probably 20 years old so it owes me nothing (and I have a replacement in the box). My ROS owes my nothing either but PC discontinued that model (344???).

View jonah's profile

jonah

687 posts in 2766 days


#4 posted 05-02-2016 09:05 PM

I think coincidence as well. Nearly all motors should be able to handle the extra current with no problems. If I’m not mistaken, UL certification requires performance with a nominal 125/250V, not 120/240, and you are really close to that. The extra voltage shouldn’t be an issue.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1724 days


#5 posted 05-02-2016 09:41 PM

My thanks to everyone for the responses.

It seems like the consensus is that I am outliving my woodworking tools. I guess this gives me the opportunity to upgrade. ;)

-- Art

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

424 posts in 592 days


#6 posted 05-02-2016 09:57 PM



My thanks to everyone for the responses.

It seems like the consensus is that I am outliving my woodworking tools. I guess this gives me the opportunity to upgrade. ;)

- AandCstyle

Dunno if you will be upgrading…my experience is that the old stuff lasted longer. You didn’t mention brand…I know a lot of people that like the Dewalt Yellow. PC is owned by the same company now but a lot of their tools have been moved to the “bargain” segment. I’ll be needing a new ROS soon and the decision will come down to something that will use my existing stock of disks (5” 8 hole).

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1818 days


#7 posted 05-02-2016 10:23 PM

Mine died and I replaced the switch, now it is back in action.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View CampD's profile

CampD

1475 posts in 2953 days


#8 posted 05-02-2016 10:26 PM

30 yrs using powered hand tools almost every day gives me lots of experience on this subject. First part i check is the plug, than the cord and finally the switch, 99% of the time it’s one of those parts.there cheap and getting more cheaply made by the day. Easy fix.

-- Doug...

View splatman's profile

splatman

563 posts in 866 days


#9 posted 05-02-2016 11:35 PM

Another thing to check are the brushes.
So don’t toss those tools yet!
Brushes are 2 little blocks of graphite that connect the stator to the rotor in almost all universal motors (there are “brushless” universal motors). They’re cheap and easy to replace (though not as easy as cords or switches). eReplacementParts.com my go-to source for tool parts.
My Ridgid TS was off-n-on, then quit altogether. Swapped in new brushes, and it was back in bizz like nothing happened.
Also, if your tool makes unusual buzzing sounds, sparks like crazy where it should only spark a little, and smokes out, that’s a sure sign of bad brushes. My Porter-Cable belt sander had that problem. One brush went bad, so I replaced it, but the other one was not much better. So if a bad brush, replace them both. Once both brushes had been replaced, it ran like new.

I once found a Ryobi angle grinder in a dumpster. Bad cord was the problem. (checked with an ohm meter. No reading = no connection) Swapped in a cord I had stashed away, and I had me a free angle grinder.

View Alongiron's profile

Alongiron

571 posts in 2160 days


#10 posted 05-03-2016 12:07 AM

Art

Looks like it is time to ditch the power tools and go old school! Find a place close to a river for your watermill and quit watching Norm and start watching Roy!! Seriously.. I had my 6” ROS from Ridgid quit working and I found it to be just the switch. I took it in to HD and they fixed it no charge.

-- Measure twice and cut once.....Steve Lien

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

145 posts in 283 days


#11 posted 05-03-2016 03:57 AM

Usually, service voltage sags rather than drifting upward above nominal. When I saw that happening in my shop, I traced it back to an open neutral wire. The power company guy came out and replaced the neutral wire. He said it is normally squirrels who gnaw on the aluminum wire and eventually open it up. He gave me a section of the cable and, sure enough, it looked exactly like it had been gnawed into. To see if you have that problem, use your voltmeter to measure the two hot wires with respect to ground and see if they are very different. That is a dead giveway you have problems with neutral.

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

424 posts in 592 days


#12 posted 05-03-2016 01:52 PM



Another thing to check are the brushes.
So don t toss those tools yet!
Brushes are 2 little blocks of graphite that connect the stator to the rotor in almost all universal motors (there are “brushless” universal motors). They re cheap and easy to replace (though not as easy as cords or switches). eReplacementParts.com my go-to source for tool parts.
My Ridgid TS was off-n-on, then quit altogether. Swapped in new brushes, and it was back in bizz like nothing happened.
Also, if your tool makes unusual buzzing sounds, sparks like crazy where it should only spark a little, and smokes out, that s a sure sign of bad brushes. My Porter-Cable belt sander had that problem. One brush went bad, so I replaced it, but the other one was not much better. So if a bad brush, replace them both. Once both brushes had been replaced, it ran like new.

I once found a Ryobi angle grinder in a dumpster. Bad cord was the problem. (checked with an ohm meter. No reading = no connection) Swapped in a cord I had stashed away, and I had me a free angle grinder.

- splatman

Sadly the cost of repair parts is usually obscene. It’s always a difficult decision for me to repair or replace.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3927 posts in 2710 days


#13 posted 05-03-2016 05:13 PM

I’ve used power tools for over 50 years. Belts could break, mechanical parts could wear out, but I have never had a failure due to over-voltage or bad house wiring. That is why I would discount any problem with the power.

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1918 posts in 1782 days


#14 posted 05-03-2016 08:30 PM

The off on switches are known for just quitting .. A quick test would be to “jumper’ across the switch and give a short try … not the safest thing in the world, but it will let you know if you need a $5 switch or a $50 tool.
I use a “clip lead”, (it’s a wire with a roach clip on either end), clip on to both sides of the switch and plug in for a second.
Using an ohm meter is a lot safer if you know how to use one … and no power applied.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1724 days


#15 posted 05-03-2016 10:50 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions. I feel better that it probably isn’t a house electrical issue. If I find any definitive answers, I will update this thread.

-- Art

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