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Help with Conference table top

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Forum topic by RPG posted 05-01-2016 08:07 PM 734 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RPG

21 posts in 340 days


05-01-2016 08:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question resource oak pine jointer joining traditional modern help suggestion

Hello lumber jock community. I’d love some advise and pics if possible on this. I’ve been asked to build a conference room table for a small company. I’m on a low budget but want to obviously make a quality top. I made the pedestals already but struggling with the top and budget. My thoughts are to either join oak 3/4” 6X8’s together or a sheet of oak ply and join butter board ends. I was going to pocket hole and glue everything together and case it with 1X3 oak. It will have a pretty dark stain. Does anyone have any advise on this? Would this be a good method? My fear is wood movement and it twisting. I’m down in South Texas where we have allot of humidity and heat. Even though it will be in air conditioning I would hate for it to twist. Thank you to anyone’s input. [URL=http://s1126.photobucket.com/user/rpgwoodworking/media/Mobile%20Uploads/BFF6C2DB-BAFD-453D-8990-FD91CD190CE0_zpsclzk1z2l.jpg.html][IMG]http://i1126.photobucket.com/albums/l606/rpgwoodworking/Mobile%20Uploads/BFF6C2DB-BAFD-453D-8990-FD91CD190CE0_zpsclzk1z2l.jpg[/IMG][/URL] http://i1126.photobucket.com/albums/l606/rpgwoodworking/Mobile%20Uploads/BFF6C2DB-BAFD-453D-8990-FD91CD190CE0_zpsclzk1z2l.jpg—Ryan, www.rpgwoodworking.net, rpgwoodworking

-- Ryan, www.rpgwoodworking.net, rpgwoodworking.net


19 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

688 posts in 1260 days


#1 posted 05-01-2016 09:13 PM

The only thing I can think of advising without blindly steering you wrong is to make a thicker top.Id shoot for a full inch or better.
Will the top cup or twist is anyone’s guess.Wood selection and your ability to join boards together with or without a jointer or planer is just a few.
Cool looking base.Good luck.

Aj

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RPG

21 posts in 340 days


#2 posted 05-01-2016 10:45 PM

Thanks AJ. I have a jointer and planer so I’m confident in being able to join everything together well. Just not confident in the best method or design.

-- Ryan, www.rpgwoodworking.net, rpgwoodworking.net

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1430 posts in 3021 days


#3 posted 05-03-2016 01:24 PM

Hey Ryan,

Your base looks nice. I would avoid pocket screws if possible unless you plug them and sand them flush. Solid oak will be expensive and have a ton of movement. In TX, my solid oak dining room table expanded 1/4”. Breadboard ends are traditionally for stabilizing and dealing with a solid top.

You could use a piece of 23/32” oak plywood and wrap it with solid oak with whatever profile you want. That would be the most economical and least troublesome solution. You could even wrap it with 1” thick solid oak to give the top more weight visually, flush with the top of course.

I would probably use biscuits registered off the top surface all the way around. You’ll need several clamps and/or cauls for the glue up. The joint may be tough to make invisible, so you may be better off celebrating the joint with a slight chamfer. The dark stain will hide if you go through the oak veneer.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View RPG's profile

RPG

21 posts in 340 days


#4 posted 05-03-2016 08:03 PM

Thanks for the post! I’m leaning towards oak ply and wrapping it with 1X3. To add a little visual and custome look I was thinking of joining solid oak 1×6 planed down to the ply in a breadboard style just for visual looks. What do you think? Or just the ply wrapped in 1X oak?

-- Ryan, www.rpgwoodworking.net, rpgwoodworking.net

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

688 posts in 1260 days


#5 posted 05-03-2016 10:00 PM

Is a sheet of plywood big enough to make up the table.When you said conference room I’m thinking oh boy that’s gonna be a big one.
And what’s all this talk about pocket screws.I can’t think of a place you would need them.

View RPG's profile

RPG

21 posts in 340 days


#6 posted 05-03-2016 11:10 PM

Lol. It’s going to relatively a small conference table. My bad for not clarifying. Only about 4’x8’. I’m going to join the boards if any with biscuits instead of pocket holes.

-- Ryan, www.rpgwoodworking.net, rpgwoodworking.net

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Aj2

688 posts in 1260 days


#7 posted 05-03-2016 11:18 PM

Ok good a small conference table I feel ya. Sounds fun. I’m glad your not using pocket screws. :)

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1430 posts in 3021 days


#8 posted 05-05-2016 01:19 PM

The breadboard ends on my 3/4” dining table are thicker than the field – 1-1/4”. It’s a nice visual and give it some weight.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

818 posts in 382 days


#9 posted 05-05-2016 02:14 PM

RPG,

I am not clear on the bead board treatment. If the beading is on the surface rather than on the edges, it could make the table difficult to use. The horizontal beading would be a place for dust and dirt to accumulate, but that is minor compared to the annoyance of the uneven top, where papers are shuffled and where people write during note taking. The beading could catch the edges of papers and a pen could drop into the beading groves. Beading the edge would not suffer from these problems. Obviously if the client covers the table with a sheet of protective glass, the top would be protected from ball point pen indentations and it would make the beading on the top surface problem moot.

Another and unusual way to treat the plywood edges with edge banding is to layer the edge banding using two ¾” thick X whatever width. The top layer of the layered edging would run around the perimeter of the plywood. The top layer is attached/made flush with the table top. The second layer of edge banding is attached to the top layer of edge banding but recessed from the edge of the top edge banding by about ¾”, forming a step around the perimeter. If the width of the top and bottom layers of edge banding are the same width or the bottom layer wider, the bottom layer would overlap the bottom surface of the plywood and cover the lower edge banding seam and pocket entry holes and provide additional glue surface for attaching the edge banding. The edges could be left square, but I would probably route a bull nose or a cove on the top layer of edge banding and a quarter-round or cove on the bottom edge of the recessed layer of edging. Since profiling the top surface edge of the edge banding would make it difficult for protective glass covering the top to fit just right, knowing whether protective glass will be used would be good information to have.

In my experience, plywood does not always lay flat. The edge banding will help a lot, especially if layered. Further insurance could be a pair of battens attached to the underside of the plywood and could help keep the plywood flat. If the battens are incorporated into the method for attaching the top to the base, the battens would go unnoticed.

The base is nice work!

View RPG's profile

RPG

21 posts in 340 days


#10 posted 05-05-2016 05:33 PM

JBrown, thanks for sharing. I’m intregued by the double layer of banding you described. Would you happen to have a link or pic of this method so I can get a visual? It will not have a glass top again to mainly save cost. That’s why I was going for a oak top to help with the writing indentations and such vs a softer wood like pine. I was definitely going to structure the underside giving it as much rigidity as possible as well as prevent sag in the ply. Thank you again and I look forward to your reply.

-- Ryan, www.rpgwoodworking.net, rpgwoodworking.net

View RVBoone's profile

RVBoone

10 posts in 215 days


#11 posted 05-05-2016 05:54 PM

This is one I did for my wife wanting a new dining room table. I am a fan of stacked plywood. Just love the look of it. Table is 4/8 piece of 3/4 ply and just started to laying cut plywood end grain up and stepping it. Center is 14 different exotic hard woods tiled in. Around the edge is oak. Can be done on the cheap just very time consuming. Gives is a wow factor on a budget. Top has 268 individual pieces.

View RPG's profile

RPG

21 posts in 340 days


#12 posted 05-05-2016 05:57 PM

Wow indeed! Super creative!

-- Ryan, www.rpgwoodworking.net, rpgwoodworking.net

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

688 posts in 1260 days


#13 posted 05-05-2016 06:04 PM

Very cool table.


This is one I did for my wife wanting a new dining room table. I am a fan of stacked plywood. Just love the look of it. Table is 4/8 piece of 3/4 ply and just started to laying cut plywood end grain up and stepping it. Center is 14 different exotic hard woods tiled in. Around the edge is oak. Can be done on the cheap just very time consuming. Gives is a wow factor on a budget. Top has 268 individual pieces.

- RVBoone


View Drew's profile

Drew

304 posts in 2562 days


#14 posted 05-05-2016 06:47 PM

First, to answer your question, do it right. It’s that simple. Stop looking for the cheapest way to build it because you put yourself in a tight financial spot! You have an obligation to your client to build them the table you discussed with them, for the price you agreed on.

Lets take a step back…

How do you take a job and not even know what you’re going to build? How do you know if you can build it for the agreed price if you don’t even know what it will cost you? Heck, how do you agree on a price?

Back to getting you out of this mess….

If you’re going to use oak plywood (UGH) do NOT go buy a $50 sheet from your local home store. The veneer on that stuff will peal and buckle over time. Spend $100+ and get a nice piece from a quality supplier. Better yet, use 5/4 oak!
I would also suggest staining or painting the base black, simply because you are using a different wood than the top.

-- TruCraftFurniture.com

View RPG's profile

RPG

21 posts in 340 days


#15 posted 05-05-2016 08:54 PM

Drew, thanks for the post. This is for a old friend. Somehow being self taught over the past two years I’ve made allot of furniture that people really thought was great and word of mouth has gone out. So since I’m new and an addicted hobbiest the majority of my builds are one offs I’ve never built. That said my friend has given me allot of leeway on the build and understands my lack of knowledge for price on a build like this. Agreed on the $100+ plywood. I have a supplier who works with me on nice quality ply and hardwoods. (I think he feels like he’s mentoring me on that side!

-- Ryan, www.rpgwoodworking.net, rpgwoodworking.net

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