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Multiple Blades on Table Saw

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Forum topic by Deela40 posted 04-29-2016 03:51 PM 894 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Deela40

92 posts in 2555 days


04-29-2016 03:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

Has anyone ever done multiple blades on a table saw with spacres between the blades? I am not talking about a dado stack, but need to cut three separate grooves as shown on the right:

There is about 5/32” between the grooves. I make and sell clothespins and am currently making three passes to make these grip gorrves. I am looking to cut down on production time, so I was wondering if it was safe to put two blades on my saw with spacers on between.

-- www.heritageclothespins.com


21 replies so far

View Clarkie's profile

Clarkie

380 posts in 1308 days


#1 posted 04-29-2016 04:00 PM

Think about it, have you ever seen it advertised, “You can use 2 or 3 blades at one time on our table saw”. Seriously, I’d say no to the idea, the arbor isn’t designed for that. You may get away with it, but then again you may not, and it’s the “may not” side you don’t want to be on. I almost lost my thumb on a tablesaw a little while back, I can only imagine what may go wrong with trying what you are asking. Be safe, not always necessary to speed up production.

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Deela40

92 posts in 2555 days


#2 posted 04-29-2016 04:12 PM

Thank you Clarkie. I was leaning against doing it, but wanted to verify. I found a good bit about using multiple blades as a dado stack, but could not find any discussion about using two blades that are farther apart.

-- www.heritageclothespins.com

View BenjaminNY's profile

BenjaminNY

55 posts in 869 days


#3 posted 04-29-2016 04:30 PM

They make machines that gang rip/score etc. I would not ad hoc it on a machine not designed for that application. It may work but it’s too risky.

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ClammyBallz

309 posts in 603 days


#4 posted 04-29-2016 05:01 PM

What if you ground down the teeth on two of the chippers and used them as spacers? They would have to be perfectly balanced though.

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2091 days


#5 posted 04-29-2016 05:28 PM

I would try it…...maybe. I think I would be more inclined to use spacers against the fence. Although in a production run you could groove a few boards and have a bunch of clothes pin blanks in no time.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#6 posted 04-29-2016 05:50 PM

(5/32” space x 2) + (1/8” kerf x 3) = .6875”

Most arbors can accept a 13/16” dado stack, so I don’t see why you couldn’t.
Those shallow grooves won’t tax most tablesaws. Some woodworkers use double blades to cut tenons, so his isn’t much different. Fender washers would make ideal spacers (5/8” I.D. for 5/8” arbor).

I would use the two outer blades of a dado stack, and one chipper in the middle.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3927 posts in 2710 days


#7 posted 04-29-2016 06:23 PM

The only thing I can see that could be a problem is; a change in blade spacing through vibration which might cause the work to bind resulting in uneven thickness and possible kick back. Maybe using smaller diameter blades would work. What you are doing is a job for a shaper or a planer/molder.

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MrRon

3927 posts in 2710 days


#8 posted 04-29-2016 06:23 PM

Duplicate post

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splintergroup

829 posts in 689 days


#9 posted 04-29-2016 06:26 PM

I also don’t see any real issues. Dado set parts will work, but most outer dado blades have beveled grind teeth which would not give a very flat bottom cut. I think better results could come with a gang of three flat tooth rip blades.

Also consider that most large dado stacks are 8”, not the normal 10” of a table saw. Although a typical 8” dado stack has greater rotational inertia than three 10” blades, you could/should stick to 8” (or more popular 7-3/4”) blades (cheaper as well!).

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#10 posted 04-29-2016 06:42 PM

use steel spacers and keep the digits out of them and youll be fine. I would say that the reason you haven’t seen saws advertised for that is because there arent too many people making clothes pins or need to score in that method, not because it is unsafe. I wouldnt rip through the board with a stack, though this is doable: google Gang saw.

go get em

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Deela40's profile

Deela40

92 posts in 2555 days


#11 posted 04-29-2016 07:46 PM

Thanks for all the feedback thus far. I may try these blades and see how it works.

-- www.heritageclothespins.com

View JohnDon's profile

JohnDon

61 posts in 636 days


#12 posted 04-29-2016 08:01 PM

As an alternative to using washers as spacers, you might try using CD’s. They conveniently have 5/8” center holes, are dead flat (washers might have burrs and deflections from the stamping), and they have a lot of surface area to bear against the blades, so they will more likely to stay parallel and not wobble. With the shallow grooves you’re making, they wouldn’t interfere with the cut, even with 7-1/4” blades. If they don’t give you exactly the right distance between the blades, you can use them as patterns to cut shims from paper or thin cardboard.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7224 posts in 2842 days


#13 posted 04-29-2016 08:06 PM


Thanks for all the feedback thus far. I may try these blades and see how it works.

- Deela40

I don’t see why it couldn’t work if your saw has the arbor length and the power. I do think you can do a lot better than those Irwin Classic blades though…you can get Freud Diablo 24T blades for the same price, or the 40T for another $5 ea…..much better blades.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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splintergroup

829 posts in 689 days


#14 posted 04-29-2016 08:36 PM

Watch out for circular saw blades, they usually are thin kerf, i.e. much less than 1/8” wide (if that is your target groove width). Also look for FTG (flat top grind) if you want flat bottomed grooves.

Alternatively you could use a single FTG rip blade and make up a set of spacers (or even carriers) you place between the workpiece and the table saw fence. This would require a pass for each groove, but there would be no extra setup or fence moves, just make a pass, switch to the next carrier, another pass, rinse, repeat.

View Deela40's profile

Deela40

92 posts in 2555 days


#15 posted 04-29-2016 08:49 PM


I don t see what it couldn t work if your saw has the arbor length and the power. I do think you can do a lot better than those Irwin Classic blades though…you can get Freud Diablo 24T blades for the same price, or the 40T for another $5 ea…..much better blades.

- knotscott

I will check out the Diablo blades. I was just looking for some cheap ones see if it worked.

-- www.heritageclothespins.com

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