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Forum topic by JustLikeJames posted 04-28-2016 04:50 PM 659 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JustLikeJames

132 posts in 1027 days


04-28-2016 04:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: blade freud fusion

I have used a Freud industrial 50 tooth thin kerf combination blade for years on my 1.5 hp contractor saw. It worked so well and for so long that until now I had no reason to consider other blades. I now have a 3hp jet xacta saw and that old blade is pretty dull.
So, time for a new blade. I was considering the full kerf version of the same blade until I discovered the fusion 40 tooth combination that (based on the marketing) is even better, albeit higher cost.

Thoughts?


19 replies so far

View jmartel's profile (online now)

jmartel

6572 posts in 1615 days


#1 posted 04-28-2016 04:53 PM

Buy separate rip and crosscut blades. You’ll get better results than a combo. Faster rips, cleaner crosscuts. I use Freud for both blades as well.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Fred Hargis

3944 posts in 1958 days


#2 posted 04-28-2016 05:00 PM

The 40 tooth will work just fine.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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JustLikeJames

132 posts in 1027 days


#3 posted 04-28-2016 05:04 PM

Well, I have a Freud glue line rip blade for really critical rips. For general work, switching blades often is just too much hassle. I don’t have a miter saw so everything is done on the table saw. The combo blade I have actually cuts pretty nice with just about any material, just sounds like the fusion 40 tooth is even better. Trying to find out if it’s true, worth the extra $, or if it’s all just marketing.


Buy separate rip and crosscut blades. You ll get better results than a combo. Faster rips, cleaner crosscuts. I use Freud for both blades as well.

- jmartel


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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#4 posted 04-28-2016 05:14 PM

“Better” is subjective, and there’s really never a free lunch. IMO the Fusion has more potential for cleaner cuts than the LU84, but is more sensitive to setup, has more tendency to burn, and will dull faster due to the sharp points of the Hi-ATB grind. If you’re meticulous about the setup of your saw, flatten and straighten your wood prior to sawing, and have good technique, the Fusion can be one of the cleanest cutting general purpose blades going.

On the other hand if you’re really looking to improve the performance of your saw and saw blades, why go with a jack of all trades blade and not a task specific specialist? General purpose/combo blades are inherently not excellent at anything….they don’t rip as efficiently as a 24T bulk rip blade, and they don’t cut as cleanly as an 80T crosscut/plywood blade. Their strength is their versatility. If you want to stay with Freud, their LM72 and LU80 or LU85 will offer better performance within their respective scopes.

If you want to explore some other top brands, I’ve found that Infinity is consistently as good or better than any I’ve tried, and their prices are pretty reasonable. I consider them state-of-the-art among readily available top consumer brands …their 010-024 and 010-080 would be comparable to the LM72/LU80 by Freud. Ridge Carbide and Forrest are also top shelf blades, but tend to get more expensive without necessarily being better.

If you still want just one all purpose blade, I’d consider the Infinity Super General 010-044 or Combomax 010-050. The Super General is very impressive and is a very similar design to the Fusion, with similar pros and cons. The Combomax is similar in design to the LU84, but I’ve found it to be better overall than the LU84…it’s a great “set it and forget it” blade that’s easy to get great results with.

The Delta 35-7657 has got to be the best bang for the buck on the market. It’s a classic 40T full kerf ATB grind made in the USA, has large C-4 micrograin carbide, hiqh quality laser cut steel, and good precision manufacturing for a grand total of ~ $30 to your door. It’ll rival some of the best, and should easily hold it’s own against the LU84.

Tips for Picking Saw Blades

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

330 posts in 1435 days


#5 posted 04-28-2016 05:15 PM

I use a Diablo DX1080 for just about all of my cutting including rip cuts. I have a 24T rip blade which I used when ripping thick (2~3”) material. for 3/4” material I have found no difference in cutting speed between the 24T rip and the 80T crosscut.

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JustLikeJames

132 posts in 1027 days


#6 posted 04-28-2016 05:27 PM

Wow! Thanks. You’ve given me a lot of good suggestions. I’m going to look into the other brands. I just had good luck with freud and didn’t know who else to consider. I knew about Forrest but I’m not willing to spend that kind of money, afterall this is just a hobby for me.

Thanks


“Better” is subjective, and there s really never a free lunch. IMO the Fusion has more potential for cleaner cuts than the LU84, but is more sensitive to setup, has more tendency to burn, and will dull faster due to the sharp points of the Hi-ATB grind. If you re meticulous about the setup of your saw, flatten and straighten your wood prior to sawing, and have good technique, the Fusion can be one of the cleanest cutting general purpose blades going.

On the other hand if you re really looking to improve the performance of your saw and saw blades, why go with a jack of all trades blade and not a task specific specialist? General purpose/combo blades are inherently not excellent at anything….they don t rip as efficiently as a 24T bulk rip blade, and they don t cut as cleanly as an 80T crosscut/plywood blade. Their strength is their versatility. If you want to stay with Freud, their LM72 and LU80 or LU85 will offer better performance within their respective scopes.

If you want to explore some other top brands, I ve found that Infinity is consistently as good or better than any I ve tried, and their prices are pretty reasonable. I consider them state-of-the-art among readily available top consumer brands …their 010-024 and 010-080 would be comparable to the LM72/LU80 by Freud. Ridge Carbide and Forrest are also top shelf blades, but tend to get more expensive without necessarily being better.

If you still want just one all purpose blade, I d consider the Infinity Super General 010-044 or Combomax 010-050. The Super General is very impressive and is a very similar design to the Fusion, with similar pros and cons. The Combomax is similar in design to the LU84, but I ve found it to be better overall than the LU84…it s a great “set it and forget it” blade that s easy to get great results with.

The Delta 35-7657 has got to be the best bang for the buck on the market. It s a classic 40T full kerf ATB grind made in the USA, has large C-4 micrograin carbide, hiqh quality laser cut steel, and good precision manufacturing for a grand total of ~ $30 to your door. It ll rival some of the best, and should easily hold it s own against the LU84.

Tips for Picking Saw Blades

- knotscott


View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


#7 posted 04-28-2016 05:38 PM

love me some woodworker II.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

513 posts in 323 days


#8 posted 04-28-2016 05:41 PM

I’ve been using the Fusion blade on my 1.75hp saw with great success.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 617 days


#9 posted 04-28-2016 05:50 PM

If you go to Freuds site and look at the blades they have a cutting rating I us the 24t rip, it is rated excellent for ripping and very good for cross cuts, which I have found to be true. If you look at the fussion and combo they are just rated very good for cross cuts and ripping. Since I do most of my cross cuts on a fine tooth CPMS I go with the rip blade every time since my TS is only 1HP I also use the thin kerf.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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waho6o9

7174 posts in 2042 days


#10 posted 04-28-2016 05:52 PM

Big ol carbides on this puppy:

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jmartel

6572 posts in 1615 days


#11 posted 04-28-2016 05:55 PM



Well, I have a Freud glue line rip blade for really critical rips. For general work, switching blades often is just too much hassle. I don t have a miter saw so everything is done on the table saw. The combo blade I have actually cuts pretty nice with just about any material, just sounds like the fusion 40 tooth is even better. Trying to find out if it s true, worth the extra $, or if it s all just marketing.

Buy separate rip and crosscut blades. You ll get better results than a combo. Faster rips, cleaner crosscuts. I use Freud for both blades as well.

- jmartel

- JustLikeJames

Using only a TS is more of a reason to have multiple blades. Blade changes should be pretty quick. Mine takes me about 1 min. Just plan your cuts to have as little changes as possible. You will never get as clean of a crosscut off of a combo blade as you will with a 60T or 80T blade. And you will never get as fast or as clean of a rip cut as you will with a rip blade.

Plus, if you get a rip blade with a flat top grind, it can be used for cutting joinery. Square bottomed grooves.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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JustLikeJames

132 posts in 1027 days


#12 posted 04-28-2016 07:22 PM

I’m kinda surprised that one doesn’t have the fancy looking laser cut expansion slots like most. But I trust knotscott’s recommendation that it’s a good blade.


Big ol carbides on this puppy:

- waho6o9


View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4858 posts in 2278 days


#13 posted 04-28-2016 08:33 PM

Freud LU86 thin kerf is my blade. You could choose thin or standard kerf on a 3hp saw.
For $39 I don’t think any other blade can really compete at that price point.
I was using a Freud 50 tooth before switching to the LU86, and I won’t be going back.
It crosscuts just as well, and rips with less effort.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View bbc557ci's profile

bbc557ci

589 posts in 1539 days


#14 posted 04-28-2016 09:10 PM

FWIW…. Using my 3HP Unisaw I’ve straightened and ripped to width several hundred BF of rough cut 4/4 Ash with a 50T LU84R011 and have also used it for miscellaneous cross cuts on Ash, plywood, and other woods. Cuts are nice and smooth and the blade still cuts well. I’m not at all saying a dedicated ripper and or dedicated cross cutter would not be better. Just say’n the blade has been a very good performer overall.

-- Bill, central NY...no where near the "big apple"

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JustLikeJames

132 posts in 1027 days


#15 posted 04-28-2016 10:14 PM

Well said. My blade is the same one, except it’s the thin kerf version. I’ve have gotten an incredible amount of mileage out of it. I rarely feel the need to use my dedicated rip blade. To each his own though.


FWIW…. Using my 3HP Unisaw I ve straightened and ripped to width several hundred BF of rough cut 4/4 Ash with a 50T LU84R011 and have also used it for miscellaneous cross cuts on Ash, plywood, and other woods. Cuts are nice and smooth and the blade still cuts well. I m not at all saying a dedicated ripper and or dedicated cross cutter would not be better. Just say n the blade has been a very good performer overall.

- bbc557ci


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