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Forum topic by grub32 posted 03-27-2010 04:27 AM 1953 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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grub32

209 posts in 1772 days


03-27-2010 04:27 AM

I want some advice… I am going to be helping a friend make some panels using rail and stile bits. Which cut is the best to make first? the long cuts or the end grain??

thanks for the help… I haven’t used these bits in a long time and want to make it look good.

Grub

-- Science Teacher by Day, Wood Butcher by Night!!


14 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112538 posts in 2301 days


#1 posted 03-27-2010 04:51 AM

Hey Grub
Your talking about cope and stick cuts? If so you need to make a sample of the stick (the cut the length of the wood) then a sample of the cope (the end grain) these are set up blocks. After making the set up blocks so that they fit together just right. Then I cut long enough stick material to get the job done and then cope cut to fit. Make sure to make extra material. Save the set up blocks for next time.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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GFYS

711 posts in 2195 days


#2 posted 03-27-2010 04:55 AM

ends first

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a1Jim

112538 posts in 2301 days


#3 posted 03-27-2010 04:57 AM

You can’t cut the cope (the ends) intill you have run the material with the sticks profile first.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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GFYS

711 posts in 2195 days


#4 posted 03-27-2010 05:00 AM

nonsense.

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a1Jim

112538 posts in 2301 days


#5 posted 03-27-2010 05:04 AM

Hey mic
I guess you could build the roof to a house first if you want to. LOL

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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GFYS

711 posts in 2195 days


#6 posted 03-27-2010 05:06 AM

I certainly wouldnt be an ass and tell everyone it’s impossible

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Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1792 days


#7 posted 03-27-2010 05:08 AM

I like to do the stick cuts first, then use one of the stick cuts to set up my cope cutting bit. One or two cope cuts in scrap, and I usually have the height exactly where I want it.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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a1Jim

112538 posts in 2301 days


#8 posted 03-27-2010 05:08 AM

I’m glad for you
It seems that I stand corrected. You can cut the cope first, but to me it makes more sence to cut the sticks first for set up purposes. If your having trouble with tear out you simply run a long cope sacrafical cope and place it in the stick before doing the cope cut.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View GFYS's profile

GFYS

711 posts in 2195 days


#9 posted 03-27-2010 05:12 AM

...but since you asked so respectfully, I cut the end grains first because its much easier to prevent tear out with a backer board on unprofiled rails.

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DocK16

1140 posts in 2810 days


#10 posted 03-27-2010 05:34 AM

I just finished cutting some of these this week and got a lesson on how to avoid tear out.

Method 1 Cut the side rails first to get the proper cutter heiight. Then change to the 2nd matching cutter head set it to the riight height and cut the matching (mirror cut)cut on the endgrain of the stiles. Then change back to the 1st cutter to cut the long grain on the cuts on the stiles. Don’t want to change cutter heads more than once try 2nd method.

Method 2 Cut the rails as in the 1st method, then (with the same cutter head) cut the long grain parts of the stiles. This leaves the matching endgrain cuts on the stiles for last. In order to avoid tear out of the end grain you must use a tight fitting backer board. This backer board is made by making a cut with the second cutter head (but with the grain) along a scrap piece the same length as the stiles and fitting it snugly to the mirrored part of the stiles By doing this you provide a tight backer for the endgrain fibers of the stiles avoiding tear out. Always use a miter or coping sled when doing end grain cuts.
I hope is explained this well enough to understand it.

-- Common sense is so rare anymore when you do see it, it looks like pure genius.

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GFYS

711 posts in 2195 days


#11 posted 03-27-2010 05:34 AM

If your having trouble with tear out you simply run a long cope sacrafical cope and place it in the stick before doing the cope cut.

Thats fine for preventing the tearout on the side with the stick profile…what about on the unprofiled side…do you switch to an unprofiled backer? Seems like alot of switching back and forth to me.

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a1Jim

112538 posts in 2301 days


#12 posted 03-27-2010 05:43 AM

In any router cut you can back up you cut with a backer board to prevent blow out as doc suggested or just make your material wider and joint off the blow out.
Everyone does things the way that works for them. I guess the way to find out what you like best is try it both ways with some scrap and see what you like.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2698 posts in 2010 days


#13 posted 03-27-2010 07:24 PM

I see professional shops doing it both ways. There are advantages either way.

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

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grub32

209 posts in 1772 days


#14 posted 03-27-2010 07:25 PM

I thank you all for the info and the reason why…

Grub

-- Science Teacher by Day, Wood Butcher by Night!!

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