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Forum topic by SouthernRustic posted 04-24-2016 10:03 PM 694 views 1 time favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SouthernRustic

23 posts in 234 days


04-24-2016 10:03 PM

If this is in the wrong spot let me know and i will move it.

I tend to freehand all my plans for my projects and what not. Granted there is a margin of human error in drawing yourself. I wanted to ask, what kind of design software are you guys using to plan out your jobs, projects, etc? I am not willing to drop the monumental money on auto CAD (nor do i know how to use it) so something user friendly would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in Advance!

-- Jeff


9 replies so far

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boatz

79 posts in 1118 days


#1 posted 04-24-2016 10:04 PM

Sketchup – and it is free!

-- You can't always get what you want. But if you try sometimes you just might find, you'll get what you need

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jgt1942

138 posts in 1356 days


#2 posted 04-24-2016 11:03 PM

I use SketchUp (the offical name for the free version is SketchUp Make 2016” get it from http://www.sketchup.com/download/all?cv=p16.0.19912&ctyp=sm&su_bits=64&os_bits=64&suhl=en-US&hl=en-US&os=win&osv=6.3)

Also get Fine Woodworking – Google Sketchup Guide for Woodworkers, and Focal Press (Elsevier) Google SketchUp Workshop 2011-Laurent Brixius.

You will also find some great videos on YouTube.
There tons of models that you can download from the 3D warehouse (free)
Another excellent resource is http://sketchucation.com/

I use it for almost all of my wood projects.

-- JohnT

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ArtMann

147 posts in 284 days


#3 posted 04-24-2016 11:09 PM

I suggest Sketchup too but if you want a simpler alternative that is powerful and free, try Draftsight. It is a 2-D program that provides all the functionality of Autocad 12 , a former industry standard. I use themboth for different purposes.

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SteveT

22 posts in 711 days


#4 posted 04-24-2016 11:47 PM

Thanks for the Draftsight tip. It works with Linux, which for some reason Sketchup refuses to do. I just installed it and played with it for a bit. It looks promising. I will try to get some time to play with it.

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2598 days


#5 posted 04-25-2016 02:47 AM

AutoCAD’s Fusion 360 is free for hobbyists, and is a very powerful package.
Here’s an image of the jointer I’m building from Fusion 360:

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View SouthernRustic's profile

SouthernRustic

23 posts in 234 days


#6 posted 04-29-2016 02:40 PM

just downloaded Draftsight and sketch up. I will try and play with them today if work isnt too busy today. one day I can hopefully ditch the day job and build 100% until that day, i got to pay the bills.

-- Jeff

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xeddog

117 posts in 2475 days


#7 posted 04-29-2016 05:45 PM

If you are using 64-bit Windows or Mac (32-bit is NOT supported) and have a fairly decent computer, give Fusion 360 a try. It is a very powerful tool and has many features that SketchUp doesn’t have. Having played around with both of them, there are many things that Fusion can do easily that SketchUp just cannot do at all, but there are some things in SketchUp that are easy to do that are more of a pita in Fusion.

One thing about Fusion. It is cloud based. That means that to use it you need to establish an account with Autodesk (free and easy to do), you must have online access, and all of your designs are stored in their cloud. That also means that you can’t easily store your designs on your local machine. I have read there is a way to do it, but you lose a lot of update capabilities or some such.

Personally, all but one of my computers run Linux, and Autodesk support for Linux is non-existent and is not planned. You can’t get an executable installer for Fusion so you can’t run Fusion as a Wine application (Wine is a Windows emulator for Linux), and you can’t run it in a Windows virtual machine using Oracle VirtualBox, or VMware because of a lack of video memory available to the guest machines. Oh well.

Wayne

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 698 days


#8 posted 04-29-2016 05:53 PM

As a design engineer I use for projects what I use every day: Unigraphics. Takes years to learn well and its real expensive. So shoot for something else. But thats what I use.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2598 days


#9 posted 04-29-2016 06:58 PM



One thing about Fusion. It is cloud based. That means that to use it you need to establish an account with Autodesk (free and easy to do), you must have online access, and all of your designs are stored in their cloud. That also means that you can t easily store your designs on your local machine. I have read there is a way to do it, but you lose a lot of update capabilities or some such.

Not entirely accurate. While you do need an internet connection, you can save all your designs on your PC, and can work for up either 15 or 30 days (can’t remember right now) without connecting to their servers.
So yes, it’s easy to save your designs locally, and there is no loss of capabilities.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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