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Forum topic by zlatanv posted 03-25-2010 02:48 AM 903 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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zlatanv

689 posts in 1887 days


03-25-2010 02:48 AM

Making an entertainment cabinet and wall panel for a flat screen tv. Need to confirm an idea on hanging the panel.

Customer wants a flat panel to hang a TV (48”x30” outside dimensions), they have no empty wall space to put it on and want to cover a window with the panel, window is 47”x71” high. I have built the panel in the picture, It is 56”x75” high.

Panel is 3/4 oak ply, fluted sides are 1 1/16” thick and 4 1/2” wide, the customer doesn’t want the panel sticking away from the wall but flat against the wall and sitting on the windowsill, which is 23” from the floor. The cabinet will sit under it, over lapping the bottom and hiding the windowsill, butted up against the panel on the wall.

I was planning on a french cleat on the back of the panel using 2×4s at 47” wide at about 16” from the top and bottom of the window. Mounting the support part of the cleat on the inside of the window on 2×2’s mounted on each side of the window. The depth of the window is 3” from the wall to the window with no moulding around it.

Plan on keeping the panel about 1/4 to 1/2” off the windowsill incase any moisture builds from the window so it doesn’t wick up the bottom of the panel and to have some air flow, I have routed some grooves at the top of the back of the panel to let air flow up from behind the panel.

Does this sound like a good support method? Should I put a 2×2 in the middle of the support so it won’t sag over time? Any suggestions?

-- Z, Rockwall, TX


8 replies so far

View Sawdust4Blood's profile

Sawdust4Blood

348 posts in 1674 days


#1 posted 03-25-2010 03:35 AM

Is their plan to attach the TV to the panel or on a stand in front of it? The mounting method sounds fine if it’s on a stand in front but wall mounting flat panel TVs is normally accomplished by attaching the TV bracket directly to at least 2 adjacent studs.

Not sure what your climate there is like but trapping the void against a window could result in some pretty severe temperature swings in the gap behind your panel if your area has hot days and cold nights (especially if the window is south facing). My recollection of high school science class (a long time ago) is that condensation forms on the warm side of the glass (when warm moist air hits a cold pane of glass) which could be the outside if you have cold a/c in the house in a hot humid climate or on the inside if you have moist warm air in the house when it’s cold outside. However, it seems to me that if your panel is blocking the window from the rest of the house (keeping the a/c away from the glass in the summer and the heat away in the winter), it might actually reduce the chances of condensation on the window just as dual pane windows do…on the other hand, I didn’t do too well in that science class.

-- Greg, Severn MD

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zlatanv

689 posts in 1887 days


#2 posted 03-25-2010 04:17 AM

Thanks Greg, They want the TV attached to the panel. The window is double insulated so I don’t really think it will sweet but still wanted to leave a gap at the bottom just incase, or if the window leaks. I was hoping the gap at the bottom and the grooves at the top will help air flow through the void, plus it will have a hole behind the the tv and at the bottom for cables.

Not sure how heavy the tv is, worried about strength of the support holding the panel? They don’t want it protruding out too far from the wall so I don’t think it will be one of those swivel or telescoping tv mounts.

Just thought…, maybe a brace screwed in along the top with two more 2×2s vertically in the center supporting the cleat, so it would have 4 2×2s vertically over a 47” span across, one screwed to each side of the window with the cleats screwed to each 2×2 stud and the top brace keeping it from pulling out at the top. ?? Wish I could do sketch up.

-- Z, Rockwall, TX

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Sawdust4Blood

348 posts in 1674 days


#3 posted 03-25-2010 04:32 AM

I like the idea of the extra vertical 2×2s in the center. Almost like framing the opening in. With that set up, I would think that you would be okay as long at the combined weight of the panel and TV isn’t excessive. I would use long screws on the two vertical 2×2s at the sides so they go all the way into the studs framing the window opening and not just the side trim…but I might be overly scared of any possibility of someone’s $1500 TV coming off the wall.

In any event, it’s a really nice panel. Did you mill all the trim work yourself?

-- Greg, Severn MD

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zlatanv

689 posts in 1887 days


#4 posted 03-25-2010 04:46 AM

Thanks, yes, did the milling on the sides, used oak crown molding from HD for the top. I have a carving overlay that will go in the center space at the top that matches one on their fireplace mantel.

There is no trim on the window, the sides are just done with drywall. I was thinking the same thing about the tv coming down, thats why I love this site, you can get some other opinions, tips and tricks.

-- Z, Rockwall, TX

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zlatanv

689 posts in 1887 days


#5 posted 03-25-2010 04:53 AM

This is where they got the general idea from, but in a different style.

-- Z, Rockwall, TX

View LeeG's profile

LeeG

40 posts in 1674 days


#6 posted 03-25-2010 06:59 PM

Could you build a torsion box to fit in the window too mount it on? That would give you plenty of rigidity and a smooth panel vs a frame when viewed from the outside.

-- Lee in Phoenix

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zlatanv

689 posts in 1887 days


#7 posted 03-25-2010 11:16 PM

They want to keep the mini-blind in behind the panel so it looks the same as the window next to it on the outside, its in the back, side yard and fenced so it won’t be seen from the street.

I have seen other tvs mounted to panels but never looked at them closer, should have done that.

-- Z, Rockwall, TX

View closetguy's profile

closetguy

744 posts in 2545 days


#8 posted 03-26-2010 04:25 AM

My rule of thumb is if I think it should have more bracing, I will add it. Overkill it much better when expensive items are hanging off them. It will certainly help you sleep better at night.

-- I don't make mistakes, only design changes....www.dgmwoodworks.com

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