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Need help, powder post beetle / longhorn beetle in finished box.

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Forum topic by Blackie_ posted 04-20-2016 11:31 PM 1034 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blackie_

4531 posts in 1974 days


04-20-2016 11:31 PM

Need some help and or advise, I just received a call from one of my customers with findings of fine sawdust in one of the drawers of a box I sold him, he’s not upset with the box and construction more so concerned. The wood in question is cedar elm air dried. The box walls are 5/8” thick finished with Tung oil and wipe on poly, the inside of the drawers are painted with enamel and flocked. So putting it in the oven might not be an option so would freezing be an option?

Thanks

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs


19 replies so far

View Roger's profile

Roger

19867 posts in 2265 days


#1 posted 04-20-2016 11:56 PM

How in the heck would they still be alive after all the finish is sealing them in?? Sorry, I don’t have an answer for ya, but, it’ll be interesting to hear some ideas

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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Blackie_

4531 posts in 1974 days


#2 posted 04-21-2016 12:19 AM

The customer sent me some pictures and the area he’s pointing out is from the kiln dried knotty alder, is it possible that larva could have survived the drying? Also that area of wood in the alder is but only 1/4” thick.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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Mrkixx

62 posts in 1441 days


#3 posted 04-21-2016 12:37 AM

Well I, living in Canada, would just try putting it in the freezer for a few days or so because if they are now not in larva stage then they may just freeze to death, however you might need to be careful with the box and see how it holds up to the change in temp maybe you could buy it back and see what happens for yourself or offer to make him a new one to replace that one, in the mean time find out which wood type is the problem and do some research to see what kind of creature it is and maybe you will find out what can be done to kill them off. You might also want to find another source for your stock , because chances are that other species could have the same problem. I’m really very interested to see and hear what the end result will be.

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Blackie_

4531 posts in 1974 days


#4 posted 04-21-2016 12:42 AM

What about a hair dryer aimed at the target area?

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View  woodshaver (Tony)  's profile

woodshaver (Tony)

4003 posts in 2814 days


#5 posted 04-21-2016 12:50 AM

Maybe calling a furniture fumigation service would have some answers for you Randy.

I also found this about half way down the page.

-- Tony C UAW, St Augustine FL, My high school shop teacher said "You can do it"... Now I can't stop!

View Jim Jakosh's profile (online now)

Jim Jakosh

17135 posts in 2567 days


#6 posted 04-21-2016 02:12 AM

Boy that’s a tough one, Randy with it being finished and all. I would have thought the kiln would have gotten hot enough to kill the beetles. Fumigating with a gas seems to be the best way but the microwave is worth a try because it will cook them for sure if the piece will fit in it. I’d be concerned for a glue joint, however.

Down at the Sawmill in Az, John sold a mesquite table to customer and she called him to say she heard something in the table. It was the bugs in the sapwood. He had to cut off all the sapwood and replace it with a contrasting wood. Bugs in mesquite can live 35 years and turn all the sapwood and some of the heart wood to yellow dust! I’m doing a table right now and the sapwood was dropping yellow dust for days. I wound up grinding all the bark and sap wood off and hit 12 white worms in there in the process. That wood was sitting in the sun for a long time at over 140 degrees sometimes so they can take heat!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View bosum3919's profile

bosum3919

338 posts in 1081 days


#7 posted 04-21-2016 02:17 AM

Randy, my solution would be to double bag the box. On the inside bag, I would puncture with multiple small needle sized holes. Seal that bag shut with the box inside. Place the needle punctured bag into the next bag. Lightly spray the inside of that bag with an aerosol type insecticide and seal shut. Repeat the spray process every day for a week. That should resolve the problem. Remember, “light” spray is the key. You don’t want to saturate the box.

-- Bob

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AZWoody

693 posts in 685 days


#8 posted 04-21-2016 02:18 AM

I have a lot of mesquite that I’ve milled that has beetles in it. I’m waiting it for it to get hot enough to make a hot box that I can hopefully get up to at least 150 degrees Fahrenheit. I’ve tried chemical treatments with borax based sprays and it killed some, but not all. Eventually, the dust piles would start coming again.

Freezing might work, but an oven I think would work faster and you can be sure. Some insects are pretty hardy and can go dormant in cold weather. No idea if those beetles can but why risk it?

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4531 posts in 1974 days


#9 posted 04-21-2016 02:25 AM

After further speaking with the customer I’m pretty sure it’s not the kiln dried alder that the dust is coming from its the outside cedar elm which makes more sense since it was air dried. I’m keeping in contact with customer monitoring. Thanks for the suggestions. I need all the help I can get here as the customer really likes the box and doesn’t want to lose it.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7700 posts in 2304 days


#10 posted 04-21-2016 02:44 AM

Randy,

Is the box repairable? Can you construct a new one? I’ve run into the ash bore in my storage area. Can’t see them but I see the holes. Bought some insecticide that relies on boric acid. (safe for humans and pets) Naturally occurring insecticide.

You might request the box returned to fumigate it yourself, but that may not guarantee there will be no more bugs.

I’m sure you are going to rethink your processes.

Good luck!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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Monte Pittman

21994 posts in 1799 days


#11 posted 04-21-2016 03:07 AM

I would think that heat would kill the bugs. 150° for maybe an hour.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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Blackie_

4531 posts in 1974 days


#12 posted 04-21-2016 03:10 AM

Monte, would that amount of heat be ok on the wood and joints also finish?

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7700 posts in 2304 days


#13 posted 04-21-2016 03:55 AM

Randy,

Check this out.

http://www.epestsupply.com/powder-post-beetles.php#.VxhO3jArKhc

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View splatman's profile

splatman

557 posts in 860 days


#14 posted 04-21-2016 04:36 AM

To find out whether microwaving would be safe, build a small box with all the same woods, glues and finishes, and nuke it. Then show us the end results.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1937 days


#15 posted 04-21-2016 11:35 AM

I would put it in the oven, too, at 150 degrees for 12 hours and take your chances. Powderpost beetles can live in wood for years. There is a chance that fumigation will not penetrate deep into the wood where the beetle larvae and eggs are.

At the end of my kiln cycle, I always run the temp to 150 degrees and hold it for 24 hours to sterilize the wood.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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