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Forum topic by Michael James posted 03-23-2010 11:33 PM 1094 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Michael James

89 posts in 2516 days


03-23-2010 11:33 PM

Newbie question.

I’m replacing my 40 tooth combination blade that came with my ridgid table saw. I bought a 60 tooth combination blade but am not sure it’s the right one…should I take it back and get the 50 tooth?

-- Michael James - www.michaeljames.ca


9 replies so far

View Michael Murphy's profile

Michael Murphy

452 posts in 2473 days


#1 posted 03-24-2010 12:02 AM

60 tooth blades work well. They are usually smoother cutting than the combo types and make a good all purpose blade. The grind on the teeth makes a lot of difference as well. ATB (alternate top bevel) is good, they can have different angles on the bevel too. Rip blades have Square teeth. Triple Chip have a different grind, teeth are shaped like a kind of flat pointy cone. ATB seems to be the most common. Triple or Unichip are more for laminates and melamine.

The tooth hook angle is important in how aggresive a blade is. Your old 40 tooth has teeth that angle forward
from a line drawn through the center of the blade. There are alot of blades available that reduce chipping by having a negative hook to the teeth but it slows the feed rate you can use and requires more power to run.

You want a good quality blade that doesn’t wobble and is well sharpened. Look for ones that have the expansion holes plugged with copper or (plastic now adays) or otherwise take pains to reduce the noise level. That makes a lot of difference too.

One thing that helps with alot of blade issues is a set of stiffeners. They are just large machined and balanced washers about 3/32 thick, that go on either side of the blade and are bigger than the standard flange by a few inches in diameter or so. Really helps steady the blade. I always use them except when I need to raise the blade up all the way, then they stick up above the table a bit.

-- Michael Murphy, Woodland, CA.

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knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#2 posted 03-24-2010 01:15 AM

All blades aren’t created equal. The 60T could be a good purchase depending on what blade it is… what did you buy?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Michael James's profile

Michael James

89 posts in 2516 days


#3 posted 03-24-2010 01:17 AM

It’s a ridgid blade.

http://bit.ly/cyNi02

-- Michael James - www.michaeljames.ca

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knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#4 posted 03-24-2010 01:36 AM

What to get depends a lot on what you cut. The Ridgid Titanium R1060C is a pretty nice blade… I’d definitely keep it. It has an ATB grind, a special double side grind that helps give polished edges, and a fairly steep 15° hook which allows it to rip reasonably well for what is normally considered a crosscut blade (up to ~ 6/4” ). It’ll be better in ply and crosscuts than a 40T or 50T blade. It’s made in Italy by Freud, and is actually very similar to their LU88R010. You may want add a 24T or 30T thin kerf ripper (like the Freud LU87 or Forrest WWII 30T) if you cut very thick materials, but the 60T Ridgid should handle the bulk of cuts.

I would not spend money on a stabilizer unless you’ve got a runout or vibration problem.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Ingjr's profile

Ingjr

144 posts in 2484 days


#5 posted 03-24-2010 03:12 AM

I’m a big fan of the Ridgid replacement blades. Never used a 60t but I’d like to have one to backup my 50t.

-- The older I get the faster I was.

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Michael James

89 posts in 2516 days


#6 posted 03-24-2010 03:36 AM

Sounds good – I’ll keep it and try it out.

I’m not sure if this warrants another topic, but has anyone tried using the blade guard/splitter on the Ridgid cast iron saw? I cannot get the splitter lined up well enough to be useful. Every time I rip a piece of wood, I have to tap the guard so the splitter goes in the kerf. For long pieces, it usually jams and I have to pull the piece out, take off the splitter/guard and finish the cut without it…

Any thoughts?

-- Michael James - www.michaeljames.ca

View Sawdust4Blood's profile

Sawdust4Blood

392 posts in 2489 days


#7 posted 03-24-2010 03:54 AM

sounds like you have an alignment issue. I’d check the splitter alignment to the blade, make sure the fence is square and that the blade is not heeling.

-- Greg, Severn MD

View Michael James's profile

Michael James

89 posts in 2516 days


#8 posted 03-24-2010 05:01 AM

I did check the alignment and can’t get it any closer. What’s healing?

-- Michael James - www.michaeljames.ca

View Sawdust4Blood's profile

Sawdust4Blood

392 posts in 2489 days


#9 posted 03-24-2010 12:48 PM

If the blade is not parallel to the miter gauge slot (and subsequently not in a straight line with the splitter). You’ll need a dial indicator to check that the distance from the miter gauge slot to the front edge of the blade is the same as the distance to the back edge. Your owner’s manual should have a procedure for adjusting if necessary.

-- Greg, Severn MD

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