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New Old Plane - Stanley #7C

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Forum topic by bbasiaga posted 04-20-2016 02:46 AM 583 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbasiaga

756 posts in 1458 days


04-20-2016 02:46 AM

I found this at a local antique place. I figured what the heck – it was $300+ cheaper than a new one, and I’m sure I’ll find a use for it.

Looked pretty gross:

 photo 20160419_200957_zpsk1sqepav.jpg

 photo 20160419_201008_zpsftmc6npf.jpg

It cleaned up very nice though. All I’ve done so far is clean the crud off, hit it with some rust remover, and then a little oil to protect it. I’ll have to sharpen the iron later.

 photo 20160419_211414_zpslt6ddeoj.jpg

The original japanning is about 50% there. It has the three patent dates on the sole, Bailey at the front, and the iron says Stanley Rule and Level Co, plus another patent date. The depth adjustement is brass. I’m thinking this is a Type 11. Anyone agree or disagree? I’m not sure about the tote and knob though…they look painted red. I believe that means they may have been changed, as the No 4 Type 11 I have has unpainted handles. It could be a #12, but something I read said those were the first Sweethearts, and this one doesn’t say sweetheart anywhere.

Thanks,
Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.


19 replies so far

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14571 posts in 2146 days


#1 posted 04-20-2016 04:07 AM

Three patent dayes came be either a type 11 or a type 12

The SW would be stamped on the iron, right below the Stanley in a clipped box.

Hyperkitten has a plane dating chart.

The red handles were by a previous owner. The 92 patent date was for the relocation of the round hole in the iron. Usually these were a Type7-9 type 10 had just two patent dates on the base casting.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Clarkie's profile

Clarkie

380 posts in 1304 days


#2 posted 04-20-2016 10:57 AM

Just take the handle and knob off and look at the bottom of them, more than likely it was rosewood before someone painted them. You can take the paint off and redo the finish on the rosewood.

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hotbyte

842 posts in 2438 days


#3 posted 04-20-2016 11:10 AM

Nice find!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#4 posted 04-20-2016 11:27 AM

Brian you’ll have a nice plane there when you’re done unless it had to be a Stanley for that money you could have bought a new one.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#5 posted 04-20-2016 11:29 AM



Future reference $300 is too much for an unrestored plane but you will have a nice plane there when you re done. BTW, (unless it had to be a Stanley) for that money you could have bought a new one.

- rwe2156


-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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hotbyte

842 posts in 2438 days


#6 posted 04-20-2016 11:39 AM

He didn’t pay $300…he paid $300 LESS than a new one :)


I found this at a local antique place. I figured what the heck - it was $300+ cheaper than a new one, and I m sure I ll find a use for it.

<snip>

- bbasiaga


View JayT's profile

JayT

4777 posts in 1674 days


#7 posted 04-20-2016 11:49 AM

Good find, Brian. Three patent dates with a small depth adjuster and low front knob means a type 11.

I agree with Clarkie about just sanding off the paint and there should be rosewood underneath. Someone probably painted the wood in order to identify their planes in a workplace.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View Aidan1211's profile

Aidan1211

189 posts in 289 days


#8 posted 04-20-2016 11:55 AM

The sole indicates a type 11-12. If that’s true the iron is incorrect (no biggy) now on to the “other” patent date where is that located? If it’s on the lateral adjuster it might be a frankenplane again no biggy as long as it seats properly (50% jappaning makes it a user anyway) also look inside the brass knurled depth adjuster does it say anything or is it blank? Do you have a frog adjustment screw on the back of the frog? I agree with the paint removal to see if the tote and knob are rosewood (should be). Keep in mind type studies are a “guide” to put you in the right direction. Stanley had a bad habit of grabbing whatever was laying around that would fit.

-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

756 posts in 1458 days


#9 posted 04-20-2016 12:07 PM

Thanks guys.

The ‘other’ patent date is on the iron itself, right below the ’ Rule and Level Co’ design. It is very faint but seems to be from April of 1910.

The knurled brass knob is blank on the inside. I will have to measure the size and have you guys tell me if it is the big or small one. The lateral adjuster says Stanley on it with no dates. There is a frog adjustment screw.

I will check under the paint. I didn’t look closely but when I had the knob off it looked almost black underneath. A little sandpaper will reveal more.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Aidan1211's profile

Aidan1211

189 posts in 289 days


#10 posted 04-20-2016 12:21 PM

Probably a type 11-12. Kinda sought after in the user market. I typically get a little more for that type era. It will make a great user and isn’t collectable due to the condition so if it were me I’d give it the full spa treatment, that’s what I do on the higher end users I sell. Don’t use sandpaper on the knurl nut get some distilled vinegar after you degrease it and let it sit for an hour ish to soak then take a soft bristle brush to it like a stiff older toothbrush that’ll get it cleaned up nicely. I might be wrong but the iron is most likely from an earlier plane but thats fine as long as there is plenty of life left in it. That specific era of iron is as good as the one that should have been on it. All in all if you didn’t pay much for it you’ll definitely get some great use out of it thus making it a bargain in the end. If you need any tips or tricks on cleaning it or getting it ready for use PM me I’ll help in any way I can.

Robert

-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

756 posts in 1458 days


#11 posted 04-20-2016 12:50 PM

Aid an, I was referring to the painted knob not the brass knob…am I misunderstanding what you intend the vinegar for?

Also, out of curiosity, what iron should have been with this plane?

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Aidan1211's profile

Aidan1211

189 posts in 289 days


#12 posted 04-20-2016 01:02 PM

If memory serves me correct a V Logo Iron, Again no quotes I’m more of a Millers Falls fanatic and don’t have all the type studies memorized by heart on the stanley side. I do sell quite of few Stanleys though so I have to double check the type studies to make sure the buyer is getting whats being advertised. The vinegar was to clean up the brass. Yeah don’t dip the wood in vinegar!!!!! haha. I typically will use vinegar for a very short period on the smaller parts nuts washers that kind of thing it helps loosen the corrosion a little and makes it easier to get the surface super clean but I always follow up the vinegar with dawn dish soap and a tooth brush to keep from over doing it (the acid in vinegar will keep going even if you rinse it off you have to neutralize it and wash it off again my experience)

For getting the paint off the handles I’d use a card scraper and sandpaper gently not a stripper (tends to discolor stuff)

-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

View JayT's profile

JayT

4777 posts in 1674 days


#13 posted 04-20-2016 01:41 PM


Thanks guys.

The other patent date is on the iron itself, right below the Rule and Level Co design. It is very faint but seems to be from April of 1910.

The knurled brass knob is blank on the inside. I will have to measure the size and have you guys tell me if it is the big or small one. The lateral adjuster says Stanley on it with no dates. There is a frog adjustment screw.

- bbasiaga

The depth adjuster knob in the pics is the small one. A type 11 could have had one of two logos on the iron, either the arched Rule & Level, which sounds like what you might have. (This one is my favorite of all the Stanley logos, BTW)

or the V logo

The arched logos are on the earlier production type 11’s and the V logo on the later ones.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View Aidan1211's profile

Aidan1211

189 posts in 289 days


#14 posted 04-20-2016 01:42 PM

Very Good!!!!

Thanks guys.

The other patent date is on the iron itself, right below the Rule and Level Co design. It is very faint but seems to be from April of 1910.

The knurled brass knob is blank on the inside. I will have to measure the size and have you guys tell me if it is the big or small one. The lateral adjuster says Stanley on it with no dates. There is a frog adjustment screw.

- bbasiaga

The depth adjuster knob in the pics is the small one. A type 11 could have had one of two logos on the iron, either the arched Rule & Level, which sounds like what you might have

or the V logo

The arched logos are on the earlier production type 11 s and the V logo on the later ones.

- JayT


-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

756 posts in 1458 days


#15 posted 04-20-2016 10:01 PM

OK, here is what mine looks like. Has a patent date in place of the ‘New Britain Conn’ and ‘USA’ lines. I looked at the rexmill site, but didn’t see an example that looked like that.

 photo 4515bd9e-3d44-44e3-9385-dc8ca4298ac9_zpsgw30zei6.jpg

Also, the handles are black underneath. I worked a small spot, and it seems to stay black. I could do more I suppose. Did they ever make handles from bakelite or anything like that? I suppose it could be a later black painted handle that was painted over red, and I just didn’t scrape hard enough to get to bare wood.

 photo 20160420_162638_zpsje93bfvz.jpg

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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