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Shapton professional on glass??

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Forum topic by PaBull posted 04-19-2016 03:03 PM 527 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PaBull

952 posts in 3131 days


04-19-2016 03:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shapton water stones on glass 1000 8000

Hallo fellow LJ’s, i was listening to one of the latest FWW podcasts where Matt and Mike talk about the Bob van Dyke sharpening box. The stones used by Bob are the Shaptons, 1000 and 8000.

So in my enthusiasm i ordered the 1000 and the 8000 pro series instead of the ones on glass. Now that i have the stones, can i buy glass 2-3/4×8-1/4 and some-how glue this to the back of my new stones. Put the print on the glass side. I would have the best of all, thicker stones, on glass, at a lower price… right?

The question now is, what glue will hold up in water, and what glass will be strong enough.

Please advise, thanks.

-- rhykenologist and plant grower


10 replies so far

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Aj2

692 posts in 1264 days


#1 posted 04-19-2016 03:52 PM

I used West system epoxy.Id stay away from the cheap 5 mn.
Sav up for a diamond plate to keep them flat and the surface fresh.They do slow down when they get full of metal.
I think you did good getting the pro stones I don’t care much for the the glass series.

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PaBull

952 posts in 3131 days


#2 posted 04-19-2016 03:58 PM

Thanks Aj2, is the G/flex the same stuff?

-- rhykenologist and plant grower

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Aj2

692 posts in 1264 days


#3 posted 04-19-2016 07:58 PM

I’m not sure what G flex is I goggled fu it and got a cell phone page.
The only reason for glueing a piece of glass was to keep them from breaking when they get thin.It kinda helped to hold them flat between sharpening sessions.But they still will need to be dressed flat.
I sharpen a lot and I think I go at least a year before I start adding glass.
I’ve broken two of the cream colored polishing stones in half.But it’s well worth the trouble guleing it back together such a nice stone.

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PaBull

952 posts in 3131 days


#4 posted 04-19-2016 08:09 PM

I found the G/flex on EBAY, along side the West System. Smaller quantities, less $.

Now how about the glass, can I use any 1/4 thick glass?

Thanks for your input.

-- rhykenologist and plant grower

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Aj2

692 posts in 1264 days


#5 posted 04-20-2016 01:53 AM

Oh yeah I think any 1/4 piece of glass.If your interested I can take a pic of my set up tommorow.Im home sic for the week so I have lots of time.Glad to help.

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Kelly

1114 posts in 2410 days


#6 posted 04-20-2016 02:32 AM

To keep my stones flat, I just bought the carbide grit. It’s cheap, and can be used over and over.

Would aluminum work? I make my own blanks for my Edge Pro from scrap aluminum I pick up. It’s easy to cut and such.

I glue everything from wet stones to the blanks to sandpaper and leather.

For the sandpaper, I just use the glue sticks, since it’ll get change out more often. It holds up surprisingly well.

For leather, from old belts and such, that I use with McGuies Mag polish, chromium oxide or buff compounds, whether Flex gold stuff or Harbor Freight compounds, I use epoxy or contact (3-M spray, last time).

Experiment. Glass is cheap or free and cuts [and sands] easy.

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#7 posted 04-20-2016 12:15 PM


Now how about the glass, can I use any 1/4 thick glass?

Don’t assume all glass is flat.

More reliable would be a piece of granite or even melamine PB.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Kelly

1114 posts in 2410 days


#8 posted 04-20-2016 02:07 PM

Is any glass he finds going to be out enough to be of any concern for this use? We’re talking small pieces, so ….

For my granite, I have hunks I picked up from granite places, out of their granite trash piles (free). It’s perfect for the flattening of stones. I could even drop a piece and it’d probably survive, since it’s over an inch thick, unless you go for tile, instead, which will work too, but is only around a half inch thick.

As to the thickness, there is no reason you can’t use thicker, unless weight is a concern. Using something like an Edge Pro, you have to compensate for the thickness of mounting plates. However, that applies to stones too, since they throw off the angle, when switching from stone to stone, either because they wear or the manufacturer builds to different standards. That’s not an issue here.

If you are just riding on the glass or stone, as with one of those jigs for sharpening chisels, it wouldn’t matter how thick the base was. It could be an inch or a foot and it’d work.

__
If you do want some carbide for flattening stones, you can purchase it from many sources. It made quick work of several stones I have.

A little bit goes a long ways. Too, it’ll work whatever you are using to support it, so have another pieces of glass or granite for that purpose.

Here is one source of sixty grit for about ten bucks:

http://www.amazon.com/Edge-Pro-Pound-Silicon-Carbide/dp/B00QLBATMQ

This is the Edge Pro set up, if money is no object, or you want to see how his setup is done:

http://www.edgeproinc.com/Stone-Leveling-kit-p36.html

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PaBull

952 posts in 3131 days


#9 posted 04-20-2016 02:24 PM

Thanks Kelly, but ultimately my plan is to reduce my sharpening station from a cabinet to a box, like the one from Bob van Dyke, FWW. so I Do like to reduce quantity of items and size of the items.

I will stick with the glass as a base for my new Shapton 1000 and 8000 stones.

I don’t think I like the powder for flattening, i will save up for a diamond flattening stone.

rwe2156, i think the little pc’s of glass i will be using will be flat enough, but i will check ones i get the glass, a friend mine is getting me.

-- rhykenologist and plant grower

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Kelly

1114 posts in 2410 days


#10 posted 04-20-2016 04:12 PM

Whatever you do, keep in mind, it’s fair game to experiment. I was doing what they now call Scary Sharp LONG before the name existed. Interestingly, experts told me I couldn’t [and get good results], but, like in a lot of instances, experts aren’t always right, or as expert as they believe themselves. There are many things they haven’t tried, but will nay say anyway.

The diamond won’t give significant gains in efficiency of flattening small stones, but it’ll be a darn site cleaner.

Finally, and looking at the picture, any amount the glass is off, if any, may happen with free hand errors. No?

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