LumberJocks

hide glue for bucher block counters

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by Pabs posted 04-18-2016 04:55 PM 586 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Pabs's profile

Pabs

196 posts in 2919 days


04-18-2016 04:55 PM

Hi all

I’m in the process of re-purposing some hardwood into new butcher block counter tops and was wondering on the type of glue to use
a while back I had seen something online that pointed in the direction of using hide glue due to its non toxic nature.

now…while these counters will be butcher block type I won’t actually cut on them.. food will come in contact of course but I won’t be cutting though them.

couple of questions I guess…based on that, do I even need to worry if the glue is non toxic or could I go with Titebond let’s say?

and if I do go the route of hide glue, is that a good glue for this type of project.. I like the idea of non toxic anyway but I just want to make sure I won’t find myself dealing with a disaster down the line

thanks

Pabs

-- Pabs


14 replies so far

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7173 posts in 2263 days


#1 posted 04-18-2016 05:02 PM

Are you going to finish the counter top?
If so it is the finish you should be looking at, not the glue.
Hide glue will be as strong as any other you might use and unless it is soaked regularly with hot water it will be fine and if there is a good finish on top it should never even get wet.
If you are looking for a good non-toxic finish, have a look at Tried and True products. Lee Valley has them.
On the other hand, most modern finishes, once cured are pretty inert.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Aidan1211's profile

Aidan1211

189 posts in 291 days


#2 posted 04-18-2016 05:27 PM

NOOOOOOOO! Hide glue doesn’t play well with moisture! Use Titebond III Brand for anything you are worried will come in contact with water if you don’t think it will come in contact with water a lot or you are using a lighter colored wood use Titebond II. They are awesome glues and work in 99% of all typical woodworking applications. Hide glue is great for restoration projects or reproduction work but the chemistry is waaaaaay out dated. My two cents. BTW I am a hand tool woodworker and will typically use the older techniques over modern but in this case the science in the modern glues make them far superior to the older glues.

-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

View SASmith               's profile

SASmith

1850 posts in 2452 days


#3 posted 04-18-2016 05:30 PM

I would vote no on the hide glue, especially if you have a dishwasher under the counter top.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

196 posts in 2919 days


#4 posted 04-18-2016 05:30 PM

finish, well, again…I was airing on the side of non toxic finishes..
beeswax or mineral oil…even read about mixing the two for superior finish.

as far as I understood for the hide glue and water you would need to soak it a long time and apply lots of heat before it would come undone.. that’s what I understood

-- Pabs

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

196 posts in 2919 days


#5 posted 04-18-2016 05:34 PM

Lee Valley sells this
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=51099&cat=1,110,42965

they say this
“It is FDA approved for indirect food contact, such as cutting boards or serving platters. “

they consider cutting boards indirect ? what would be considered direct food contact? I mean you cut on the board exposing the glues lines eventually, seems pretty direct to me

-- Pabs

View Pezking7p's profile

Pezking7p

3097 posts in 1116 days


#6 posted 04-18-2016 05:36 PM

No to hide glue. Even if it’s not supposed to get wet, in a kitchen it will get wet no matter what some day. Use tite bond.

-- -Dan

View BethFraser's profile

BethFraser

11 posts in 281 days


#7 posted 04-18-2016 05:39 PM

This finish is supposed to be non toxic. I have used it and love it. Pure tung oil

http://www.realmilkpaint.com/products/oils/tung-oil-wood-finishes/

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

196 posts in 2919 days


#8 posted 04-18-2016 05:43 PM



This finish is supposed to be non toxic. I have used it and love it. Pure tung oil

http://www.realmilkpaint.com/products/oils/tung-oil-wood-finishes/

- BethFraser

I’ve used Tung oil (100% pure, not the stuff they sell at home depot) and love it as well.
only concern I read was that people with nut allergies may react to it. someone close to me has a son with nut allergies so would hate to make him ill.. that’s why I was going with the beeswax/min oil combo

-- Pabs

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

196 posts in 2919 days


#9 posted 04-18-2016 06:32 PM

humm…this is interesting. just read this regarding the oil and links to allergies

https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/get-more/tung-oil-debunking-myths

-- Pabs

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7173 posts in 2263 days


#10 posted 04-18-2016 07:32 PM

Tried and True finishes are good and so would hide glue be …. but I won’t argue about it.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Aidan1211's profile

Aidan1211

189 posts in 291 days


#11 posted 04-18-2016 07:39 PM

Oils are very natural in their pure form (some so natural you could drink them not that I recommend that you might end up with a pretty bad case of the trots). I usually finish all my projects with BLO as the initial coat you wouldn’t believe the depth it gives the final finish. As far as being food safe there are hundreds of different finishes out there and most people think way to far into what will “contaminate” their food, Once your finish is “flashed off” (some finishes) or cured (different from drying) there would not likely be a contamination issue. Remember if its for a customer if you use something that requires a lot of maintenance to keep it looking new they will likely tell others your work is subpar just because they don’t really understand what we as woodworkers do. That is unless you take the time to actually educate them which should be done as a “good practice” anyway. When choosing as finish ask yourself a lot of questions as if you were the final recipient like how much work do I want to put in to keep this looking nice? How much will I be exposing my new Product to elements that it reacts to like water or chemicals (remember some foods have acids naturally occurring in them like tomatoes)? Is my new top or piece going to have a lot of UV exposure and am I ok with having the color change with age? How much wear is this new surface going to have on it? These questions will make things a little easier to help you choose the proper finish for the right job. Also keep in mind some finishes are relatively new to the woodworking world (less than 40 years out of the thousands of years people have been creating furniture and wooden appliances) and are more marketing hype than actual results so choose based on experience not what the internet and magazines tell you is the finish for your particular job or application.

-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#12 posted 04-18-2016 07:49 PM

In a word:
NOOOOOOO!
You will not be successful.
BTW, no can be a kind word used to keep you from being…...........................well, CRAPPED OUT!!
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Aidan1211's profile

Aidan1211

189 posts in 291 days


#13 posted 04-19-2016 03:22 AM

Wise as always Bill!!!
Say it like it is!


In a word:
NOOOOOOO!
You will not be successful.
BTW, no can be a kind word used to keep you from being…...........................well, CRAPPED OUT!!
Bill

- Bill White


-- its better to plan on the task at hand than actually doing it........ You look smarter.

View mokodj's profile

mokodj

11 posts in 233 days


#14 posted 04-19-2016 09:16 AM

removed

-- spammer in process of being removed

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com