LumberJocks

bench top plank joins

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by rmh09 posted 04-17-2016 04:32 AM 463 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View rmh09's profile

rmh09

12 posts in 2149 days


04-17-2016 04:32 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Long time lurker, first time poster I am making my first “real” workbench. I have read quite a few of the posts about this topic but have not seen this question. I am using 3qty, 60” x 8-10” x 2.75” white oak planks (very heavy). I have good tools (10” joiner, DeWalt 735, Grizzly table saw, and more) but not much experience. Can I mill these planks on three sides and then join them by inserting 4-5 1.5” x 6”(3” into each side of join) dowels and gluing them up? My first thought when I bought the planks was that I would need to slice them in three pieces from each plank, mill them and then join them. But…that seems like a LOT of work with very heavy wood. So I’m hoping this shorter process might work. Thanks for your thoughts!! Randy

-- Randy


5 replies so far

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2319 days


#1 posted 04-17-2016 04:52 AM

If you will be satisfied with the top being approximately 2.5 inches thick then mill each of the three boards, jointing the two edges of each and planing the two faces. Then simply glue the boards together using good glue and clamps. No dowels needed. The glued up joints if done properly will be stronger than the wood itself.

Good Luck!

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7905 posts in 1840 days


#2 posted 04-17-2016 03:46 PM

Agree with Herb.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View rmh09's profile

rmh09

12 posts in 2149 days


#3 posted 04-18-2016 01:37 PM

Thank you for the replies!
Lacking experience…I really didn’t think that a straightforward glue-up would be strong enough.

-- Randy

View iminmyshop's profile

iminmyshop

258 posts in 1454 days


#4 posted 04-18-2016 01:47 PM

The glue joint, with properly milled boards will be stronger than the wood itself. The things you will have to watch out for is that the wood is properly dried, properly milled and the grain is running in the right direction. Rift sawn or quartersawn boards should be used. Plainsawn boards will look pretty but will likely warp over time. Google and read some articles on how to read wood grain. It will save you a ton of aggravation in your woodworking. Learn how wood moves naturally with changes in humidity and that movement is not a problem if you learn to work with it. You cannot fight it. The wood wins every time. So use it to your advantage.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#5 posted 04-18-2016 03:40 PM



The glue joint, with properly milled boards will be stronger than the wood itself. The things you will have to watch out for is that the wood is properly dried, properly milled and the grain is running in the right direction. Rift sawn or quartersawn boards should be used. Plainsawn boards will look pretty but will likely warp over time. Google and read some articles on how to read wood grain. It will save you a ton of aggravation in your woodworking. Learn how wood moves naturally with changes in humidity and that movement is not a problem if you learn to work with it. You cannot fight it. The wood wins every time. So use it to your advantage.

- iminmyshop

Excellent points about grain direction, especially oak. With WO, especially 1/4 sawn, the grain direction can switch in a matter of a few inches, plus it can be extremely hard to read. Sometimes you have to put a plane to it (carefully) to see and just orient the majority of the grain one way or another (fun fun).

If it were me, I would rip the boards in 1/2, turn them up on edge and glue up 1/2 the top at a time so you can run it through the planer to clean it up. Then glue the two halves together. You should end up with a between 3 – 3 1/4” thick and 24” wide. After ripping, be sure to sticker and allow at least a week to acclimate, then rejoint. If you do it like you are talking, as mentioned, movement has to be the #1 consideration especially if it won’t be in a climate controlled shop. A stable top requires less reflattening in the future.

If you go flat sawn you will loose at least 1/8” in the flattening process depending on how flat and true the boards are. Its very possible you could end up with a 2 1/2” thick top when you’re done, but that will be fine.

Couple other points:

Build the base with heavy wood, like 4×4 with stretchers and mortise and tenon joints.
A set of winding sticks and a #7-8 plane will get the finish up the top.

Good luck!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com