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Prepping, maintaining granite tops

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Forum topic by Jon Canfield posted 03-22-2010 03:11 AM 1625 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jon Canfield

6 posts in 2491 days


03-22-2010 03:11 AM

Hi all -

First, thanks for the very warm welcome from many of you, greatly appreciated.

Now, my first question. I recently bought a Craftsman 22116 hybrid table saw with the granite top. I’ve just about finished putting it all together and want to clean up the top. I know many people recommend WD-40 for cast iron tops, would this be a good option for the granite as well?

What about after care – wax (Johnson paste) or other treatment?

Thanks in advance,
Jon

-- Current skill level: wood butcher


10 replies so far

View iamwelty's profile

iamwelty

254 posts in 2583 days


#1 posted 03-22-2010 01:35 PM

Don’t think WD-40 is appropriate. I use Johnson paste wax, works great!

-- There is a fine line between eroticism and nausea...

View Jon Canfield's profile

Jon Canfield

6 posts in 2491 days


#2 posted 03-23-2010 07:21 AM

Thanks – I noticed someone on the Ridgid forum had used a stone cleaner with good luck. I’m just wanting to get the shipping gunk off before waxing – there isn’t much, but I’m interested in getting the best start possible.

Thanks for confirming the Johnson!

Jon

-- Current skill level: wood butcher

View iamwelty's profile

iamwelty

254 posts in 2583 days


#3 posted 03-23-2010 02:21 PM

You’ll love the saw…. Good luck… I used a generic spray cleaner, worked good…

-- There is a fine line between eroticism and nausea...

View PaulfromVictor's profile

PaulfromVictor

224 posts in 2812 days


#4 posted 03-23-2010 04:00 PM

Jon.

Good luck with the granite. Granite is great! Don’t use WD-40. Just clean it. Use soapy water if that will work. It is granite, and you should not need to do any maintenance other than just cleaning it periodically with a wet rag. If you get something (glue, etc) on it, scrape it with a razor. Granit should last forever as long as you don’t hit it with something that cracks it.

Somebody on a previous thread indicated that vibrations could cause it to crack. I could see that being true if it is bolted down, but only time will tell.

Otherwise is should stay perfectly flat and withstand plenty of abuse without needing maintenance.

View Jon Canfield's profile

Jon Canfield

6 posts in 2491 days


#5 posted 03-23-2010 04:38 PM

Great, thanks everyone. I have it on a Rockler mobile base – I wish I had the space to think about bolting it down!

Jon

-- Current skill level: wood butcher

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PaulfromVictor

224 posts in 2812 days


#6 posted 03-23-2010 05:24 PM

I did not mean the base bolted down, I meant the granite bolted or glued to a vibrating machine. Because the granite is so rigid, locking it in place and vibrating it could create a crack.

Don’t get overly concerned – that is only an issue that somebody presented as a potential problem. It was probably a design consideration when they made the saw. I have not heard of any serious issues regarding that. I would buy a granite tool without hesitation. In fact, when I upgrade my jointer, I will see what granite options are on the market.

View 1yeldud1's profile

1yeldud1

301 posts in 2509 days


#7 posted 03-24-2010 01:07 AM

Having worked with granite surface plates for the past 33 years I can attest that they are fairly care free. I would try NOT to clean the surface plate with water based products as the granite tends to “hold” a fair amount of this moisture. While this moisture won’t hurt the granite, if you were to leave a cast Iiron or steel tool laying on this surface after cleaning they will be prone to rusting. On the granite surface plates that I use I wipe any large loose particles off with a clean rag and then I use a alcohol based cleaner (or straight alcohol) on several kleenex to wipe the surface down. On most granite surface plates we construct a wooden “cover” to protect the surface in case someone decides to store something on their working surface – this could be a wise addition to help protect a granite table saw table.

View Ingjr's profile

Ingjr

144 posts in 2483 days


#8 posted 03-24-2010 03:29 AM

I use Renissance wax on my Ridgid granite top. Couple of thin coats and wood just glides across the top. Expensive stuff but it goes a long way.

-- The older I get the faster I was.

View 1yeldud1's profile

1yeldud1

301 posts in 2509 days


#9 posted 03-24-2010 03:49 AM

Wax wont hurt the granite – It would be a good idea to put a llevel on the new saw and to try to keep it as level as possible – believe it or not granite can actually twist and sag over time !!!

View Jon Canfield's profile

Jon Canfield

6 posts in 2491 days


#10 posted 03-24-2010 04:13 AM

I use the Renaissance wax on some of my photo prints – it isn’t cheap, but you’re right, it is good stuff. I do have the saw leveled on the base where it’s used, so I should be good there. Hopefully, I’ll get my first test cuts in tomorrow.

-- Current skill level: wood butcher

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