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drum sander questions

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Forum topic by skidiot posted 04-17-2016 12:50 AM 578 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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skidiot

58 posts in 3106 days


04-17-2016 12:50 AM

I am thinking of investing in a drum sander. i primarily used quarter sawn oak. I have a lot of trouble with tearout on the planer. A friend suggested using a drum sander for thicknessing. I can get one side flat and smooth with my jointer with the carbide helical head. Will a drum sander flatten and thickness like a planer? Also, can you run a door frame though a drum sander? Two of the boards will be going across the grain. These may be “duh” questions to most, but I have only just started investigating the use of a drum sander
Thanks
JW

-- skidiot northern illinois


8 replies so far

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shipwright

7165 posts in 2259 days


#1 posted 04-17-2016 12:58 AM

Yes and yes but you will have to deal with the cross grain scratches.

Drum sanders are great tools. I have one big commercial dual drum machine and one smaller shop made one. They work equally well but if you plan on having a coarse enough paper to “thickness” with, you will be needing to do some serious sanding afterward. If you have a fine enough paper it will take many passes to even out thicknesses.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1907 days


#2 posted 04-17-2016 01:57 AM



you will be needing to do some serious sanding afterward. If you have a fine enough paper it will take many passes to even out thicknesses.

- shipwright


That’s exactly right.
A drum sander could be used for thicknessing but it will take at least 5 times longer to do the same job as a planer , with a drum sander you’re limited to take a few thou (at a time) off the surface.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View skidiot's profile

skidiot

58 posts in 3106 days


#3 posted 04-17-2016 05:37 AM

Ya, Im sure it will be slower, but as long as I get usable material when Im done. Using the planer all I end up with is junk. Its just an idea right now. Another question…does a sander create “snipe” like a planer? That also drives me nuts.
JW

-- skidiot northern illinois

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1077 posts in 3003 days


#4 posted 04-17-2016 06:11 AM


Ya, Im sure it will be slower, but as long as I get usable material when Im done. Using the planer all I end up with is junk. Its just an idea right now. Another question…does a sander create “snipe” like a planer? That also drives me nuts.
JW

- skidiot

Should not if you have it adjusted correctly. I’ve had a Profomax 22-44 since 1994 and have no snipe with it. I don’t know the set-up on your sander but mine has an in feed and out feed rollers on it. When I first got it I had some snipe and loosened up on those and the snipe went away. Never had anymore snipe since then.

You have to remember too that it’s a sander not a planer and take only lite passes with it.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2409 posts in 2383 days


#5 posted 04-17-2016 09:34 PM

A properly adjusted planer should not give you snipe. Same with a drum sander. Drum sander will be a TON slower than a planer is, especially with hardwoods. Tear out from a planer when working quarter sawn oak sounds like dull blades or too deep a cut to me.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

131 posts in 277 days


#6 posted 04-18-2016 12:29 AM

I typically take off about 0.025” with each pass of my drum sander. That is 5 passes to take off 1/8 inch. You have to run the conveyor very slow or the overcurrent sensor will trip.

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

56 posts in 705 days


#7 posted 04-18-2016 02:51 AM

I love my 16-32 Performax and it works great on red oak, have not tried any white. In some respects it actually works better on oak than softer woods like pine and cypress because of the resin that causes them to burn and clog the belt.
If you don’t use a real course grit cleaning up the cross grain on the doors is not to big of a deal. What is a big deal is quality abrasives. I like Klingspore premarked bulk belts, more bang for the buck.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

827 posts in 683 days


#8 posted 04-18-2016 04:14 PM

As others have said, you can get snipe unless you correctly adjust both the machine and your technique. To eliminate snipe on my 16/32, I greatly relieved the outside roller tension. A planer will force a bowed board flat before surfacing and a typical drum sander won’t (at least not nearly as much since the rollers are not as strong).
With a drum sander, if what goes in is not bowed, what comes out will also not be bowed, otherwise you will be chasing your tail unless you take special measures.

I always resigned all parts with a ROS after passing through the drum sander (it leaves linear scratches that are really visible). Typically I’ll resend with a grit that is twice (numerically) the grit used on the drum sander.
For example, if my final drum sander pass is with 220, I’l resand with a ROS and 120 grit. Anything coarser on the drum sander as a final pass ant the first ROS pass is with 100.

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