LumberJocks

Sanding existing door trim

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by rweitz posted 1584 days ago 3399 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View rweitz's profile

rweitz

89 posts in 1673 days


1584 days ago

I’d got the word from the boss the next project is sanding all the interior doors and trim and repainting. We had the carpet out a while ago to show off the existing hardwoods and you can still see the old paint at the bottom of the doors and they need painting in general:

Photobucket

Is this all hand sanding or is there a tool that can sand this kind of rounded over notched area. I have 8 of these doors and trims to work on and I’d like to have some hands left when we get done.
Also the bottom of all the doors is about 1” short of the floor. Is there a good way to add that bottom back and not see the joint line?

More pics:

Photobucket

-- You cannot build a reputation on what you are going to do. - Henry Ford


8 replies so far

View interpim's profile

interpim

1123 posts in 2054 days


#1 posted 1584 days ago

If it were me, I would probably rip all the trim down and replace it with new stuff…

-- San Diego, CA

View Timberwerks's profile

Timberwerks

301 posts in 1756 days


#2 posted 1584 days ago

Since it’s standard ranch casing you may consider replacing it. It would not be costly to replace and it would save you a lot of sanding time and dust. You could use a scraper on the jambs where the reveal is painted.

-- http://djofurnituremaker.wordpress.com/ & https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

View sphere's profile

sphere

109 posts in 1627 days


#3 posted 1584 days ago

Cheaper to replace than to strip all that.

I have never seen an acceptable door bottom ext. added on, it just ain’t right.

-- Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Wood Works

View Michael Murphy's profile

Michael Murphy

448 posts in 1601 days


#4 posted 1584 days ago

You’re going to repaint? If it’s not rotten, either use a scraper or just lightly sand it, fill the holes and sand it again, and repaint.

Protools (Ithink that was the name) used to make handled scrapers that were different shapes or you could shape them yourself. I used to use them alot in situations like this. I actually got them at my favorite paint store. You one with the handle and buy get different shape interchangeable scraper blades.

-- Michael Murphy, Woodland, CA.

View rweitz's profile

rweitz

89 posts in 1673 days


#5 posted 1583 days ago

I’ll look into replacing the trim, the boss is on saving money, so we may be up against a cash flow problem to just replace it. Yes the dust issue is dreadful. Maybe I’ll invent some kind of “hand sanding dust collection” by duct taping the nozzle to my wrist!

-- You cannot build a reputation on what you are going to do. - Henry Ford

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51451 posts in 2076 days


#6 posted 1583 days ago

If you decide to refinish it, use a profile sander…it will speed up the work a lot.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View David's profile

David

110 posts in 1943 days


#7 posted 1583 days ago

I just re-sanded all the trim in my living room as there were multiple years of old paint that had cracked and dripped along the way. I used 80 grit sandpaper and did it by hand along with a scraper and then filled it the holes with drywall mud. It was a pain and would have been much much easier to replace the trim, but the trim is really intricate in my house so a match would not have been possible. It turned out pretty good, but its nearly impossible to get the trim looking like new again after years of abuse. It was a lot of mind numbing work that could have been spent on much more enjoyable projects.

Long story short, I agree with those that suggest replacing the trim – especially since you have standard casing that can be bought cheaply at a big box retailer. It will save you a ton of time and headache.

-- dcutter

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1702 days


#8 posted 1583 days ago

You might look at the sponge sanding blocks. They will conform to thet curved surface and they are cheap.
I get mine at good ole Harbor Freight. The last time I bought them on sale for about 3 bucks for 10 of them.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase