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Cast iron fragileness question

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Forum topic by Marn64 posted 04-16-2016 02:24 PM 521 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marn64

209 posts in 247 days


04-16-2016 02:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane question

As of late, I have been collecting several old Stanleys, which are of course, made of cast iron. I am well aware that cast iron shatters when dropped, and I am a bit of a clumsy person. How do you protect your planes? Is there such thing as shock absorbing padding for the floors of the shop?

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee


10 replies so far

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

226 posts in 638 days


#1 posted 04-16-2016 02:55 PM

Sure. There are all kinds of options for rubberized flooring. Foam and rubber Tiles, mats, you name it. Lots of options at various prices depending on your needs and budget. It’s also great for your feet if you stand a lot in your shop.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

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Marn64

209 posts in 247 days


#2 posted 04-16-2016 06:58 PM



Sure. There are all kinds of options for rubberized flooring. Foam and rubber Tiles, mats, you name it. Lots of options at various prices depending on your needs and budget. It s also great for your feet if you stand a lot in your shop.

- onoitsmatt

Thanks, good to know that padding exists, I would hate to see my pre lateral no 7 shatter into a million pieces! Also good to know about the foot and leg health part too.

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

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WillliamMSP

738 posts in 1066 days


#3 posted 04-16-2016 07:04 PM

Do a search for “anti-fatigue mats” – you should find several options at most home improvement stores.

-- Practice makes less sucky. (Bill, Minneapolis, MN)

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WillliamMSP

738 posts in 1066 days


#4 posted 04-16-2016 07:09 PM

Also, have a home for your plane that’s within arms reach. I think that most dropped tools are ones that were set on the bench for “just a second” while using another tool and are then subsequently nudged off, on to the floor.

-- Practice makes less sucky. (Bill, Minneapolis, MN)

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2447 days


#5 posted 04-16-2016 07:14 PM

Horse stall mats are used by many for both anti-fatigue and shock absorbing. Sold at places like Tractor Supply or other, they are also cheaper per square foot than many anti-fatigue mats.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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splatman

558 posts in 861 days


#6 posted 04-16-2016 07:33 PM

Another contender is sports flooring, used in weightlifting rooms and the like. Made to take a beating. No idea what it costs, though. Horse stall mats may still be cheaper.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#7 posted 04-16-2016 07:49 PM

Places that sell sporting goods/exercise equipment, like Sports Authority sell the interlocking exercise mats pretty cheap, particularly when they go on sale. Or you can get sets of them (6 mats, 12 borders) for about $20 at places like Amazon, Walmart or even HF.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Tim's profile

Tim

3112 posts in 1423 days


#8 posted 04-17-2016 01:57 AM

Agree with the above, I’ve just been lazy I guess in getting some mats for my shop. Also I’ve dropped a vintage plane a few times on concrete and haven’t had one break, so it’s not that they’re like glass or something. But I’ve seen a lot of broken vintage planes so it certainly happens. Murphy says the pre-lateral would be the first to shatter.

View Marn64's profile

Marn64

209 posts in 247 days


#9 posted 04-17-2016 05:18 PM

Thanks for the responses everyone!

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

View Loren's profile

Loren

8301 posts in 3110 days


#10 posted 04-17-2016 07:02 PM

Having a mat or wood in front of your bench is
a good idea. I dropped a Stanley spokeshave once
on concrete and it broke. Older iron piece. The
newer ones are tougher iron but there’s still the
same weak spot in the design at the edge of the
mouth.

I’ve dropped planes on concrete a few times and
been lucky so far. Mats can be tricky to keep
clean, I’d prefer a nicely flat-fastened wood-stuff
panel of some sort I think. Mats don’t get ruined
by floor flooding, if that can be an issue for your
shop.

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