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Should I modify this veneer scraper?

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Forum topic by Purrmaster posted 04-16-2016 03:04 AM 998 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Purrmaster

914 posts in 1554 days


04-16-2016 03:04 AM

I just got this veneer scraper at Woodcraft: http://www.woodcraft.com/product/153634/veneer-scraper.aspx

The blue one.

It says it can be used right away but the edges on it look kind of sharp and I’m concerned about cutting up the veneer. Should I sand it a bit to round off the rough edges or should I leave it the way it is?

Thanks.


20 replies so far

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7167 posts in 2259 days


#1 posted 04-16-2016 04:19 AM

What on earth are you using for glue? Contact cement?
Veneer should be pressed or hammered.
..... just my opinion…

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#2 posted 04-16-2016 05:09 AM


What on earth are you using for glue? Contact cement?
Veneer should be pressed or hammered.
..... just my opinion…

That’s the type of scraper you use with peel and stick veneer. Often used in cabinet re-facing.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Purrmaster

914 posts in 1554 days


#3 posted 04-16-2016 05:10 AM

Yes, contact cement. I am experimenting with veneering for the first time. I tried a j roller and it didn’t seem to work well. So I got the scraper.

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jerryminer

528 posts in 903 days


#4 posted 04-16-2016 06:26 AM

I have a similar tool. I rounded off the sharp edges with sandpaper and like it that way.

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shipwright

7167 posts in 2259 days


#5 posted 04-16-2016 03:00 PM

OK, understood.
If you get serious about veneering, please don’t use peel and stick or contact cement. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#6 posted 04-16-2016 06:12 PM


OK, understood.
If you get serious about veneering, please don t use peel and stick or contact cement. :-)

- shipwright


Instead of just saying don’t use xyz tell us why. What’s your experience with P&S . Did you have problems with it?

I use P&S veneer from time to time in cabinet making and I’ve never had reason to regret it. Properly applied the P&S sticks like crazy and takes the heat when I use the self cleaning feature of the over.

The side panels of my oven and refrigerator cabinet are custom made P&S veneer.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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shipwright

7167 posts in 2259 days


#7 posted 04-16-2016 08:49 PM

Sorry, for large panel veneering like that and for thinks like kitchen cabinets I can see using it.
For furniture that you want to last I just don’t think it is the best.
As a general rule I prefer hard drying glues , either animal protein or urea formaldehyde for veneering with the hide glue in first place.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2321 days


#8 posted 04-16-2016 09:15 PM

And if anybody would like to question Paul’s qualifications to talk about veneering techniques and materials, please take a few minutes (ok, a couple of hours…) to review his projects.

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2593 days


#9 posted 04-16-2016 10:14 PM

Rather than that scraper, use a piece of hardwood, about 2’ long, and 3/4”x2”. Round off all the corners.
With the 2ft of length, you can get a lot of leverage and apply a lot of pressure.

Make sure the contact cement is very dry before you stick the veneer, for best results.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#10 posted 04-17-2016 12:21 AM


And if anybody would like to question Paul s qualifications to talk about veneering techniques and materials, please take a few minutes (ok, a couple of hours…) to review his projects.

Herb


Herb
I’m not questioning anybody’s qualifications. I just like a reason for things.

If my financial advisor said “don’t put in money in Microsoft” I would respond “why”......not just OK.

Does that make any sense?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2593 days


#11 posted 04-17-2016 01:46 PM



I m not questioning anybody s qualifications. I just like a reason for things.

Contact cement and peel and stick do not result in a rigid glue line. This allows the veneer to shrink and expand with changes in humidity.
Over time, this can often result in an un-smooth surface, with ripples or even bubbles if the veneer comes loose.
With thick gloss finishes, cracks in the finish are also a possibility.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3661 posts in 1727 days


#12 posted 04-17-2016 02:26 PM

Thanks for all this info on veneering. Please add more. It’s something I’ve been avoiding for lack of knowledge and experience but have wanted to try.

View Purrmaster's profile

Purrmaster

914 posts in 1554 days


#13 posted 04-18-2016 05:19 AM

Thank you for the information! Please keep it coming.

The contact cement should be dry before slapping the pieces together? If the contact cement is fully dry won’t it lose its adhesion ability?

What other kinds of glues are viable? I considered using wood glue but I’m not sure it’s a good idea to use a water based glue for this. I thought the problem with hide glue is that it’s kind of weak and not at all water resistant?

I thought of possibly trying to use super glue but for anything even remotely large that would be prohibitively expensive and probably cure too fast.

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jerryminer

528 posts in 903 days


#14 posted 04-18-2016 07:10 AM



The contact cement should be dry before slapping the pieces together?
- Purrmaster

Yes, let it dry completely (read the label!)—that’s the way contact cement works: apply to both surfaces, let dry, then make contact and press together.

But as Paul says above, hot hide glue is better for most applications. What’s your project?

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shipwright

7167 posts in 2259 days


#15 posted 04-18-2016 02:27 PM

There are several PVA type glues available specifically for veneering. Many people use them and are happy with them but for my money you would be far better off in the long run with a quality liquid hide glue and when I say quality
I mean Old Brown Glue. It won’t creep ti won’t retract or bulge over time in the glue lines, it won’t block your finishes, it is reversible if you make a mistake and on and on.
One slip with contact cement and you are buying a new batch of veneer.
Hide glue is as strong as or stronger than pva glues. It is water resistant but not waterproof.

If you want to understand hide glues here’s a little primer. Hide Glue for Beginners

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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