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Forum topic by TheLorax posted 04-15-2016 06:32 PM 439 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheLorax

41 posts in 700 days


04-15-2016 06:32 PM

I want to build a traditional work bench in the Sellers style and I was given a bunch of rough cut red oak 2×4s. I don’t have a jointer and I wanted some opinions on the best way to go about it. Or if it’s even worth trying.
What I do have that could be used to do the job: Fixed base router, no 4 plane, small dewalt table saw.

I’m thinking of making a jig to use on the table saw to joint them. I think it will work well for edge jointing but I’m not so sure about face jointing? Opinions? Should I forget it and buy framing lumber to start with?


8 replies so far

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JayT

4777 posts in 1674 days


#1 posted 04-15-2016 06:53 PM

Unless the lumber is really out of whack, you can surface them with the #4 plane and get them close enough to straight to be able to clamp them up into a workbench. Have you watched the Paul Sellers video series of him building a bench using mostly a #4? It’ll take a bit more work on oak versus construction lumber, but can still be done.

Alternatively, a router sled or table saw jig could be built to joint them straight. Free is always good for a workbench, so I wouldn’t go out and by more lumber. Nothing wrong with a bench of construction lumber (mine is) but a oak bench will be heavier and stiffer.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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TheLorax

41 posts in 700 days


#2 posted 04-15-2016 06:55 PM

Some of them are a little warped. They are 104” long so I’m going to attempt to cut out as much of the warpage as possible for my intended 6’ finished length. I have watched all his videos on the bench build. I suppose my question is more along the lines of…. Is it psychotic to attempt it with the no 4 or should I attempt to build a table saw jig? They aren’t super out of square but they also aren’t as square as framing lumber like Sellers used in his video.

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JayT

4777 posts in 1674 days


#3 posted 04-15-2016 07:09 PM

Personally, I’d do it with the plane before trying to work 2in thick oak on a jobsite table saw. While having a jack &/or jointer plane (#5, 5-1/2, 6 or 7) would be helpful, I don’t know any reason you can’t do it all with a #4. Just have to take your time and double check straight more often, as the shorter sole on the plane won’t help to keep you as straight as a longer one.

As long as you can get the lumber square enough to glue up well, you’ll be fine. You’ll have to flatten the top after you get it all glued up, anyways.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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Richard

1898 posts in 2153 days


#4 posted 04-15-2016 07:09 PM

The methods that Paul used in his video will work just as well with the wood you have. It may take a bit more time with the #4 plane and using the winding sticks to get any warp out but it can be done , and you will get a lot of practice using the plane. Just make sure you get the plane Really sharp first. Just watch Paul’s video on sharpening a hand plane.
I really don’t think that face planning on the table saw would work to good , but I could be wrong. Edge cutting them should be pretty good but you will still need to use the #4 on them unless you have a really good blade and table saw setup.
I am pretty sure that Paul also has a Video on squaring up and straitening rough cut lumber as well , search for it on youtube or check his site.

Found it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cl5Srx-Ru_U

I would go for it if I was you , also keep us posted on your progress and remember , No Pictures it Never Happened :)

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Rick M

7913 posts in 1843 days


#5 posted 04-15-2016 07:23 PM

Use a jig on the tablesaw to ‘joint’ the edges. Glue it up and then use a #5 (or #4 will work too) to plane the top flat. That’s what I did on my small bench and on several tables I’ve built. You’ll feel like a real woodworker when done.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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pintodeluxe

4854 posts in 2276 days


#6 posted 04-15-2016 08:17 PM

Personally, if I didn’t have a jointer and planer that could handle the job, I would take the boards to a cabinet shop or lumber supplier and have them surfaced S3S. Afterall this is a workbench that will be the flat reference surface for everything else you build. Why start with a bowed, crooked, or otherwise uneven surface?

I occasionally hire a large commercial shop in my area to plane large panels for me. The rates are reasonable, and they have saved me lots of labor time.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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TheLorax

41 posts in 700 days


#7 posted 04-15-2016 11:52 PM

Thanks for all the ideas everyone I appreciate it. I love the idea of taking them somewhere but I live in Augusta, Georgia where there aren’t any lumber yards.
I think I’m going to try edge jointing them on the table saw and face jointing them with my no 4. Maybe i’ll watch Ebay for a no 5. I’ll try and post some pics as I go.

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Rick M

7913 posts in 1843 days


#8 posted 04-16-2016 06:23 PM



Why start with a bowed, crooked, or otherwise uneven surface?
- pintodeluxe

We start with crooked and make it straight, that’s what woodworkers do :) But I take your point about having someone flatten it for you, I debated the same but in the end was happy that I did it myself. And it isn’t that hard if you go in order—across the grain until flat, then with the grain to smooth.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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