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Forum topic by wmgworks posted 04-14-2016 03:15 PM 419 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wmgworks

193 posts in 451 days


04-14-2016 03:15 PM

Hey all!

We discovered this lovely hole underneath our sink in the kitchen a few weeks ago.

I’ve decided to tackle the repair myself. Almost hte entire surface is damp so I plan on ripping the whole thing out and replacing the bottom of the cabinet. I have a couple questions, though. First, what material should I use? I am assuming some form of plywood and not this crap again. Second, what kind of sealant should I put on it to protect ifrom leaks and drips that may occur in the future. Third, when I looked at how the base is attached there appear to be no brads, nails, staples or fasteners of any type. I am guessing there is a rabet in the edging and the base is glued to it?

Thanks for any direction you can give me!

-- Butchering wood since 2015


14 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4036 posts in 1817 days


#1 posted 04-14-2016 03:24 PM

Make sure you fix the leak first or any repair will be temporary.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 451 days


#2 posted 04-14-2016 03:26 PM

Yeah it’s fixed. Took care of that a couple weeks ago when we found the leak, and therefore the hole

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View Reaperwoodworks's profile

Reaperwoodworks

94 posts in 401 days


#3 posted 04-14-2016 03:27 PM

Melamine will give you some water resistance in that it will bead up on the surface first. That should be a fun one to tackle! That’s been there for a good while.

-- Website: www.reaperwoodworks.com, Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_ognomZyK6V0VwdokBcixw

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clin

514 posts in 462 days


#4 posted 04-14-2016 03:27 PM

Rip out all the bad stuff, then see what you have to work with.

My guess is that you will have to add some support at the edges for the new bottom. But you’re going to need to see what you have before you decide.

I’d use plywood and put a poly finish on it which is pretty much how a typical cabinet would be made.

Also, while some materials will hold up better than others, nothing made of wood is going to hold up against a constant drip. So be sure to deal with the plumbing issues in the future.

-- Clin

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wmgworks

193 posts in 451 days


#5 posted 04-14-2016 03:34 PM



Melamine will give you some water resistance in that it will bead up on the surface first. That should be a fun one to tackle! That s been there for a good while.

- Reaperwoodworks

Yeah this isn’t the first time we’ve had a problem. First was garbage disposal and then somehow one of hte joints got loose. The first time I found it I blew fans on it for a couple days to dry it out. This stuff is like a sponge though, and obviously needs to be replaced now


Rip out all the bad stuff, then see what you have to work with.

My guess is that you will have to add some support at the edges for the new bottom. But you re going to need to see what you have before you decide.

I d use plywood and put a poly finish on it which is pretty much how a typical cabinet would be made.

Also, while some materials will hold up better than others, nothing made of wood is going to hold up against a constant drip. So be sure to deal with the plumbing issues in the future.

- clin

Thanks for the advice. I’ve been checking under the sink every few days and the leak is now fixed.

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#6 posted 04-14-2016 03:44 PM

Looks like a particle board floor,don’t use that stuff. you can buy one of these or see if you library has a copy.

http://www.thriftbooks.com/w/building-traditional-kitchen-cabinets_jim-tolpin_james-toplin/321517/#isbn=1561580589

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#7 posted 04-14-2016 03:48 PM

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

819 posts in 386 days


#8 posted 04-14-2016 03:55 PM

wmgworks,

My approach would be that described by clin. I would add that applying finish to the edges of the plywood could be added insurance. A bead of caulk might also be helpful.

But when it is all said and done the sink will probably leak again; and these leaks always seem to go unnoticed until the damage is done. While researching kitchen cabinet materials for kitchen cabinets I am building for our kitchen remodel, I ran across a product that addresses these perennial leaks. It is called a Drip Tray. The idea is not so much to catch and retain dripping water, but rather direct it out onto the floor in front of the cabinet where it will be noticed. Here is a link to a vendor. There may be other brands and sizes, but since I have not reached this point in the remodel, I have done no further research.

https://www.thehardwarehut.com/search-product-result.php?searchprodno=drip+tray&searchb=Search

Also a handcrafted custom drip tray could be made from copper sheets and solder, but that would be expensive.

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 451 days


#9 posted 04-14-2016 04:44 PM



even better price here

http://product.half.ebay.com/Building-Traditional-Kitchen-Cabinets-by-Jim-Tolpin-1994-Paperback/717255&tg=info

- a1Jim

Thanks, Jim. I’m only looking to replace the bottom of the cabinet for now, but this will be a great resource when I decide to redo them all.

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 451 days


#10 posted 04-14-2016 04:56 PM



wmgworks,

My approach would be that described by clin. I would add that applying finish to the edges of the plywood could be added insurance. A bead of caulk might also be helpful.

But when it is all said and done the sink will probably leak again; and these leaks always seem to go unnoticed until the damage is done. While researching kitchen cabinet materials for kitchen cabinets I am building for our kitchen remodel, I ran across a product that addresses these perennial leaks. It is called a Drip Tray. The idea is not so much to catch and retain dripping water, but rather direct it out onto the floor in front of the cabinet where it will be noticed. Here is a link to a vendor. There may be other brands and sizes, but since I have not reached this point in the remodel, I have done no further research.

https://www.thehardwarehut.com/search-product-result.php?searchprodno=drip+tray&searchb=Search

Also a handcrafted custom drip tray could be made from copper sheets and solder, but that would be expensive.

- JBrow

Definitely agree it’s not a matter of if but when will there be another leak. I will definitely consider adding a drip tray like this.

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#11 posted 04-14-2016 04:57 PM

The easiest and not necessarily the best approach is to remove the bottom (saw zaw around the edges if necessary)
nail or screw some(PT 2×3s or whatever height wood you need)to the edges of the cabinet and place a piece of 3/4” ply over the cleats,if it’s over a 24”” wide cabinet you may want to also add a block on the bottom of the new cabintet floor in the middle to reduce the possibility of sag. As others have said add a couple of coats of poly will help protect it.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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wmgworks

193 posts in 451 days


#12 posted 04-14-2016 05:00 PM



The easiest and not necessarily the best approach is to remove the bottom (saw zaw around the edges if necessary)
nail or screw some(PT 2×3s or whatever height wood you need)to the edges of the cabinet and place a piece of 3/4” ply over the cleats,if it s over a 24”” wide cabinet you may want to also add a block on the bottom of the new cabintet floor in the middle to reduce the possibility of sag. As others have said add a couple of coats of poly will help protect it.

- a1Jim

Great advice, Jim. The area I am replacing is roughly 34”x58” if memory serves me correctly. I’m seeing the wisdom in ripping out the bottom BEFORE I go and buy my materials to see what i need.

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#13 posted 04-14-2016 05:06 PM

If done that way you could just screw the new floor to the cleats so if you need to replace it down the road you just unscrew it and put in a new piece. Btw you may also be able to cut around the edges with a Multi-tool if you have one.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Gentile's profile

Gentile

262 posts in 1285 days


#14 posted 04-15-2016 01:10 AM

I replaced one with 3/4 plywood, not a top grade sheet
Then a sheet of scrap linoleum flooring on top of that.

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

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