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What is the best temporary corner joint?

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Forum topic by Ripper70 posted 04-13-2016 02:20 PM 522 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ripper70

183 posts in 373 days


04-13-2016 02:20 PM

Hey All,

I’m needing to start a few projects that require sheet goods and am planning on constructing an auxiliary rack for the roof of my SUV to transport said panels from the lumber yard to my home.

I would like to be able to construct the auxiliary rack (pictured below) in such a way that it can be disassembled and easily stored and then reassembled when I need it. My question is, what would be the best way to construct the joints so that this can be conveniently done yet maintain the integrity of the rack system after repeated uses? Any special hardware or joinery techniques that you all would recommend?

Also, the plan calls for using 2” x 4” x 8’ for the main construction, but do you think it’d be okay to use 1” x 4” so that the rack is less bulky and easier for me to handle by myself? I’m always flying solo so I need to be able to wield this thing on my own so I figured cutting down on the extra weight might be beneficial to my back.

Thanks for any suggestions you may have.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo


11 replies so far

View mrg's profile

mrg

659 posts in 2464 days


#1 posted 04-13-2016 02:28 PM

You could use t-nuts. Then you could just bolt and un- bolt as needed. Another option would be pocket screws, but don’t know how many times you would be able to screw and unscrew. Then you could use some angle iron in the corners with holes in the wood and iron and use nuts and bolts.

-- mrg

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waho6o9

7174 posts in 2042 days


#2 posted 04-13-2016 02:42 PM

Threaded inserts

Punched angle iron as mentioned by meg is very effective as well.

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2596 days


#3 posted 04-13-2016 03:44 PM

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DrDirt

4169 posts in 3207 days


#4 posted 04-13-2016 04:05 PM

T-nut similarity – - but these kinds of captured fasteners. I think Gerry had same idea

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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waho6o9

7174 posts in 2042 days


#5 posted 04-13-2016 04:33 PM

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pintodeluxe

4858 posts in 2278 days


#6 posted 04-13-2016 04:59 PM

I think this is the hardware you are looking for…

You might think I’m kidding but I’m not. Mine doesn’t look quite this clean, and the sides are a little taller, but boy has it hauled some lumber. It really saves your back lifting to a low trailer deck, vs. the roof of a car.

Good luck with it!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Ripper70

183 posts in 373 days


#7 posted 04-13-2016 06:45 PM



I think this is the hardware you are looking for…

Thanks for that suggestion, pinto. I actually did consider the trailer option, but, a.) I don’t have a trailer hitch, b.) don’t want to have to deal with the DMV and c.) have absolutely no place to store such a thing.

I like the Lee Valley bedlocks that waho609 offered but it’ll raise the cost of the project by at least $30 bucks or more.

I’m gonna go with the t-nut option and the 1” x 4” frame. I think if I use wood blocks glued and nailed to the cross pieces it’ll give the bolt/t-nut combo something to bite into and, I hope, withstand the test of time. I’ll let you know if it’s a complete failure so as to save anyone else the trial of my mistakes.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#8 posted 04-13-2016 06:50 PM

I would use angle iron screwed permanently to the lateral rails, attached to the longitudinal rails with thumb screws threaded into the angle iron. This should last a very long time.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#9 posted 04-13-2016 08:12 PM

What, no one recommended a tusk tenon? Is this a woodworking site or not! Come on!! :)

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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waho6o9

7174 posts in 2042 days


#10 posted 04-13-2016 08:56 PM

Said tusk and tenon joinery, a good choice:

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2089 days


#11 posted 04-13-2016 09:08 PM

I showered the cross members to the long sides. My roof rack is tubular so I used U bolts to secure the lengthwise 2×4s. So I U bolt one side. Slide the 3 4” dowel into the now fixes side and the put the other side on using a rubber mallet to seat the dowels. Then I U. Lot the other side down. For sheet goods I use C clamps to fix the sheets to the cross members.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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