LumberJocks

Dunlap lathe dead center issue.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Combo Prof posted 04-12-2016 09:17 PM 1229 views 0 times favorited 81 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 741 days


04-12-2016 09:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe question

I have this Dunlap Lathe:

  1. The tail stock has a dead center? How do I replace it with a live center? I tried backing it out by turning the hand crank. I assumed it would pop out, but does not and I cannot turn it further by hand. Do I just give the handle a good hammer wack?
  2. The head stock has a spur center attached to an un-threaded rod via a set screw. How can I replace it with a better chuck?
  3. Should I give up and buy a bench lathe?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)


81 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#1 posted 04-12-2016 09:46 PM

Would be helpful if you knew the model number so the manual could be consulted…

As for your questions. If you can’t eject the dead center by back cranking the spindle (you should be able to), you can always remove the spindle and tap it out. If you advance the spindle all the way, it should disengage the threaded rod and pull out easily.

For the headstock spindle… unless it’s threaded, you might be limited to just face plates and drive spurs. Again, the manual would be informative as to what options you might have.

For your last question – I wouldn’t give up :) Give us some more info and I’m sure you will get lots of creative suggestions on how to make it even more functional than it already is.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 741 days


#2 posted 04-12-2016 10:06 PM

I can’t find the model number anywhere but it looks to me from looking at vintage machinery pictures to be a: 1942/3 Dunlap 9-inch wood-turning lathe, Probably model 101.06242. I’m going to pull the tail stock and get a better look at the situation.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#3 posted 04-12-2016 11:09 PM

I can’t find the model number anywhere but it looks to me from looking at vintage machinery pictures to be a: 1942/3 Dunlap 9-inch wood-turning lathe, Probably model 101.06242.
- Combo Prof

It actually looks more like one of the Atlas lathes (made for Sears under their Dunlap brand) due to the closed tailstock and those cool raised racing stripes :) Measure from the center of the drive spur to the bed ways to determine swing – they had a 9” and and 8” that look almost identical. Here is the 8” one, listed as a model 103.0603:

Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be a manual available that I can find :(
But here is an old ad for them showing some of the accessories available:


(taken from this listing for a 9” one over at the VM site)

You might be able to cross it to the appropriate Atlas model to find a manual/parts listing.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7917 posts in 1844 days


#4 posted 04-12-2016 11:18 PM

The dead center on my Craftsman had to be pressed out at a repair shop. That was after other methods failed.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 741 days


#5 posted 04-12-2016 11:22 PM

The back of the tail stock has the numbers: 16006-103. It looks exactly like what you have pictured. Measuers 4.5” from spur to the bed. So I guess that means 9” swing. Searching Dunlap 16006-103. I find several tail stocks for sale
on e-bay at about $50. Makes me wonder if the owners replaced the tail stock with something better.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 741 days


#6 posted 04-12-2016 11:27 PM



The dead center on my Craftsman had to be pressed out at a repair shop. That was after other methods failed.

- Rick M.


What does pressed out mean?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#7 posted 04-12-2016 11:32 PM

What does pressed out mean?
- Combo Prof

Means he couldn’t figure out how to eject it, so he took it to someone with a huge honking hydraulic beastie machine to exert more force than you can with a metal rod and a hammer :)

That would be a last resort option when all others have failed.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 741 days


#8 posted 04-12-2016 11:52 PM

Brad it looks to me from catalog page you posted that (D) the cup center whose description says “For the tailstock of the lathe would fit over the installed dead point center. I may go see what a pipe wrench will do. :-]

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#9 posted 04-13-2016 12:09 AM

I’d be reluctant to take a pipe wrench on it as you might bugger things up… try removing the tailstock spindle and see if you can tap the dead center out that way first.

BTW, I think I was wrong about it being an Atlas made machine and think it was actually made by King-Seeley Corp. 101 is the sears prefix for Atlas, while 103 is the prefix for KS. Sorry about that.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 741 days


#10 posted 04-13-2016 12:39 AM

Just kidding (maybe) about the pipe wrench

Here is a link to a better image of the page from the 1942 catalog that Brad posted. It clearly shows that the additional tail center options are attached with set screws. Does this mean no morse taper?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 741 days


#11 posted 04-13-2016 01:11 AM

So Brad, How do I remove the tailstock spindle? Or do you mean the entire tail stock?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 741 days


#12 posted 04-13-2016 01:19 AM

I’ve been shown this restoration.

The author writes:

1. The tail stock does not have a live end, but rather a dead end, which means the pin that holds the right side of the wood does not spin. In order to keep the wood from building up to much friction and creating a high pitched squeal, all you have to do is scrape an old candle onto the end of your work piece…viola…no more squeal!

So I think if I want a live center I may just have to make my own tail stock.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#13 posted 04-13-2016 01:44 AM

Well, it seems like that lathe doesn’t have tapers but just a straight 5/8” spindle… accessories are slipped over the spindle and secured in place with set screws. Bummer that, as your after-market options get rather limited, but not a deal breaker – there is still a lot you can do with it. Since you have the lathe, you can make your own faceplates, jam chucks, mandrels and other stuff pretty easily out of scrap wood. A machine shop or someone handy in metalwork can make up various adapters as well (like “F” in that ad to give you a threaded end).

As for the tailstock spindle, and removing that dead center – I was suggesting removing just the spindle (quill?), not the whole tailstock. They usually come out pretty easily – just extend it out as far as it will go and it should come off the threaded rod that it runs on. After you get to a certain point where it disengages, it should slide the rest of the way just by pulling on it. Once out, it will be easier to address getting the stuck center off. You can still use that dead center though, and I use mine all the time. Like stated in your quote, just give it a good waxing before and during use.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Clarkie's profile

Clarkie

380 posts in 1305 days


#14 posted 04-13-2016 02:11 AM

Just for the heck of it, the tailstock could also be one solid piece. There should be a set screw in the crank handle, remove that and you should be able to tap the entire spindle out. Dunlap was at the far end of the tool world, not meant for anything other than weekend hobbyists. After removing the setscrew, check the area in the casting there should perhaps be one more set screw to guide the cylinder, to keep it straight. Find that one if it is there and back that off. Then go ahead and tap the cylinder out.

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2384 posts in 741 days


#15 posted 04-13-2016 02:26 AM


As for the tailstock spindle, and removing that dead center – I was suggesting removing just the spindle (quill?), not the whole tailstock. They usually come out pretty easily – just extend it out as far as it will go and it should come off the threaded rod that it runs on. After you get to a certain point where it disengages, it should slide the rest of the way just by pulling on it.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Thats what I was hoping for and expected to happen before I started this thread, but it doesn’t.


Just for the heck of it, the tailstock could also be one solid piece. There should be a set screw in the crank handle, remove that and you should be able to tap the entire spindle out. Dunlap was at the far end of the tool world, not meant for anything other than weekend hobbyists. After removing the setscrew, check the area in the casting there should perhaps be one more set screw to guide the cylinder, to keep it straight. Find that one if it is there and back that off. Then go ahead and tap the cylinder out.

- Clarkie

There is unfortunately no set screw in the crank handle.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

showing 1 through 15 of 81 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com