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Forum topic by MikeGraw posted 04-10-2016 08:20 PM 577 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MikeGraw

21 posts in 2386 days


04-10-2016 08:20 PM

My wife and I are in the planning stage of redoing our kitchen. I want to make plank board counter-tops, i.e. face board not butch block style.

I have seen articles where people use construction pine for the countertops to have their 1 1/2 inch countertop. Construction pine seems like it would be very soft for a countertop I think.

Other articles I have seen, people use 3/4 inch boards and glue them to 3/4 inch plywood to get the 1 1/2 inch countertop.

I was thinking of this approach as oak, maple and hickory over 4/4 can get pretty pricey. My concern though is the board will try to move with humidity changes and the plywood will not. Wouldn’t that lead to the boards cracking apart?

Would appreciate any input, especially from anyone who has tried either of these methods.

Thanks.

-- Mike's having fun in Central Wisconsin


8 replies so far

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01ntrain

146 posts in 534 days


#1 posted 04-10-2016 09:20 PM

If it’s a food-prep area, I would shy away from Oak or Hickory, the open grain could be problematic

I put a face-grain Sapele countertop and bar in my house, last year….and finished it with WB Spar Urethane, it’s holding up really well, with little to no movement that I can tell. I even skimped and didn’t finish it on both sides.

Also, Ikea as a really inexpensive Beech countertop that I hear gets good reviews.

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1077 posts in 3006 days


#2 posted 04-10-2016 09:32 PM

I’ve built many a wood countertop and personally I would never glue a wood coutertop to a sheet of plywood. I have fabricated many Corian coutertops and had to use plywood to help support the length, width and weight for over hangs. I drilled holes in the plywood and hold the top down with splotches of silicon so the top can move.

I’ve built many syp tops, have another one to make and a Cypress top to make also. The yellow pine has always held up just fine and unless you beat on it with something it should not be a problem. When I glue up a thick countertop I use 3/8” glue pins about 12 inches apart. SYP makes beautiful countertops if done correctly. I finish most all of my wood tops with 5 coats of Waterloc top and bottom. We’ve never had a failure on any of our countertops that I know of in the last 40 years.

The picture I’ve enclosed is a top make with Ambrosia Maple (Wormy Maple here) with a 1 inch drop edge added to it. I more or less mortised and tenoned the drop edge to it and it’s held in place with a small amount of glue about every 12 inches apart. the only place it actually moves where it can be seen is in the corners, The client knew and understood this and she told me she pays no attention to it. This top is also held down with dabs of silicon as most all of our wood tops are so they can move.

You can go here and see a Cypress top with some of the build. Cypress top

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

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conifur

955 posts in 616 days


#3 posted 04-10-2016 10:40 PM

Bruce101,
nice top, I know it is personal taste, or maybe the client wanted it or and because of wood counter top, I think that white over the top sink, sucks on your work. Anything but white. I remodeled many a kitchen, b4 I retired and sold my remodeling business, and love to cook in mine, nothing better then an under top mount. IMHO

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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bruc101

1077 posts in 3006 days


#4 posted 04-10-2016 10:51 PM

Thanks for the nice compliment.

She owns an antique store and wanted that sink in it. It actually looks much better than the pictures. You should see what she put on her vanities. That one top also got me three more tops from her friends in Atlanta. That’s her vacation-retirement home and the other tops went in expensive vacation-retirement homes on the same lake.

We install very few undermount sinks here. I think I’ve installed only one, other than Corian and farm sinks in the last 5 years. Sinks are the client’s personal choice not mine.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

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conifur

955 posts in 616 days


#5 posted 04-10-2016 11:05 PM

Bruce I understand.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View MikeGraw's profile

MikeGraw

21 posts in 2386 days


#6 posted 04-11-2016 01:05 AM

Great work Bruce. What is syp?

-- Mike's having fun in Central Wisconsin

View 01ntrain's profile

01ntrain

146 posts in 534 days


#7 posted 04-11-2016 01:15 AM

Southern Yellow Pine

View noblevfd's profile

noblevfd

48 posts in 2921 days


#8 posted 04-11-2016 01:35 AM

Hi Mike I add thickness to my tables and counter tops by gluing another board with same looking grain pattern along long side and if stock is long enough add a foot, then when top is together cut 6 inches off each end, flip under and glue to bottom of top, you have to fit it between the added long boards on sides, this keeps grain orientation matching for equal movement and you get a thick looking top without having to buy 2in. stock pics are a kitchen table I made with some figured walnut 3/4 boards quarter sawn


Bob

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