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Forum topic by schlehrbear posted 03-17-2010 06:40 AM 1730 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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schlehrbear

17 posts in 2454 days


03-17-2010 06:40 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw

I just bought this saw on sale (at a steAl) 450 bones. And I put it together myself in 4hrs flat. There were a few minor hang ups, such as missing nuts and bolts. So here’s the question that I would like a few ans to. I am having major issUes with the fence. The fence tails out from the blade 1/64 of an inch and no matter how much I dink with it I just can’t get it where I think it should be. (2000ths is whAt I’m aiming for) ne suggestions?? I’m thinking about possibly aftermarket fence system or return it I’ve haD it 15 Days on a 30 day tryout. But all in all it is a fantastic saw when I clamp ash and walnut to the table for a fence!!!!!!!!!! Oh and by the way this saw will cut ne thing with out probs plenty of power!


6 replies so far

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Luke

545 posts in 2755 days


#1 posted 03-17-2010 06:47 AM

Did you align everything correctly? blade to miters, miters to fence?

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

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schlehrbear

17 posts in 2454 days


#2 posted 03-17-2010 06:54 AM

Blade to miter is at .0000 just behind the diggers on the same tooth rotated back I guess what u would call the standard in miter to blade or blade to miter. As far as miter to fence that’s where the 1/64th comes from. Its not 1/64th from the blade to fence its 1/64th from miter to fence I uSed the wrong terminology in my previous statement

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knotscott

7210 posts in 2837 days


#3 posted 03-17-2010 01:24 PM

A slight “tail out” is actual suggested by many manufacturers to avoid the possibility of pinching and causing kickback. If the saw is cutting well, a tail out of 1/64” is actually about right IMO. Just put a good blade on it and go to town.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Luke

545 posts in 2755 days


#4 posted 03-18-2010 05:12 AM

I can’t disagree more knot. You want the wood to cut in as straight a line as possible. If you notice the wood moving away from the fence as you cut you may try to compensate and end up with kickback of a different sort. If you think you can push the wood through straight anyways your fooling yourself. You might as well not use a fence at all then. There’s no reason why a blade cannot be set and used absolute parallel to the fence. Bear: it sounds like you should look in the manual for how to adjust the fence to the miter slot. You most likely loosen a bolt or two and move the fence into the correct position. If you know the blade is .0000 which is 1/10000? your using some high tech tools to measure or typed too many zeros. The manual should explain everything about setting up the saw to run true. If your blade is parallel to the miter slot then you could use either to measure parallel to your fence.

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

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knotscott

7210 posts in 2837 days


#5 posted 03-18-2010 01:54 PM

Luke – You may not agree with the manufacturers suggestion or follow it, but you can’t disagree that many blade and fence manufacturers, instructors, and seasoned wwers do suggest a “slight” toe out of the fence away from the blade…typically 0.002” to 0.003”, about the thickness of a folded dollar bill. The rationale is that while perfectly straight is “perfect”, very few fences, fence faces, or alignments are truly “perfect”....many have slight imperfections. A slight toe out at the end of the fence helps ensure that a dangerous “toe in” situation does not occur due to these common variations from perfect.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Luke

545 posts in 2755 days


#6 posted 03-19-2010 12:26 AM

I can get on board with that statement, yeah. But above you said that 1/64” is actually about right. 3/1000 and 1/64 are VERY big differences. I agree with you, but not a 64th.

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

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