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Forum topic by TravelinGal posted 04-07-2016 05:58 PM 585 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TravelinGal

3 posts in 241 days


04-07-2016 05:58 PM

I’m not a big DIY person. I don’t want to invest a lot of money as I don’t know if/when I’d use it again. Well, here are the details:

Years ago I applied dry rub transfers (Tatouage) to my son’s bedroom walls and now we are getting our house ready to sell.
I need to sand the walls where the images are before we repaint the room. The images do not need to be completely removed, but I do need to get a good amount of them off.

I need something lightweight and easy to use as I do not have a lot of strength in my arms. The images are on all four walls, but spread out. Too much for sanding just by hand – I need some power behind it.

The walls are the knock down texture (I think that’s what it’s called – a smooth bumpy texture…house built in 1999).

How do I go about picking a sander?

Thanks!!
Robin


15 replies so far

View clin's profile

clin

510 posts in 457 days


#1 posted 04-07-2016 06:32 PM

I wouldn’t think dry rub transfers would be thick enough to matter and could just be painted over.

Assuming you just need to feather the edges and lightly sand, I’d suggest a Black & Decker mouse power sander. They are inexpensive, very light weight and they are shaped like a small cloths iron and therefore have a pointed corner for getting into small places. Plus they have an attachment just for small spots.

As with all pad sanders, they use Velcro to attach the sanding pad. So you can try different grits from coarse to fine. I suggest starting with fine grit to make sure it is not too aggressive. If it isn’t working fast enough, then move to a coarser grit. Once you figure that out, then if need be, you can finish with a finer grit, though I wouldn’t think it necessary since it will be painted.

It’s unclear to me how much sanding you really need to do. I would think you want to avoid taking off much of the wall texture, else you’ll have to touch this up which takes some skill to get it to look correct.

If you really need to remove material, you’ll need a belt sander. More expensive and a lot larger and relatively heavy. Unless someone makes some sort of mini version, this would be just the opposite of light weight.

Also, have you looked to see if there is something you can wash these off with? Might be a whole lot easier. Even if the solvent takes a little paint off, so what, you’re repainting anyway.

Maybe even something as simple as some soap and water, and a Scotchbrite pad.

-- Clin

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teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#2 posted 04-07-2016 06:43 PM

I think you need to go to a quality hardware store and go the chemical route. Mechanical sanding on a wall surface might be one of those “cure is worse than the disease” things. But if you insist, simply google drywall sanders. Aleko seems to be popular but it isn’t cheap and I doubt you’ll use it again.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1740 posts in 600 days


#3 posted 04-07-2016 06:59 PM

If you sand your textured walls, you’re going to remove the texture, at least to some degree, and it’s going to look horrible after you paint it. Have you tried heating with a hair dryer and using a stiff nylon bristle brush to get them off? If not, then something like Clin suggested might be a good idea. Try some “goo-gone” and a toothbrush or scotchbrite pads.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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TravelinGal

3 posts in 241 days


#4 posted 04-07-2016 07:27 PM

Here is one section…it goes from the floor to about the height of the door.
There are more images all around the room, but they are blocked by boxes right now…

(Sorry photo is rotated sideways..it shows right side up and n my iPad )

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Woodbum

728 posts in 2526 days


#5 posted 04-07-2016 07:41 PM

I have sanded a lot od freshly hung drywall prior to painting, wallpapering or texturing. Don’t sand through the drywall paper or the joint tape if the walls are not textured. If they are don’t sand the texture or it will stand out like a sore thumb. Try a primer coat of paint and then your color choice. Ask the paint dealer about the best covering latex that they sell. All in all, sanding finished drywall to remove paint or dry transfers is not a good idea.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

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OSU55

1056 posts in 1451 days


#6 posted 04-07-2016 08:07 PM

Instead of sanding use zinsser shellac based primer (not just shellac). Covers very well and excellent sealing / bleed through protection.

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TravelinGal

3 posts in 241 days


#7 posted 04-07-2016 08:38 PM

Wow. Didn’t know I was that off track! Thank you all for your suggestions and help!

Obviously, anything that involves a toothbrush would be far too labor intensive since the murals are so large. But I will figure it out with all the help from this forum.

I remember my parents paintng over a decorated wall (whole wall was the coke logo!) and you could see the outlines of the image even though they used a primer and then paint. The red was well covered, but you could still see the design.

Thanks again!!

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#8 posted 04-08-2016 12:01 AM



Wow. Didn t know I was that off track! Thank you all for your suggestions and help!

Obviously, anything that involves a toothbrush would be far too labor intensive since the murals are so large. But I will figure it out with all the help from this forum.

I remember my parents paintng over a decorated wall (whole wall was the coke logo!) and you could see the outlines of the image even though they used a primer and then paint. The red was well covered, but you could still see the design.

Thanks again!!

- TravelinGal

Is that a glossy surface? Is so then if you can remove it with the hair dryer/chemical stripper, I’d start there. If that doesn’t work without causing great damage to the sheetrock, then I guess I’d go with a coarse sandpaper over the surface to roughen it up. Then a skim coat of drywall compound (light weight “blue” should work…dries faster and sands easier) with a wide knife to bury the outline (might take a few coats). Follow with primer and paint. Your paint store will have additives to get close to the existing texture.

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1015 posts in 1390 days


#9 posted 04-08-2016 12:20 AM

Kilz primer x 2, then paint

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#10 posted 04-08-2016 12:38 AM



Kilz primer x 2, then paint

- Picklehead

Primer (I use Bullseye but I think they and Kilz are the same product) dries fast and without much depth so I doubt it will hide the outline. But it might provide enough “bite” over a glossy surface for paint. I still think that a skim coat of drywall compound around the edges (feathered into the non-applique area) will be required to hide the outline. Probably a coat of primer first to let the drywall primer adhere to something, then skim coat then re-prime the entire area.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

817 posts in 381 days


#11 posted 04-08-2016 01:15 PM

TravelinGal,

It appears to me that you may have two problems. The first is the thickness of the dry rub transfers. If the transfers have an edge, then the edges would have to be feathered for a smooth transition to the surrounding drywall. Given the intricate design and the textured walls, feathering these edges will be a difficult and time consuming task. If the edges are not feathered and stand proud of the surrounding surface, the image outlines will telegraph through any paint applied to the walls. But if you can rub your hand across the surface of the dry rub transfer and feel no transitional edges and no transitional edges can be seen, then I doubt feathering is needed.

The second problem is that the rub transfer may absorb paint more or less than the surrounding area. If this is the case, in my experience it is very difficult to develop a uniform sheen to the entire repainted wall. After primer and five coats of egg shell paint, the areas that were formerly covered with mirrors in our home, although faint, can still be seen. I have not used a shellac based primer and this may help with any differential absorption of paint. In any case in am sure a primer is required. The rub transfer images should be spot primed until the image cannot be seen through the primer. Once the areas are spot primed, the entire wall should then receive a primer coat.

The methods and materials already suggested can be tried as needed to solve these two problems. In addition, if a quality paint with a flat sheen is used for the top coat, it will make it more difficult to see the images.

If all these efforts fail to produce satisfactory results, then the only other option of which I can think is to replace the drywall. This would be expensive since you would probably need a professional who does drywall for a living. I am not sure I would exercise this last option if the home will be priced at the lower or lower middle ends of the market. On the other hand, if the home is priced at the upper middle to high end of the market, I would probably replace the drywall.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3550 posts in 1229 days


#12 posted 04-08-2016 01:51 PM

Just wondering,
Can she get some drywall mud (instead of paint, primer, etc.), thin it to cake batter consistency and then used a roller brush to coat everything before painting it??

-- earthartandfoods.com

View MinnesotaSteve's profile

MinnesotaSteve

19 posts in 352 days


#13 posted 04-08-2016 05:21 PM

My google-fu shows these transfers are really thin, and everything I found says you just paint over them. You don’t want to sand as that will mess up the wall texture. I think you can just prime and paint it.

I would go to a paint store, not a big box store and ask their advice just to be sure.

I’d suggest Zinsser Bullseye 123 primer, followed up with a quality latex paint. The Bullseye name is only sold in paint stores. They sell it as All-Prime or something at the big box stores. The big box stores seem to sell more Kilz, but I found the Zinsser product line to be much better.

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#14 posted 04-08-2016 07:45 PM



My google-fu shows these transfers are really thin, and everything I found says you just paint over them. You don t want to sand as that will mess up the wall texture. I think you can just prime and paint it.

I would go to a paint store, not a big box store and ask their advice just to be sure.

I d suggest Zinsser Bullseye 123 primer, followed up with a quality latex paint. The Bullseye name is only sold in paint stores. They sell it as All-Prime or something at the big box stores. The big box stores seem to sell more Kilz, but I found the Zinsser product line to be much better.

- MinnesotaSteve


Didn’t bother to look up the particular applique but you did…apparently not that thick so probably priming over it will hide the outline. Will still need something to replicate the “knock-down” finish but I’m sure a reputable paint store will be able to help her there. Being the smart-ass that I am, have to wonder whether she will repeat the experience on her new house (pictures/posters are much easier to deal with when no longer desired).

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1451 days


#15 posted 04-09-2016 01:08 PM

FYI Lowe’s does have the Zinsser Bullseye 123 primer

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