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Forum topic by rolltopbox posted 03-16-2010 10:51 AM 1788 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rolltopbox

71 posts in 2461 days


03-16-2010 10:51 AM

I get some of the eyes tearing out in the planer and want to know if there is a good way to fill them before finishing?

-- Bruce http://www.finecraftfurniture.com


12 replies so far

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Timberwerks

355 posts in 2628 days


#1 posted 03-16-2010 04:32 PM

CA glue or epoxy works well. Also try wetting down your stock with mineral spirts before planing and try planing askew if possible.

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

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Timberwerks

355 posts in 2628 days


#2 posted 03-16-2010 04:44 PM

Oh Bruce, one more thing. Next time you have your blades sharpened have them sharpened with a back bevel. Armstrong Saw & Tool does a fantastic job, they have drop of and pick up points in the Milwaukee area. Our Rockler and Woodcraft may even use them: Armstrong Saw & Tool 262-626-4410. N110 Hwy W. Campbellsport, WI

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

#3 posted 03-17-2010 02:37 PM

Could someone please clarify what Timberwerks means by “back bevel”? I’ll PM him if necessary.
Thanks!!

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

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Timberwerks

355 posts in 2628 days


#4 posted 03-17-2010 03:09 PM

This may help: http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/BackBeveling_Tips.html It’s a second bevel that is ground on your blades, similar to a micro bevel on your chisel or plane blade. This bevel is actually on the front of blade though. Here is more info: http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Knife_Grinding_and_Woodworking_Manual_5.html

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

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SPalm

5257 posts in 3349 days


#5 posted 03-17-2010 05:18 PM

This is a different kind of answer, but if you use a thickness sander for the last passes on such delicate type of woods, they usually don’t tear out.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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rwyoung

388 posts in 2939 days


#6 posted 03-17-2010 06:04 PM

By putting a back bevel on the planer cutters, you are increasing their effective cutting angle. This is standard operating procedure for handplane blades when working with difficult stock (birds-eye maple qualifies).

Raising the cutting angle makes the blades work more and more like scrapers.

The two down sides are weakening of the cutting edge so it can become dull sooner (YMMV) and you should take a lighter pass.

One think I’ve wondered about is having power planer blades similar to toothing blades for a handplane. The toothing plane has a very high attack angle (typically 75 to 90 degrees) and while it can’t remove stock quickly, it will do a very good job of leveling stock without tearing out & has grain direction independence. It is then followed by a very light smoothing plane pass to remove the small ridges caused by the teeth.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

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miles125

2180 posts in 3473 days


#7 posted 03-17-2010 06:16 PM

Sand them out! Nothing you fill in with is going to look good.

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

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rolltopbox

71 posts in 2461 days


#8 posted 03-17-2010 08:50 PM

Most of these thoughts are towards preventing tearout. I already have the tearout so it is too late to prevent it. Just thought I’d see if anyone had any good ideas for filling?

-- Bruce http://www.finecraftfurniture.com

#9 posted 03-17-2010 09:06 PM

This might seem silly, but maybe a sheet of Birdseye Maple veneer over top of the board would hide the tearout… UUUGH, that was just wrong… Sorry! LOL

Maybe a thick epoxy finish, like a pour-on bar top finish would fill the tearout, but it wouldn’t necessarily hide it. Maybe you can accent it by filling the tearout with some turquoise powder and epoxy, much like some woodworkers fill checks and bark inclusions…

I’m really stretching it here, so just let me know if you think these ideas are totally idiotic!!
;-P

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

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Timberwerks

355 posts in 2628 days


#10 posted 03-17-2010 09:29 PM

I would try the CA or Epoxy and perhaps tint it a bit to match the eyes as much as possible this way it will look more like a natural defect vs tearout. It really depends on the size of the areas that are torn out. Smoothing any rough areas before filling will also help hide the repair. Another option is to mix your own Maple filler and draw or paint in the area to match the grain or mimic an eye.

-- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timberwerks-Studio/126415221682

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jamiller

4 posts in 2547 days


#11 posted 03-29-2010 04:24 PM

rolltopbox,

I know it is too late at this point, so I don’t have great recommendations on the filler (I’d use cyanaoacrylate). I recently purchased 250 BF of BEM from Barlow on Lumberjocks and I am processing it with a Grizzly jointer and a Dewalt planer, both equiped with a Byrd Shelix head w/the individual carbide cutters. I bought these specifically to process figured woods, and while they are expensive, they are cheaper than tearing out beautiful birdseye. With these heads I am getting zero tearouts!

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rolltopbox

71 posts in 2461 days


#12 posted 03-30-2010 04:22 PM

jamiller,

250 bdft of be maple..!! That is a lot. What the heck are you making with it? You don’t have any pictures posted.

-- Bruce http://www.finecraftfurniture.com

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