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Filling large wormholes, knot holes and cracks/checks in rustic oak floor

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Forum topic by toddbeaulieu posted 04-07-2016 02:08 AM 620 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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toddbeaulieu

780 posts in 2465 days


04-07-2016 02:08 AM

I’ve read a bit about using epoxy on small projects, but wondering if anyone has any experience with “Cabin grade” oak flooring? I’ve got reclaimed timbers that were milled into new flooring. While I love the look (I use wormy lumber often in furniture), I can’t imagine leaving the larger holes open on a floor. Suspect I’d have to back problem areas with duct tape (for example) to form a dam.

Thank you.


7 replies so far

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Mark Wilson

1740 posts in 524 days


#1 posted 04-07-2016 05:44 AM

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toddbeaulieu

780 posts in 2465 days


#2 posted 04-07-2016 10:56 AM

Thanks Mark. Inlace is another potential trick here. Oh, I also forget to mention old school inlay patches. I might ultimately want a variety of patches throughout the room.

After watching your link I discovered this one from Advanced Repair Technology looks promising because it’s flexible and has a lower viscosity so I don’t think I’d be wasting as much out the bottom. I’m going to look into the pricing of this now. Assuming it’s not cheap…

I started the video at the point where they show coloring the epoxy and what it looks like plugged.

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toddbeaulieu

780 posts in 2465 days


#3 posted 04-07-2016 05:04 PM

Well, after a few more hours of research and a call to West Systems, I decided to go with them. I think I let an ad on flexible epoxy influence me on the above idea. The more I thought about it the more I theorized that I don’t actually need flexability because I’m not going to fill between boards.

I’m going with 105 epoxy with 207 clear hardener for most of the holes. I’ll either add in their 406 filler or use the Six10 caulk, which is just premixed thickened to jump start the big holes. Because the filler is white I’ll have to dye those.

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toddbeaulieu

780 posts in 2465 days


#4 posted 05-27-2016 11:46 AM

Figured I’d follow up in case anyone’s interested. The floor is complete. I like it. I’d go with less black if I had it to do over, but I’m still quite happy with it. It’s got a lot of character. I did a mix of black and clear. In some holes I did both, which I like the look of. I injected some black first, filling the bottom of the hole and then came back in with clear. It resulted in an interesting sense of depth. Knots look awesome with black, as do nail holes. I found that I prefer clear on the plain sections, though. I love the west epoxy, especially the metering pumps. I used their 406 filler for the larger holes that the thin epoxy was just running through, and never ended up using the $25 tube of Six10 caulk. I’m going with the theory that I won’t have problems with wood movement, but time will tell. Four coats of minwax ultimate with 220 sanding before the last.

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Cooler

270 posts in 304 days


#5 posted 05-27-2016 01:08 PM

So after all the work reclaiming the boards was it worth it? Would you recommend it over commercial oak flooring?

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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toddbeaulieu

780 posts in 2465 days


#6 posted 05-27-2016 01:13 PM

I bought the flooring milled from reclaimed timbers. I didn’t do any of that work. I like the idea of reclaimed and I like the look. I couldn’t have achieved that with normal flooring, even character grade because that has no wormholes and no nail holes or marks. So this was the only route I had. But, it was a lot of work applying the epoxy that took several hour long sessions. It was also a lot of work hand scraping after sanding.

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Cooler

270 posts in 304 days


#7 posted 05-27-2016 01:44 PM



I bought the flooring milled from reclaimed timbers. I didn t do any of that work. I like the idea of reclaimed and I like the look. I couldn t have achieved that with normal flooring, even character grade because that has no wormholes and no nail holes or marks. So this was the only route I had. But, it was a lot of work applying the epoxy that took several hour long sessions. It was also a lot of work hand scraping after sanding.

- toddbeaulieu

I understood that from your earlier posts. But you have not answered my questions:

1. Was it worth it? Would you do it again?
2. Would you recommend it to others?

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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