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Sound Reduction Ideas for 3HP DC

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Forum topic by BinghamtonEd posted 04-06-2016 01:06 PM 466 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


04-06-2016 01:06 PM

Today I’m bringing home my first dust collector (stepping up from a Shop Vac & Dust Deputy). It is a used 3HP Reliant DC, with 60’ of 4” hose (3 sections, plus connectors). My work is downsizing our footprint and the shop equipment is rarely used, so I made an offer on it. This DC sat connected to both a RAS and 12/14” Rockwell TS for years, barely used. I figured for $100, I couldn’t go wrong. I plan using a thein pre-separator, and running the hose along the ceiling, with a drop on each side of the garage (due to space limitations, the tool I’m using gets pulled to the middle of one side of the garage when in use, they’re all mobile).

My question is this : Has anybody done any simple modifications that would reduce the overall operating noise from a unit like this? I work out of my 2-car garage, and placing the unit (or any part of it) outside or in another room is not an option. Also, at this time, building a separate room for it is not an option. I was wondering if there were any small baffled enclosures that could bolt over the motor/impeller housing or something.

For reference, the unit is set up exactly like this one :

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.


8 replies so far

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1727 posts in 1431 days


#1 posted 04-06-2016 02:02 PM

http://www.oneida-air.com/inventoryD.asp?item_no=SCOLLECT34

Hey Ed. I have never tried this myself, but it may work to help to reduce the sound by a few decibels. It also will probably drop the static pressure of the machine, but that one should have plenty of power for what you are doing.

Hope this helps

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2437 days


#2 posted 04-06-2016 02:36 PM

Just a curious question…are you planning on running the DC connected to a running tool without wearing hearing protection? In my mind, any tool connected to a DC will be loud enough to require hearing protection anyway, especially with your proximity to the tool vs the DC. Unless the DC is really way louder than the tool, does it matter?

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#3 posted 04-06-2016 02:40 PM



Just a curious question…are you planning on running the DC connected to a running tool without wearing hearing protection? In my mind, any tool connected to a DC will be loud enough to require hearing protection anyway, especially with your proximity to the tool vs the DC. Unless the DC is really way louder than the tool, does it matter?

- hotbyte


What he said^^^^^^. You got a good buy on that, but I think those came with 30 micron bags.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View JBrow's profile (online now)

JBrow

818 posts in 381 days


#4 posted 04-06-2016 02:49 PM

BinghamtonEd,

I used UltraSonic acoustical panels in combination with denim insulation to tame Dust Collector noise. The UltaSonic panels use 3M strips and are designed to be mounted on walls. These cut well with a sharp pair of scissors. A product like this could be fashioned and stuck directly to the blower housing. I also used some wide tape to increase the thickness from 1” to 2” in some areas. Although there are several places where acoustical panels (Google Acoustical Panels) can be purchased, it appears Home Depot carries the UltraSonic panels.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Bonded-Logic-Inc-UltraSonic-12-in-x-12-in-Acoustic-Panels-Package-of-6-60600-11212/204153700

Trying to wrap the blower housing with bat insulation (denim or mineral wood) is also possible, but holding it in place is difficult. Plus it is pretty ugly. But if the Dust Collector is set on a platform, like ¾” plywood, a small enclosure for the blower unit only could be constructed to accept bat insulation. However, I am not sure you have enough room to enclose just the blower housing. In my experience, fiberglass insulation does little to stop noise.

Applying acoustical panels to the blower will help, but you may want more noise abatement. If that is the case, building an enclosure with noise abating insulation is probably necessary. A lot of people use mineral wool. I choose denim insulation because it seemed to offer a little greater sound attenuation. This is the approach I took; essentially a compact portable room.

A ¾” piece of plywood, set on castors, could be the platform on which the Dust Collector sets. 2×4 framing at 24” OC mounted to the platform would make up the walls. The walls would be covered it ½” or ¼” sheet goods (hardboard would be cheap), screwed in place so that these could be removed if ever required. Then a top would hold the walls in place.

With your Dust Collector, I think I would consider a pair right angle doors hinged at the rear corners. A pair of studs in front of the blower housed would be where the right angle doors latch. With these the right angle doors open, there would be sufficient access in the front and sides to service the unit. However a pair of doors on each side of the Dust Collector could also work; latched at the corners (ideally with no permanent corner post to get in the way). The idea is to afford total access to the unit for servicing.

Noise abating un-faced 3-1/2” insulation would fit between the studs. Burlap stapled over the insulation would hold it in place.

An area, probably in the back (and/or top) would have to feature space for sufficient air to escape the enclosure. This could be simply a space where no sheet good panels are installed. Alternatively, an insulated back panel could be installed on standoffs. These standoff spacer blocks would be mounting blocks for the insulated back panel. An air gaps established by the spacer blocks would allow air from the Dust Collector to escape while capturing some noise. The standoff space blocks would have to be sized to match the CFM of the Dust Collector.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#5 posted 04-06-2016 02:55 PM

I won’t be running the power tools without hearing protection. My main reason for wanting to do this is to minimize the sound impact to the living space above the garage.

As per the bags, I plan to replace them with 1-micron bags for the time being. Down the road, I’d like to go to the canister filters, but that’s pretty far out of my budget for the time being.

After getting some nasty, lingering coughs over the past year or two, I’ve gotten in the habit of wearing my respirator in the shop, when I’m doing anything that produces a lot of dust.

If I can find time this summer, I’d like to also build a ceiling-mounted air cleaner, if I can find a cheap/free squirrel cage fan on CL or something.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2437 days


#6 posted 04-06-2016 03:33 PM

:) Good reason! Keep them above you happy so they don’t bug you about being in the shop.


I won t be running the power tools without hearing protection. My main reason for wanting to do this is to minimize the sound impact to the living space above the garage.

- BinghamtonEd


View clin's profile

clin

510 posts in 457 days


#7 posted 04-06-2016 03:43 PM

Since your main concern is reducing sound to other areas of the house, if you build any type of enclosure for the DC, DO NOT attach this to the walls or ceiling of the garage. For example, DO NOT place the DC up against a wall and use that wall as one side of your enclosure.

Sound is vibrations and you want to decouple the mechanical connection of the enclosure to the rest of the house. The best sound proofing for a room is a room-in-a-room concept. In your case, this inside room can be the enclosure around the entire DC.

Furthermore, the more massive this enclosure the better. The more massive it is, the less the inside noise will vibrate it, and therefore the less the enclosure can vibrate the outside air making sound. Of course don’t allow the DC to touch your enclosure ANYWHERE.

As mentioned, lining the interior will help to absorb sound, but this has it’s limitations. These absorbing materials tend to absorb the highest frequencies more than the low ones. Unless the material is VERY thick (feet thick), low frequencies will still get through. But something is better than nothing.

Now a DC needs to suck air in and exhaust it, so you obviously cannot create a truly sound proof enclosure. A lot of sound will transmit through the intake and exhaust ports. There’s not much you can do with the intake port. Though I would think some sort of soft coupling like a ribber boot might help. Also, I would think if you could anchor the intake duct to the floor very securely, might at least prevent vibrations form translating down the entire length of the duct.

Sound dampening the exhaust is easier since the air is filtered, and the exhaust port can be lined with sound absorbing material. If you built a large enclosure over the entire DC (practical?) you could vent it near the top, but then duct this down the sides exhausting it near the bottom. The idea is to make as long a path as possible lined with sound absorbing material. That way at least as much sound as possible can be removed from the exhaust.

The more corners you can make the exhaust turn, the more the sound will get absorbed. Vents for allowing airflow with minimal sound transmission have a sort of maze like path with several 180 deg turns.

Regardless of how far you take this, I’m sure a simple, box enclosure with some sound absorbing material on the inside, will make a noticeable difference.

-- Clin

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#8 posted 04-06-2016 04:21 PM

Thanks for all of the suggestions. I think I’m going to merge some of the ideas here together.

I’m thinking that, since this thing is already on a platform, I can make a box enclosure around the motor and impeller housing. Basically a 1/2” plywood box, with a removable top, which is secured with some wing nuts or something, to provide access if needed. The main portion of the box (bottom & sides) is secured to the platform, and extends up to the duct that go to the bags. The top can slip on to and will have a cutout to fit around the vertical duct. I think I could line the cutoutfor the top, and around the intake, with rubber weatherstripping to seal around them. The back of the box would have a vent for the exhaust that would snake back and forth. The inside of the box, and the vent, would be lined with sound-dampening acoustic panels.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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