LumberJocks

Need help with table legs

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by monstermash posted 04-05-2016 11:24 PM 481 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View monstermash's profile

monstermash

4 posts in 242 days


04-05-2016 11:24 PM

hey guys, this is my first post. I need some help. I’m an amateur furniture maker, i just make stuff around the house, for friends, etc. I recently came across a dining table that I’d love to make, but I can’t figure out these legs.

So I see that they’re relatively simple, but I can’t really SEE the joinery at the top, and I don’t like to make things that wouldn’t stand the tests of a professional furniture maker, so I wouldnt use screws or pocket holes or things of that nature.

Can anyone help me design the top piece joinery?

these are the only pics i could find of this table


13 replies so far

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 612 days


#1 posted 04-06-2016 12:16 AM

I doubt they used a tenon into the top, top is too thin for a good one. Since that is commercially made they used some type of fastener. I would add a shallow, thin skirt for a perimeter connecting the legs, maybe 1 1/4-1 1/2” width of 3/4 stock, and used that to attach the top with.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 902 days


#2 posted 04-06-2016 01:21 AM

At first glance, that looks like an “apron-less” table, but a close look at the second pic makes me think there may be a structure similar to this underneath, which would allow for traditional fastening of the top (buttons, clips, figure-8’s, etc.)

If it were me, I’d be tempted to add some length-wise aprons as well, something like this:

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 612 days


#3 posted 04-06-2016 01:33 AM



At first glance, that looks like an “apron-less” table, but a close look at the second pic makes me think there may be a structure similar to this underneath, which would allow for traditional fastening of the top (buttons, clips, figure-8 s, etc.)

If it were me, I d be tempted to add some length-wise aprons as well, something like this:

- jerryminer


Well that is what I said too, but not that wide, just because they want a clean look underneath, , glad we are on the same page.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 902 days


#4 posted 04-06-2016 01:36 AM

As to joinery, how about a bridle joint (maybe with some pegs—not shown)?:

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 612 days


#5 posted 04-06-2016 01:38 AM

If I was making that table, nice clean looks, I like that, I would make the top 7/8”’ minimum, 1” max to keep that delicate lines not bulky, and maybe a 1/4”, 45* campher on the under side edge.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 902 days


#6 posted 04-06-2016 01:42 AM

Looks like we ARE on the same page!

View John Wainwright's profile

John Wainwright

15 posts in 244 days


#7 posted 04-06-2016 03:49 AM

On a side note jerry – what software are you using?

-- What wood John do?

View monstermash's profile

monstermash

4 posts in 242 days


#8 posted 04-06-2016 06:21 AM

guys you’re helping me immensely. i think for stability i gotta go with the thin apron. would buttons be the best way to attach the top considering it’s effectively an apron’d table? on the flip side, does anyone know the consequences long-term of doing JUST a bridle joint and attaching legs? i imagine the middle might bow over time, but I haven’t done anything like this before.

thanks again for help. the images especially are extremely helpful, what software is that?

View monstermash's profile

monstermash

4 posts in 242 days


#9 posted 04-06-2016 06:40 AM

on another note, how about the bridle joints and a skirt running down the middle connecting the two legs instead of an apron on both sides?

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 902 days


#10 posted 04-06-2016 07:22 AM



On a side note jerry – what software are you using?

- John Wainwright


I use SeketchUp—-a free downloadable program—and love it!

Sketchup

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 902 days


#11 posted 04-06-2016 07:42 AM

”would buttons be the best way to attach the top considering it’s effectively an apron’d table? ”

Buttons, clips, slotted holes in cleats—-they are all equal in my book. Use what feels comfortable to you.

”... the consequences long-term of doing JUST a bridle joint and attaching legs? ”

Do you mean eliminating the long aprons? Two issues:

1. Without the support of the apron, the top could sag over time—-probably not a serious issue, though. More importantly:

2. There would be very little resistance to racking—someone pulling or pushing one end of the table could over-stress the leg-to-top connection and potentially colllapse the table, or at least make it wobbly.

View monstermash's profile

monstermash

4 posts in 242 days


#12 posted 04-06-2016 08:51 AM

interesting. i feel you. what if we do basically a thin apron IN LIEU of the bridle joint? theoretically this would mean the apron boards would be mortised into the sides of the leg, i’m not sure how I feel about this.

such a simple design needs such consideration!

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 902 days


#13 posted 04-06-2016 09:54 PM

The advantage of running the apron through the leg with a bridle joint is that you can keep the leg inset deeply from the table edge (as per the original pic) but still provide support for the table top closer to the edge. This can help keep the top flat while “hiding” most of the sub-structure.

Of course you can build this table with traditional M&T apron-to-leg joinery, but with a deep inset on the legs, you run the risk of a top that warps.

The narrower and shorter you make the apron, the greater the risk of failure. Are you feeling lucky?

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com