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Cabinet for DW745 Table Saw and RA1181 Router Table

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Forum topic by scottkeen posted 04-05-2016 01:46 PM 1490 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scottkeen

44 posts in 389 days


04-05-2016 01:46 PM

I have a Dewalt DW745 table saw and a Bosch RA1181 router table. I want to put these into a movable cabinet with both tool tables at the same height and the ability to use the other tool’s fence (i.e. use the router table fence to rip wide cuts on the table saw).

The Bosch RA1181 router table is a cast aluminum table bolted to a crappy plastic base. I have the Bosch router lift installed and it all works good with my 1617 router. Rather than buy a new router table insert and build a new table top, I figured I’ll just use the router table top and lift, and scrap the crappy plastic base. The only problem was that it determined the width of the entire cabinet since it was wider than the table saw.

I needed 14-5/8” clearance under the router table for the router and lift to fit, and my table saw is 13” tall which is why I had to put two 1-5/8” shims under the table saw. The lower compartments of the cabinet will be used for storage with drawers or cabinet doors, not sure which or both or neither.

I’m planning to build this with 3/4” plywood doubled up to 1-1/2” thick. Since this will be moved around a lot (5” casters), I figured it needed to be pretty solid, also considering all the vibration the tools make. The dimensions are 27” wide x 48” long x 34” tall (including casters).

The cut plan is pretty gnarly. I’m not looking forward to all those rabbets and dados.

Spent waaaay too much time in SketchUp. I think I was trying to avoid actually building this in reality.


20 replies so far

View pete724's profile

pete724

36 posts in 272 days


#1 posted 04-06-2016 07:14 AM

I did something similar but apparently not for the same reasons.

Put the routertable top on the other side of my DW745 and rotated it 90 degrees.

That way the router table fits between the rack n pinion rails of the saw.

I will NOT be using the router tables fence for the saw. I don’t think it would stand up to that.
I can however just clamp a long wood fence on the table for wide saw cuts.

*skill brand router table

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OSU55

1056 posts in 1452 days


#2 posted 04-06-2016 11:37 AM

You might think about putting the extra depth added to the saw in front rather than in back, to give more lead in before the saw blade for a too small top.

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#3 posted 04-06-2016 01:00 PM

If I was in your shoes, I’d seriously consider adding some usable “landing” space in front of the same blade. A fence extension of some sort would probably be useful, but that shouldn’t be too hard to whip up. Even if you only add 4-5” you’d be doubling the operating space in front of the blade.

Some rough ideas to illustrate:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View trevor7428's profile

trevor7428

149 posts in 424 days


#4 posted 04-06-2016 04:58 PM



If I was in your shoes, I d seriously consider adding some usable “landing” space in front of the same blade. A fence extension of some sort would probably be useful, but that shouldn t be too hard to whip up. Even if you only add 4-5” you d be doubling the operating space in front of the blade.

Some rough ideas to illustrate:

- knotscott

Wow never seen that before. I like that

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion

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JBrow

818 posts in 383 days


#5 posted 04-07-2016 02:33 AM

scottkeen,

I am not sure that doubling up the plywood to 1-1/2 is necessary. However, by so doing you can build the rabbets and dados you need without cutting grooves into the plywood you dread. Rather one layer of plywood could be cut to the shelf, side, bottom, and back dimensions needed. The second layer, applied to the inside of the cabinet box would be smaller multiple pieces and dimensioned so that when fastened into place, ¾” rabbets and dados would emerge.

By example to further illustrate my suggestion, I assume a single layer of ¾” plywood for the back and bottom and a single layer of ¾” plywood as a shelf. Hopefully this example is sufficient to illustrate this method. A side panel that is 27” wide and 29” tall would be cut to this dimension. If ¾” rabbets at the front and back and bottom and a ¾” shelf receiving dado at 14-1/2” – 15-1/4” high in the side panel are required, two pieces of inner layer plywood would be cut at 25-1/2” wide x 13-3/4” tall. The first inner layer piece would be attached to the inside of the side panel ¾” up from the bottom edge of the side panel, forming a rabbet for the bottom shelf and set back ¾” from the vertical edges of the side panel creating rabbets on the front and back vertical side panel edges. The second inner piece would be similarly installed but flush with the top edge of the side panel. A ¾” dado would be created at 14-1/2” – 15-1/4”.

Drawers on heavy duty ball bearing full extension glides provide access to everything the drawer. Stooping down and rooting through a dark bay behind a door is not something I enjoy doing. Unfortunately drawers are more expensive and take more time.

View pete724's profile

pete724

36 posts in 272 days


#6 posted 04-07-2016 11:28 AM



If I was in your shoes, I d seriously consider adding some usable “landing” space in front of the same blade. A fence extension of some sort would probably be useful, but that shouldn t be too hard to whip up. Even if you only add 4-5” you d be doubling the operating space in front of the blade.

Some rough ideas to illustrate:

- knotscott

Actually It Would be difficult!

This saw has the Rack and pinion MOVING fence rails!

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#7 posted 04-07-2016 12:34 PM

Just leave some space for those rails to extend.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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scottkeen

44 posts in 389 days


#8 posted 04-07-2016 10:44 PM

Thanks for the replies guys.

I like the idea of a larger space in front of the blade. Certainly need more space in front of the blade.

Moving the router table to the right side of the saw, between the rack and pinion rails, would actually fit with 1-3/4” to spare. The table saw table depth is 19-3/4” between the rails and the router table depth is 18”. But I want to be able to use the fence of the other tool. The more I thought about this, I realized that using the fence on the router table to rip wide cuts on the table saw just won’t work because the router table fence pivots. However, using the fence on the table saw when routing dadoes in the middle of a large board, that could work.

I’ve re-drawn the Sketchup using 3/4” plywood in most spots and 1-1/2” doubled plywood in only a few places. I think I saved 1 sheet of plywood by doing that. 3 sheets instead of 4.

Casters… I’m looking at 5” polyurethane casters for this. Does that sound about right? They sit 6-1/8” from the ground to the top of the plate.

Anyone try these? The brake locks both the wheel and the swivel.

Steelex D2612 5-Inch 300-Pound Swivel Double Lock Polyurethane Plate Caster

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JBrow

818 posts in 383 days


#9 posted 04-08-2016 04:07 AM

scottkeen,

I have no experience with casters you show, but the price is good. I have used a similar style heavy duty caster from Peachtree Woodworking Supply. Theirs are offered in 3” and 4” sizes. If you want a little more height for storage these would help, but if rolling across a rough surface, the larger wheels are better. They are rated at 300 pounds and are double locking but cost about $3 or $4 more. They have worked well for me.

http://www.ptreeusa.com/wheels_casters.htm

View pete724's profile

pete724

36 posts in 272 days


#10 posted 04-08-2016 07:29 AM



Just leave some space for those rails to extend.

- knotscott

That can work, and these Dewalts DO need more infeed.
Every adjustment of the saw then requires reaching UNDER that additional infeed landing.
Rasing the blade, tilting the blade, adjusting the fence and Locking the fence.
But hey if you can deal with that go for it.

View pete724's profile

pete724

36 posts in 272 days


#11 posted 04-08-2016 07:35 AM


Thanks for the replies guys.

Moving the router table to the right side of the saw, between the rack and pinion rails, would actually fit with 1-3/4” to spare. The table saw table depth is 19-3/4” between the rails and the router table depth is 18”. But I want to be able to use the fence of the other tool. The more I thought about this, I realized that using the fence on the router table to rip wide cuts on the table saw just won t work because the router table fence pivots. However, using the fence on the table saw when routing dadoes in the middle of a large board, that could work.

Exactly and guess what, I HAVE used the TS fence for making full 3/4’ dadoes in the “middle” of a board.

TS fence does the spacing and dado is cut with the router.

You just flip the TS fence end for end on the same “pins” on the rails.

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#12 posted 04-08-2016 12:55 PM

Just leave some space for those rails to extend.

- knotscott

That can work, and these Dewalts DO need more infeed.
Every adjustment of the saw then requires reaching UNDER that additional infeed landing.
Rasing the blade, tilting the blade, adjusting the fence and Locking the fence.
But hey if you can deal with that go for it.

- pete724

That raises a good point. It’s probably roughly the same distance you’d reach under a contractor saw or cabinet saw, but I suspect the wheel will be closer to the top. Could put the infeed support on sliders, just leave some space, or just reach under. There’s never a free lunch is there?!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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scottkeen

44 posts in 389 days


#13 posted 04-08-2016 01:14 PM

At some point I’m just going to stop trying to hack things and get a SawStop.

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scottkeen

44 posts in 389 days


#14 posted 04-08-2016 05:04 PM

I modified the Sketchup to make a 5” infeed space in front of the table saw. I like the design and the extra space. Makes the depth go from 27” to now 32”. The new dimensions are 48” L x 32” W x 34” H (with the 6-1/8” casters).

I made it 32” wide so I can roll the cabinet through my condo’s balcony patio door which is 32” wide. But after I already drew this up in Sketchup, I measured the hallway and interior door of the room in the condo where I will store the cabinet… and they’re 28” wide. UGGGGH! Well, back to the original design without the infeed space. In fact, I better make sure I can make the corner turn if it’s 48” L. This whole thing might have been a waste of time.

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scottkeen

44 posts in 389 days


#15 posted 04-08-2016 05:24 PM

Well, so much for this whole idea. I clamped together a wireframe model and I can’t make the turn to move the cabinet cart into the guest bedroom off the hallway to store it. 48”x27” just won’t make the turn.

I live in a condo and wanted to do work on the balcony and store my bench tools in the guest bedroom off the hallway.

So, I can either scrap this whole idea, go to single carts for each tool, or make the larger 48”x32” cabinet cart and store it in the living room which has a 32”W patio door to the balcony or keep it on the balcony with a BBQ grill cover (no weather protection outside). Buy a bigger house, no, don’t go there.

What to do, what to do…

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