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Larks Tongue chamfer stop

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Forum topic by jonlan posted 04-03-2016 11:15 PM 698 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jonlan

35 posts in 355 days


04-03-2016 11:15 PM

Im wondering if anyone has any advice on how to make a ‘larks tongue’ end to a stopped chamfer. Something like this…

http://cadsetterout.com/inventor-tutorials/ifeatures-larks-tongue-chamfer/

I have a chamfering bit for my router table and could easily cut this without the stops, but Im not sure on how to achieve the sloped stopped ends. If I stop the chamfer on the router table I wont get that gradual slope to the end. I imagine I need to find a way to slowly move the work piece away from the bit at the end, but I can’t sort out in my mind how I would actually do that. Tomorrow I’ll go out and try a couple of tests to see if I can make it work but I was wondering if anyone has done this before and had some advice.

Also – I’ve only heard it called a ‘larks tongue’ through a couple of google searches so that may be off on the terminology.

Thanks


7 replies so far

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Texcaster

1140 posts in 1142 days


#1 posted 04-04-2016 12:38 AM

If a stopped chamfer is made with a router, the stop, if it is to look symmetrical, must be finished by hand. However a stopped chamfer, cut on the shaper is symmetrical without the hand work due to the larger cutting radius.

All these shaper cut stops are symmetrical without the handwork.

Through cuts and square shoulders, rebates and chamfers

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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jonlan

35 posts in 355 days


#2 posted 04-04-2016 12:43 AM

Thanks for your reply. I’ve never used a shaper but my understanding was that they were just larger more powerful versions of a router tables. Bigger spindle, motor, etc.

If my assumption is correct, does that mean that a shaper could handle a bit with a larger radius that would give the sloped look that Im looking for?

I’ll look more at bits and see if I can find one that has a larger radius.

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lateralus819

2236 posts in 1357 days


#3 posted 04-04-2016 12:47 AM

Just use a chisel..

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conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#4 posted 04-04-2016 01:09 AM

I have made those chamfers on a router table on table legs
.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#5 posted 04-04-2016 01:23 AM

I used a 1/2 shank, standard size 45* bit.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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Texcaster

1140 posts in 1142 days


#6 posted 04-04-2016 01:32 AM



Thanks for your reply. I ve never used a shaper but my understanding was that they were just larger more powerful versions of a router tables. Bigger spindle, motor, etc.

If my assumption is correct, does that mean that a shaper could handle a bit with a larger radius that would give the sloped look that Im looking for?

I ll look more at bits and see if I can find one that has a larger radius.

- jonlan

100mm radius vs 20mm radius.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 909 days


#7 posted 04-04-2016 02:56 AM

Not sure what type of chamfer-end you are looking for. Rounded, like the left example in this drawing, or beveled, like the one on the right. A chamfer bit in a router will leave an uneven, curved chamfer-end, curved on one face and almost beveled on the other. This cut can be smoothed and evened out with a shaped sanding block, or even a large dowel wrapped in sandpaper.

To get a straight beveled chamfer stop, your best bet is a sharp chisel, which can be guided by a wood block (or not).

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