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tabletop dilema- 3 boards=1 in., 1 board =7/8

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Forum topic by romeege posted 04-03-2016 04:31 PM 941 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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romeege

18 posts in 2474 days


04-03-2016 04:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: oak

I’m torn about these 4 unique oak boards roughly 8-9 ft. long. I don’t want to plane down the 3 to 7/8 in. because I want 1 in. Any thoughts would be appreciated..Put the one in the middle? It may actually be a 1/16 less than 7/8. Being a lifelong carpenter,I am sick of 3/4, 1 1/2, etc…..thanks for your thoughts


14 replies so far

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#1 posted 04-03-2016 04:47 PM

If you’re going to do something like breadboard ends, you could get away with putting the thinner board somewhere in the middle.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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JoeinGa

7483 posts in 1473 days


#2 posted 04-03-2016 05:13 PM

Put the thin one in the middle and shim it from underneath?

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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romeege

18 posts in 2474 days


#3 posted 04-03-2016 05:33 PM

Ah yes,the breadboard idea..Very good idea… That would tend to solve the problem…I am just not crazy about that look…The other idea of shimming is one that I have considered, and maybe that is ok…maybe the tabletop can be a rougher look with different material for legs and skirt board. People these days seem to like the reclaimed look which is far from perfect.. thanks guys

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#4 posted 04-03-2016 10:58 PM

Could you make a laminate from the thin board to bring it to final thickness using a secondary wood?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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romeege

18 posts in 2474 days


#5 posted 04-03-2016 11:06 PM

hi scott, thanks for the idea. I was thinking of adding something at the ends-glue up another piece of the same hardwood, and your idea is another good solution- but either way you would see “the glue job” unless your really good at hiding it. I guess I could do a mockup the see how it would look.. thanks again!

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#6 posted 04-04-2016 11:58 AM

If you can carefully match the wood grain direction, gluing on a thin piece would not be that noticeable.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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distrbd

2227 posts in 1912 days


#7 posted 04-04-2016 02:00 PM

I have question or a thought, if you use dowels ,wouldn’t the holes (on every board) be based on one edge? what I’m thinking is, all the dowel holes are going to be drilled let’s say 1/4” away from the the edge regardless of the thickness of each board.
This way the jointed table top will be even but on the surface (top side) but the underside will have one board lower by 1/8”. does that make sense?

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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romeege

18 posts in 2474 days


#8 posted 04-12-2016 02:37 PM

this is a question for knotscott about breadboard attachment methods. Since i don’t have a lot of tools I am wondering if a biscuit joiner could work to hold the breadboard. thanks.

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#9 posted 04-13-2016 09:42 AM


this is a question for knotscott about breadboard attachment methods. Since i don t have a lot of tools I am wondering if a biscuit joiner could work to hold the breadboard. thanks.

- romeege

I’d think biscuits alone would be very weak against any downward force, unless you made some monster big ones….typical sizes just aren’t thick enough to offer much vertical support. It’d likely snap at the biscuits if a big guy leaned on the breadboard end. Dowels or dominoes would be stronger. Or if you could just rabbetted the end of the table, and created a opposite groove in the b-board end, then glued in just a couple of places, it’d be stronger than biscuits.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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romeege

18 posts in 2474 days


#10 posted 04-13-2016 10:49 AM

this looks very nice but I don’t know how I would cut that deep groove in the breadboard- I have limited tooling. That looks to be roughly half the width of the breadboard..about 1-1/2”.. I could possible use a table saw and ease the blade up and put marks where to stop,etc. but other than that,I don’t think any router bit could do it- maybe a slot cutter router bit but it would be too shallow I think. Hmmm,so maybe the table saw could do it- Or I actually do have a doweling jig that I could use…. what do you think? thanks again, I really appreciate you taking the time!

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firefighterontheside

13506 posts in 1322 days


#11 posted 04-13-2016 12:32 PM

You could use a 1/4 spiral bit in the router to cut that groove. Make about 4 passes. Or you could use the table saw as you suggested and then the router to square up the rounded ends made by the table saw.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#12 posted 04-13-2016 12:39 PM

The TS should work well…use a stop block on the fence so you don’t have to aim for the marks, make multiple passes til the width is right. If you have a doweling jig, that’d work well too.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1762 days


#13 posted 04-13-2016 12:58 PM

Why not put a chamfer around the perimeter of the top. This example is extreme but if you make the angle shallow you would only see the difference in thickness of boards if you got down low enough.

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romeege

18 posts in 2474 days


#14 posted 04-17-2016 12:05 PM

guys thanks a lot.I really appreciate you all taking your time to help me on this. Lots of good ideas!

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