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Prelateral Stanley No. 7 restoration

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Forum topic by Marn64 posted 04-02-2016 10:06 PM 917 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marn64

209 posts in 249 days


04-02-2016 10:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question plane refurbishing

Hello, I’ve been a long time reader of these forums but this is my first post! Anyway, I’ve recently acquired a type 4 no 7 stanley and I’ve been working to restore it and I have some questions. The plane has about 75 to 80 percent original japanning and I want to preserve it while removing any rust underneath the enamel, so I am going to use citric acid. Should I remove the depth adjuster yoke from the frog for this? Second, after all rust on the cast iron and any under the japanning is removed, will it affect its value if I cover the bald spots on the body with Pontypool asphaltum japanning, and keep the original japanning where it is still intact?

Thanks,
Ben




-- Benjamin, Milwaukee


25 replies so far

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Johnny7

208 posts in 554 days


#1 posted 04-02-2016 11:06 PM

I advise against screwing around with the depth adjustment yoke—that operation is unneccessary and takes a back seat only to driving out the pin for the lateral adjuster (an operation fraught with peril)

Touch ups with Pontypool are fine (this isn’t a particularly valuable plane). If you are worried about collector value, shellac (tinted black) works great and is removed easily in the future with alcohol.

Citric acid is the only thing I use anymore (been at this for nearly 20 years), and I have never repainted a single casting with spray paint. I am a minimalist/conservator type rehabber (admittedly, I only buy planes in pretty darn nice shape to begin with).

P.S. —whatever you do, don’t BLO the rosewood—it will only turn black and you will have obscured some of the finest grain of any wood God ever created. If you want to, you can lightly sand them, then shellac them.

P.P.S—as long as I’m being opinionated, I advise against scrubbing the brass until it glows. In my humble opinion, it does not look right when the rest of the plane is not at that same level.

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builtinbkyn

651 posts in 404 days


#2 posted 04-02-2016 11:51 PM

I really don’t understand the idea of buying a tool with resale in mind. There are thousands of Stanley planes in the world. These aren’t museum pieces. They’re tools for working wood. The Japanning is just a protective coating and evidenced by yours and the thousands of others, it doesn’t last forever and it’s not gold leaf.

I “restored” a 5 1/2. I removed all of the japanning that would easily come off with a wire brush and then sprayed it with Rustolium which is probably much more durable than the original japanning. I have no issue with spraying the body. I don’t plan on reselling it and well even if I did, it’s painted. The japanning was protection as is the oil-based paint. That too will eventually go the same way as the japanning, but probably not in my lifetime. I like shiny brass too :)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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Johnny7

208 posts in 554 days


#3 posted 04-03-2016 04:53 AM

Bill

If you’re happy with your plane, that’s great—it’s yours to do with as you wish.
Some of us like to keep the time-worn look of these old tools—I happen to be one of these.

If you’ll notice, the OP specifically stated that he wanted to do a “restoration” (yours, by the way is not a restoration).
He went on to say that since most of the original japanning was still there, that he wanted to “preserve” it.

I gave the advice I gave with those things in mind.

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builtinbkyn

651 posts in 404 days


#4 posted 04-03-2016 01:03 PM

I fully understand John. I put restoration in quotes because, as you said it wasn’t a true restoration. To restore is to return to like new condition. To do that I would have had to strip the entire body and apply the same drying oil in the same manner, that was used by Stanley at the turn of the last century. Leaving a few bits of the original japanning for “value”, really doesn’t make sense to me, but that’s just me. If the jappaning is intact, well that’s a different story and I guess nice to have.

I use the tools I buy as I’m sure you must. I view antique tools differently than antiques that are collected for intrinsic value. Those are generally left alone to retain their historic as well as their intrinsic value.

These are just my opinions. :)


Bill

If you re happy with your plane, that s great—it s yours to do with as you wish.
Some of us like to keep the time-worn look of these old tools—I happen to be one of these.

If you ll notice, the OP specifically stated that he wanted to do a “restoration” (yours, by the way is not a restoration).
He went on to say that since most of the original japanning was still there, that he wanted to “preserve” it.

I gave the advice I gave with those things in mind.

- Johnny7


-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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Don W

17965 posts in 2031 days


#5 posted 04-03-2016 04:47 PM

http://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/01/26/to-restore-a-hand-plane-or-to-not-restore-a-hand-plane/

It all depends on your end goal.

There is a “no soak” method on.my site as well. You might want to give it a try as well.

Keep in mind no matter what you do, if the original japanning has rust under it, it will lift and come off.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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builtinbkyn

651 posts in 404 days


#6 posted 04-03-2016 05:45 PM

Hey Don. I enjoyed your blog article and appreciate the sentiments imparted. It is rather unique that hand plane purists express the sentiments they do. Antique car guys don’t leave pitted chrome alone because it was the original chrome. They remove the pitted chrome and then redo the chrome. Same goes for many of the guys that purchase and use antique machinery like old Deltas. They’re stripped down and restored to like new condition. No one says “Hey that’s not the original Delta paint”. They want a machine that looks and functions as new.

I collect other “antiques” as well, but I use them and also feel they’re mine and I’d like them to be both functional and in a condition that, if not fully authentic in finish and design, they’re at least in a condition that provides the same utility and appearance as they were when new. I guess if I were buying as an “investment” and with an eye to sell, then my approach might be different. But, I buy stuff I like and use. I also like to have them look nice as well. If that reduces their value, well that’s the next person’s problem after I’m gone. After all, we really don’t own anything. We only have them for our duration and then they’re someone else’s. :O

Enjoyed perusing your site and have it bookmarked.


http://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/01/26/to-restore-a-hand-plane-or-to-not-restore-a-hand-plane/

It all depends on your end goal.

There is a “no soak” method on.my site as well. You might want to give it a try as well.

Keep in mind no matter what you do, if the original japanning has rust under it, it will lift and come off.

- Don W

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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Don W

17965 posts in 2031 days


#7 posted 04-03-2016 08:24 PM

Thanks Bill.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Marn64's profile

Marn64

209 posts in 249 days


#8 posted 04-03-2016 10:12 PM

Thanks all for the advice! :)

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

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Johnny7

208 posts in 554 days


#9 posted 04-03-2016 11:42 PM

Bill

These forums need more people like you—meaning those able to have a civil conversation where opinions differ.

Thanks for that.

Johnny

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Marn64

209 posts in 249 days


#10 posted 04-03-2016 11:55 PM

Bill

These forums need more people like you—meaning those able to have a civil conversation where opinions differ.

Thanks for that.

Johnny

- Johnny7

agreed, thanks to all for the advice and insightful comments!

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

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builtinbkyn

651 posts in 404 days


#11 posted 04-04-2016 12:44 AM

Hey Johnny. Hopefully we’re all here to share ideas, share our creations and methods, learn and even give opinions. Arguing isn’t part of the deal. :)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14583 posts in 2147 days


#12 posted 04-04-2016 01:25 AM

Sometimes, on a few of the planes I “restore” , it is nothing more drastic than a wipe-down to remove the dirt and grime….followed by an oil-filled paint brush to coat the OEM painted/japanned parts. I add some 3in1 oil to a brush, and the rub the brush on all the surfaces. It treats the rusty spots, and shines the japanning back to like new. even the wood will get a brush-off.

About all it took. YMMV

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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sikrap

1121 posts in 2823 days


#13 posted 04-04-2016 07:25 PM

I will be somewhat the contrarian here and suggest that you do NOT try to restore this plane unless you are pretty good at it. Pre – laterals are pretty valuable to collectors and most of them want the plane as found. I’ve sold several over the last few years and they always ask for them to be “barn fresh”.

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

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HokieKen

1758 posts in 602 days


#14 posted 04-04-2016 08:32 PM

I’m with Bill. The planes I buy are bought to be users and I like them to look pretty and feel good too. Mostly though, I think it’s just the process of “shining” it up is sorta therapeutic. Unless the japanning is 100%, I sandblast it off, do a soak in phosporic acid, then prime it and coat it with engine enamel. If the knob/tote has a film finish, I strip it and oil/wax them. Then I polish the hell outta everything :P

I gotta say Bill, the depth adjustment knob on that 5-1/2 is probably the shiniest one I’ve ever seen. That’s one nice looking user!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Ocelot

1470 posts in 2102 days


#15 posted 04-04-2016 08:40 PM

Since I buy tools to use, I prefer post-laterals. I think each person needs to have his goal clearly in mind. If you are talking about collecting/”restoring” for value, I think you probably should choose something different than old Stanley planes. One of the main reason they are popular is that they are relatively cheap, and they work well with a little attention.

Of course, it is only my opinion.

I’ve never used a prelateral (unless you count a no 60 1/2 block plane). My oldest plane is a type 9 number 6 which works very well in my opinion.

Yours is a nice looking plane anyway – just as it is.

-Paul

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