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Forum topic by artsyfartsy posted 04-02-2016 09:18 PM 887 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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artsyfartsy

648 posts in 625 days


04-02-2016 09:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question lathe turning

I’ve got an old Delta wood lathe and I’ve just begun to re-learn how to use it. I’m looking for a drill chuck for it and have found several on the internet. But, there are several to choose from such as; MT1, MT 2 or a MT 3. So, which one do I choose? I want at least a 1/2” chuck for large diameter drills. I’m really confused as to which direction to turn, so to speak. No pun intended!

-- DWelch. Michigan, The only dumb question is the one not asked!


27 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#1 posted 04-02-2016 09:29 PM

Depends on the taper size of your tailstock… which is where you typically mount a drill chuck. “MT” stands for morse taper, and the number specifies the diameters with 1 smaller than 2, 2 smaller than 3, etc.. Can’t help much without knowing what lathe you have though.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View HapHazzard's profile

HapHazzard

92 posts in 334 days


#2 posted 04-03-2016 01:15 AM

This page has a table showing the dimensions of the different Morse tapers.
http://www.victornet.com/reference/Morse_Jacobs.html

-- Unix programmers never die; they just > /dev/null

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7929 posts in 1846 days


#3 posted 04-03-2016 01:28 AM

Does your lathe have a model number?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1196 days


#4 posted 04-03-2016 03:24 AM

Measure the hole on either the spindle or quill. If they are near 3/4”, more than likely they will be MT 2. Larger, it’s a #3, and smaller it will be a #1…............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1886 posts in 1601 days


#5 posted 04-03-2016 12:20 PM

If posted a model number or picture could pretty much tell you what Morse taper your Delta has and save you some time.

-- Bill

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artsyfartsy

648 posts in 625 days


#6 posted 04-03-2016 01:47 PM

Thank you gentlemen on your quick response’s. First off, my lathe is an “oldie” but a “goody”. The manual dates it at 3/21/1957. It’s a Delta Rockwell Model 46-111 Homecraft 14/11” Gap bed lathe. I am looking for a drill chuck NOT for the tail stock but for the live end. The live end is tapered from .700 to .575 and is 2.5 inches long. Does any of that info help?

Following are pictures of my Lathe.

Again, thanks for all your responses.

-- DWelch. Michigan, The only dumb question is the one not asked!

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1196 days


#7 posted 04-03-2016 02:22 PM

Hey Fartsy, MT2, no doubts or questions…............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View HapHazzard's profile

HapHazzard

92 posts in 334 days


#8 posted 04-03-2016 02:23 PM

That’s a Morse 2 (M2) taper. If there’s rust on the inner surface, it would be a good idea to remove it. Those round wire brushes plumbers use to clean out slip fittings work great for this. You need a 3/4” one. You’ll want to clean those threads before you go to put a chuck on too.

-- Unix programmers never die; they just > /dev/null

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artsyfartsy

648 posts in 625 days


#9 posted 04-03-2016 02:35 PM

Thanks Guys, I appreciate your input. I’ll get on those threads and the inner surface right away. BTW, You can always catch me on the weather forum.

Stay safe my friends.

-- DWelch. Michigan, The only dumb question is the one not asked!

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 767 days


#10 posted 04-03-2016 10:46 PM

Most spindles and quills are made of soft metal so be careful with a hardened steel bristle brush.
I would use a brass brush for the exterior; for the interior (MT) I would coat with WD40 or similar and use 4-0 steel wool with a wooden dowell. Of course use a dry towel on the MT to remove excess oil.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1196 days


#11 posted 04-04-2016 02:58 PM

Fartsy, if you don’t already have the chuck, get one with a MT2 JT 33 taper and you’re set.. I’m sure any of the stores woodturners use will have both taper and chucks for under 40 bucks all the way up to 3-4 hundred if you want to go that route…... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7929 posts in 1846 days


#12 posted 04-04-2016 03:17 PM

I bought mine at littlemachineshop.com. No affiliation, just good service and fast shipping.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View HapHazzard's profile

HapHazzard

92 posts in 334 days


#13 posted 04-05-2016 03:31 AM


Most spindles and quills are made of soft metal so be careful with a hardened steel bristle brush.
I would use a brass brush for the exterior; for the interior (MT) I would coat with WD40 or similar and use 4-0 steel wool with a wooden dowell. Of course use a dry towel on the MT to remove excess oil.

- LeeMills

They’re not hardened. If they were, the bristles would all break of with the first twist. They’re made for cleaning copper pipe, so they’re not that aggressive. I use them on my quills all the time and they work great.

WD-40 is a good idea. Its viscosity is so low it won’t make the spindle slip.

Instead of steel wool I’ve been using those brown 3M metal pads. They work about the same as medium steel wool, but they don’t give you slivers in your hands.

-- Unix programmers never die; they just > /dev/null

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artsyfartsy

648 posts in 625 days


#14 posted 04-05-2016 01:35 PM

WOW! What a nice response from such a learned group of guys. I like all the ideas and since I’m a newby, I’ll file all those ideas for future use. Jerry, from Tucson, Unfortunately I have already ordered a chuck from PSI woodworking through Amazon. I hope I did the right thing. The cost is $32. plus shipping. However, I did look at and request a catalog from Littlemachineshop.com. Thanks Rick M. for the advise as well.

Now onto another subject, eventually, I want to buy a 3 or 4 jaw lathe chuck. And as usual, there are zillions to choose from. Do I get a 4 jaw or a 3 jaw? Do I get a 4” or a 5”? Do I get one with all the gizmo’s that go with it or just a plain one? For a beginner, it’s a tough choice. I have a lot of questions. Is there another site to go to on LJ or is this the path to take? I was a machine operator in my past life and I have used a Hardringe metal lathe from time to time and they make life easy compared to a wood lathe. Anyway, I have lots of questions.

Thanks for all the advise gentlemen.

-- DWelch. Michigan, The only dumb question is the one not asked!

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 767 days


#15 posted 04-05-2016 03:18 PM

You need a 4 jaw for woodturning (not metal turning). A four inch is plenty large enough. I have Novas but there are several good brands. Most chucks don’t come with any gizmos; some are packaged with additional jaws which may or may not be useful to you. Most chucks come with the body, key, and one set of jaws.
Most chucks take an insert to fit your spindle but a few are direct threaded. With the insert type you can move to a lathe with a different spindle just by replacing the insert.

Correction: Hap is right about the brushes, they are not hardened however the one I have has bristles much harder than the steel used for the spindle. Didn’t take much for a paper towel to come away black/gray from the steel of the spindle. There are probably all type of these brushes with different hardness of the wire.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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